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Marcia Selsor

Foil Saggar Results

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Babs    386

Wow, like baked potatoes! Thought that the saggars would have to be like little boxes!

I think I can do that!, The wrapping I'm writing about!

Thanks.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

use a double layer of heavy duty foil. compress over the surface of the pots.These are fired to 1150 to 1400. Watch the foil as it fired.Try not to over fire the foil. It will get dull and can puff up. Stop at that point or sooner. That could be hard to determine in an electric kiln.

 

 

Marcia

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Babs    386

Thanks Marcia, I'll do a temp conversion to Centigrade and then ponder for a time! Do have hte remnants of my old gas kiln in the yard so..... wait till I have a couple of weeks "free" and then work on it.

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stonefly    2

Marcia, those textured Obveras are blowing my mind.  I've come back to look through your images again four times now since yesterday (And I'm supposed to be working!!)  What is it that makes the belly of the pot lighter than the foot and rim in such a lovely gradation?  Is that happening from the "dunk in the soup" or have you applied something to the pot to encourage that color shift?  They are just breathtaking - I'd never heard of "obvera" before - now I'm googling it all night!  (Is there a book I should buy?)

Thanks for sharing - so inspirational!

Cristy in WY

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stonefly    2

Whoops!  I found the obvera thread!  Sorry - not for the gushing, but for spouting off before reading thoroughly.  I'll go read that one, but the gushing and adoration still apply!

:wub:

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Thanks Christy. I threw some small ones today. I want to bring some to NCECA to trade with some friends.

The gradation is from the cooling of the soup. It is an amazing "right before your eyes" process.

Janice Chassier is going to give a lecture on her research in Eastern Europe of the Obvara Process.

Marcia

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Here are pictures of my chemically treated bisqued pots that were post fired with only a propane torch. Though I am first to admit they are not anywhere near Marcia's'.

 

They were treated with ferric chloride ( made by reacting clean steel wool with muriatic acid and evaporating til concentrated) and copper citrate ( made by reacting copper carbonate with citric acid.).  The copper citrate has the advantage of not soaking in to the clay so much as copper sulphate. It gives a pretty green cast rather than just grey or black.

 

Oh yeah.. I also am trying horse hair. with mixed results.  Anyone know the sectet of how to keep it from rolling up into a single ball?

 

Saggar... what saggar?... I don't need no stinking saggar!

 

P.S Norm. Have you tried iorn oxalate... I have been thinking that might help the Fe stay on the surface so that you would not need so much to get a deep red.

These are pieces I colored using iron sulphate and a torch. The pedestals were not clay.

post-1954-0-51383800-1395071626_thumb.jpg

post-1954-0-51383800-1395071626_thumb.jpg

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Thanks, I brought some to NCECA to trade. Evelyne, you're piece looked great in the show. by working at the both I got to meet many of the artists. It was an excellent representation of the work by Potters COUNCIL Members.

Can't wait to make more.

 

Marcia

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

 

Marcia: I like the soft, gray touch of your new pieces. Congrats on the success.

 

Hmmmm, I always wanted to try the foil saggars too in an electric kiln, but was a bit hesitant because of the fumes. I think I'll wait a bit longer...

 

Babs: thanks bunches for the recipe. I'am sure summer will come along some day....

 

Beyond Wax Resist

This guy uses foil saggars in his electric kiln and writes that it has no or little illl effects.

I discovered this link form the post on Elmers Glue as a resist so thanks to whoever posted it there. Matt Oz.

 

Marcia: I like the soft, gray touch of your new pieces. Congrats on the success.

 

Hmmmm, I always wanted to try the foil saggars too in an electric kiln, but was a bit hesitant because of the fumes. I think I'll wait a bit longer...

 

Babs: thanks bunches for the recipe. I'am sure summer will come along some day....

 

Beyond Wax Resist

This guy uses foil saggars in his electric kiln and writes that it has no or little illl effects.

I discovered this link form the post on Elmers Glue as a resist so thanks to whoever posted it there. Matt Oz.

 

Marcia: I like the soft, gray touch of your new pieces. Congrats on the success.

 

Hmmmm, I always wanted to try the foil saggars too in an electric kiln, but was a bit hesitant because of the fumes. I think I'll wait a bit longer...

 

Babs: thanks bunches for the recipe. I'am sure summer will come along some day....

 

Beyond Wax Resist

This guy uses foil saggars in his electric kiln and writes that it has no or little illl effects.

 

this guy, Russel Fouts from Brussels, is a dear friend and my NCECA roommate . he is doing incredible things in electric kilns. I have posted links to his sites and articles before. he fires in an electric kiln with brick saggars inside. He is currently firing with charcoal in the saggars

 

he has written article for PMI and showed pieces in the NCECA National in Louisville.

marcia

 

I discovered this link form the post on Elmers Glue as a resist so thanks to whoever posted it there. Matt Oz.

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