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Marcia Selsor

Foil Saggar Results

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I fired some new pieces yesterday. I am experimenting with colors. Epsom salts and iron sulphate, cobalt sulphate, copper sulphate, Miracle grow for acid needy flowers, etc.

Jan. 27 firings is the second group of 4.see the large pot in a later post or in my gallery. I love the colors!

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Kohaku    22

Lovely. Whatever glaze (or sagger materials) you used on the center piece interacted with the burnishing particularly well.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

The center piece is cobalt sulphate with epsom salts solution.I like that one too.I am attempting to achieve color variation but with interesting graphic patterns pn the smooth surface. I find the orb form to be a satisfying "blank canvas".

Marcia

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Marcia, beautiful, as always. Kudos to you!!

 

If ever you are doing an alternative firing course in Tuscany, book me in! So much to learn still and you are our alternative firing genius...

 

Evelyne

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Excellent results as always. Are you creating a liquid out of the salts and appying it directly to the piece?

I've been experimenting and had good results putting the materials in a foil pouch inside the piece and letting it fume onto the surface.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

That sounds intriguing, Marc. I put some sawdust in one to blacken the inside and some of the top of the outside got black too.

I want to try more with Epsom salts too. It seems to have strong interaction with the salts.

 

Marcia

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oldlady    1,323

great stuff, marcia. how about doing a video of the whole process?    or have you done it and i just don't know it.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Ken Turner did the foil saggar section at the PC conference in Mn.Just as Sumi did the pit fire and Billy Ray did raku sculpture.

I just made a dvd on obvara, raku,horse hair and ceramic saggar for teachers.

I usually fire alone without anyone around.

Maybe something can be arranged. It is simple but uses some nasty chemical. I only have one vapor respirator.

This process requires nitric gloves and vapor respirator as safety gear.

 

Marcia

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ditto on the precautions. I wear a respirator whenever I am within 20' of the kiln.

I've also taken to wearing full goggles and tyvec suite when I apply the ferric. Little droplets seem to get everywhere. I figure getting that stuff in the eyes should be avoided. ;)

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PeterH    87

Norm, Great idea to avoid ferric chloride when possible. Are you using ferrous or ferric phosphate, and

what did you buy it as (e.g. slug killer). Regards, Peter

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Bob Coyle    113

Here are pictures of my chemically treated bisqued pots that were post fired with only a propane torch. Though I am first to admit they are not anywhere near Marcia's'.

 

They were treated with ferric chloride ( made by reacting clean steel wool with muriatic acid and evaporating til concentrated) and copper citrate ( made by reacting copper carbonate with citric acid.).  The copper citrate has the advantage of not soaking in to the clay so much as copper sulphate. It gives a pretty green cast rather than just grey or black.

 

Oh yeah.. I also am trying horse hair. with mixed results.  Anyone know the sectet of how to keep it from rolling up into a single ball?

 

Saggar... what saggar?... I don't need no stinking saggar!

 

P.S Norm. Have you tried iorn oxalate... I have been thinking that might help the Fe stay on the surface so that you would not need so much to get a deep red.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Nice work!. Thanks. There are quite a few foil saggar people around. Ken Turner did a great workshop at the PC conference in Minn. And Marc McMillan has shared several pieces recently in the members gallery. It is an interesting process involving some nasty chemicals.

 

Thanks for sharing.

 

Marcia

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Here are pictures of my chemically treated bisqued pots that were post fired with only a propane torch. Though I am first to admit they are not anywhere near Marcia's'.

 

They were treated with ferric chloride ( made by reacting clean steel wool with muriatic acid and evaporating til concentrated) and copper citrate ( made by reacting copper carbonate with citric acid.).  The copper citrate has the advantage of not soaking in to the clay so much as copper sulphate. It gives a pretty green cast rather than just grey or black.

 

Oh yeah.. I also am trying horse hair. with mixed results.  Anyone know the sectet of how to keep it from rolling up into a single ball?

 

Saggar... what saggar?... I don't need no stinking saggar!

 

P.S Norm. Have you tried iorn oxalate... I have been thinking that might help the Fe stay on the surface so that you would not need so much to get a deep red.

 

 

Those are interesting. I used a torch on iron sulphate on some architectural pieces. It responds well to a torch. Are the others sulphates too?

I used a torch to alter color of iron sulphate wash on terra cotta sculpture. It was really interesting. I did it outside for fresh air access.

Marcia

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

ditto on the precautions. I wear a respirator whenever I am within 20' of the kiln.

I've also taken to wearing full goggles and tyvec suite when I apply the ferric. Little droplets seem to get everywhere. I figure getting that stuff in the eyes should be avoided. ;)

I am not spraying these, I am applying with a sponge or sponge brush and working as neatly as possible. Still there are some stains on the formica.

Good Idea about the goggles.

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Bob Coyle    113

 

Those are interesting. I used a torch on iron sulphate on some architectural pieces. It responds well to a torch. Are the others sulphates too?

  Marcia

 

Citric, tartaric, and oxalic acids are all some of the things I have used to dissolve copper carb to get the weak acid salt. As Norm mentioned, these are thicker, les soluble,  solutions and hence tend to stay on the surface of a bisqued pot. so not as much is needed. I'd say it takes only about 1/3 the amount to get a good rich black compared with what I get using just copper sulfate. The copper citrate puts so much copper on the surface that You can actually see it flash to copper with the reducing flame of the torch. Sadly, it oxidizes again immediately

 

I have used ferric ammonium chloride instead of straight ferric chloride, and it seems to give a weaker color. Nom's  iron phosphate looks like the way to go

 

I wonder could any of this stuff we have been talking about be used in conjunction with the Obvara technique you have perfected. If you could maybe spritz the pot with copper citrate and then Obvara it and get it into reduction it might be pretty interesting.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Interesting info Bob. Where does one begin to look for citric, tartaric and oxalic acids?

I have been avoiding spritzing but these chemicals may not be as hazardous. 

I wouldn't say I have perfected Obvara but it is fascinating. I can try something with it in January. I will be away during the holidays visiting family. and friends.

I'll let you know what happens.

Marcia

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Bob Coyle    113

Citric acid you can buy in many markets or health food stores. Tartaric acid is a little harder but chemical supply houses have it and probably e-bay.

Oxalic acid you get at Home Depot. It is the only one that is toxic...  but , since you are not going to eat it, and since it just burns up when flamed with no toxic fumes, there is no problem. 

 

Anyway keep it in mind next time you do your magic...  Have fun on the holidays :)

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Citric acid you can buy in many markets or health food stores. Tartaric acid is a little harder but chemical supply houses have it and probably e-bay.

Oxalic acid you get at Home Depot. It is the only one that is toxic...  but , since you are not going to eat it, and since it just burns up when flamed with no toxic fumes, there is no problem. 

 

Anyway keep it in mind next time you do your magic...  Have fun on the holidays :)

Thanks, Bob. I'll look in the grocery stores. I have citrus skins that also do some things but not all that interesting yet. I need to understand what to do with them.

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