Jump to content


Photo

What Do You Like Making Vs. What Sells

selling making price pricing

  • Please log in to reply
53 replies to this topic

Poll: Favorite VS. What Sells (53 member(s) have cast votes)

What is your favorite pot to make?

  1. Cup/Yunomi (4 votes [5.63%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.63%

  2. Teabowl (1 votes [1.41%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.41%

  3. Teapot (7 votes [9.86%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 9.86%

  4. Vase (4 votes [5.63%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.63%

  5. Bowl (17 votes [23.94%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 23.94%

  6. Plate (2 votes [2.82%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 2.82%

  7. Platter (5 votes [7.04%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 7.04%

  8. Lidded Jar (7 votes [9.86%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 9.86%

  9. Pitcher (2 votes [2.82%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 2.82%

  10. Mug (10 votes [14.08%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 14.08%

  11. Big Pots (7 votes [9.86%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 9.86%

  12. Other, please explain (5 votes [7.04%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 7.04%

What pot do you sell the most of, in general?

  1. Cup/Yunomi (4 votes [5.71%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.71%

  2. Teabowl (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  3. Teapot (1 votes [1.43%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.43%

  4. Vase (4 votes [5.71%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.71%

  5. Bowl (16 votes [22.86%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 22.86%

  6. Plate (2 votes [2.86%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 2.86%

  7. Platter (5 votes [7.14%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 7.14%

  8. Lidded Jar (4 votes [5.71%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.71%

  9. Pitcher (1 votes [1.43%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.43%

  10. Mug (26 votes [37.14%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 37.14%

  11. Big Pots (1 votes [1.43%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.43%

  12. Other, please explain (6 votes [8.57%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 8.57%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#41 ixchelm

ixchelm

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 24 March 2014 - 04:04 PM

As a newer potter, I've had the most success selling bowls. But I have taken classes and enjoyed the challenge presented making tea pots and throwing smaller pieces and using them to create a larger work.

#42 JLowes

JLowes

    Clay Doodler

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 266 posts
  • LocationAtlanta Georgia area

Posted 25 March 2014 - 09:34 AM

What I enjoy making most are raku fired figures of animals, which as it turns out is what i sell the most. My figures are wheel thrown, handbuilt and extruded "bullets" with added features such as eyes, ears, snouts, feet, tails, etc.  That is where each gains its own character, and where the buyer can start to "see" an animal they have stored in their mind. Most I fill with a few pieces of broken up bisque for a little user interaction via noise when shaken.  Tugging hard on those heart strings ups the perceived value of a inanimate object and sells.

 

Like Marcia Selsor, I also like making orbs as canvas for decoration or alternative firing techniques.  Also mostly not fulfilling any function either.  There is something about taking 3-4 pounds of clay and seeing how wide, and tall, you can make something without it collapsing, that i find irrestible.

 

My functional work sells, but not nearly as well.  They probably don't have the potter's "spark" within.

 

John



#43 Jawpot

Jawpot

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts

Posted 25 March 2014 - 11:58 PM

I like to make huge show stoppers.  But I mostly get orders for large pots.



#44 clay lover

clay lover

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,131 posts
  • LocationSoutheast

Posted 26 March 2014 - 07:18 AM

What are huge show stoppers ?



#45 Jawpot

Jawpot

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts

Posted 26 March 2014 - 09:02 AM

Large highly embellished art peaces.  A lot of times I will do some glass work with them.  A show stopper will stop people and draw a crowd. 



#46 DyAnn

DyAnn

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 05 December 2015 - 02:39 PM

I like berry bowls, honey pots an tea bowls.



#47 JAW

JAW

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 05 December 2015 - 08:17 PM

I like to make large fermentation crocks, moonshine jugs, and face jugs.

 

The bulk of what we sell out of our store are mugs, bowl, and mixing bowls.

 

Our online store sells a lot of fermentation crocks and mixing bowls.

 

I have never put name cards in stuff to help people imagination. My mom runs the shop and she likes to stage stuff to help people. Like she has a few tables set up between the shelves with place settings set up with breakfast ready to be served.



#48 GiselleNo5

GiselleNo5

    Clay Addict

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 512 posts
  • LocationLos Osos, California

Posted 06 December 2015 - 07:43 PM

When I list my stuff online I try to list three possible uses for it because I have found that some people have no imagination. I don't need anybody to tell me how to use a bowl!! I've learned at in-person events to put a wooden spoon on at least one of my spoon rests because so many people were coming up to me and asking "What is this for??" I kept my answer very neutral but they always looked so embarrassed. I should start telling them, "It's a diet bowl! You put cereal and milk in it and you can only eat whatever's left!" Hee hee hee. 

sml_gallery_67168_947_202145.jpg

 

Re: the poll: I love making nesting bowl sets, and little stacking prep bowl sets. I also like making cups with handles, which are also one of my most-sold items. The other best-seller is slab-built tissue box covers. I made my own template and whenever I make a batch they sell out within a few weeks. I texture the whole thing with slip trailing and then use a nice breaking glaze. 

 

But I love the feeling of making a beautiful perfectly rounded bowl. :)


I create order from chaos. And also, chaos from order.

 

https://www.giselleno5ceramics.com/

GiselleNo5.etsy.com

YouTube-logo-full_color.png?resize=50%2C  fb_logo.png  instahack.png?1


#49 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,467 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 06 December 2015 - 08:50 PM

But I love the feeling of making a beautiful perfectly rounded bowl. :)


I often tell folks looking at wares in the booth that I've never met a round bowl I couldn't make better.

#50 GiselleNo5

GiselleNo5

    Clay Addict

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 512 posts
  • LocationLos Osos, California

Posted 07 December 2015 - 03:06 AM

 

But I love the feeling of making a beautiful perfectly rounded bowl. :)


I often tell folks looking at wares in the booth that I've never met a round bowl I couldn't make better.

 

I'll admit I'm using the term "perfectly rounded" loosely ... ;)


I create order from chaos. And also, chaos from order.

 

https://www.giselleno5ceramics.com/

GiselleNo5.etsy.com

YouTube-logo-full_color.png?resize=50%2C  fb_logo.png  instahack.png?1


#51 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,788 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 07 December 2015 - 09:14 AM

Of late I have been throwing some nice 3# bowls. I prefer bowls to dishes, for me a bowl is rounded smoothly from rim to center and back to rim on other side, no breaks in the curve, no flat spots and a round interior bottom. Anything else is a dish. I have also been cutting the feet of these with 11/2 pipe to make it so foot rings do not gather water in the dishwasher.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#52 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,349 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 07 December 2015 - 09:32 AM

 I have also been cutting the feet of these with 11/2 pipe to make it so foot rings do not gather water in the dishwasher.

 

 

I've seen you mention this before, and I wish the commercial makers would have done this years ago, because the foot rings of our dinnerware set excel at gathering water.

 

For me, a dish is in between a plate and a bowl.  It has higher, more vertical walls than a plate, but a flatter, more spread out base than a bowl.

 

Sometimes, it's all a matter of perspective.  I'll have students that say, "I was trying to make a mug, but it looks like a bowl."  I tell them, throw a handle on it, now it's a mug!


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#53 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,788 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 07 December 2015 - 10:30 AM

Yeah Ben, I would tell them it looked like a dog dish and scrap it. ONLY if it was poorly thrown, heavy, poorly trimmed or otherwise. I usually told them to keep it they had to measure and throw a lid for it. 

 

 

best,

Pres


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#54 rayaldridge

rayaldridge

    Once and future potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 487 posts
  • LocationNW Florida and the North Country of New York

Posted 10 December 2015 - 11:40 PM

What an interesting discussion!

 

Over the last few months, my favorite thing to make and the best-selling thing I make are porcelain pipes.  As I've explained before, I don't know of any other studio potters who are making pipes that are much like mine, so every step I take along that road takes me deeper into a frontier that I never suspected even existed.  When I was a young potter 40 years ago, with no responsibilities to anyone but myself, I made a lot of pipes, and sold a lot of them, because even then there was no competition to speak of.  But when I got married and we started a family, I decided that I had to leave that world behind-- too much risk of terrible consequences, and not just to me but to the innocents for whom I was responsible.

 

But the world seems to be changing, and all our kids are grown and doing well on their own, so I felt comfortable returning to the form.  And I have to tell you, it's been remarkably rewarding.  Every firing produces better results-- I'm about to bisque a load that has some stuff in it that I'm really proud of-- some effigy pipes that have a timeless quality, if I do say so as shouldn't.  I'm not a terrible potter, and I've produced pots I'm proud of in the past, but nothing has made me feel as proud as these little pipes.  The best thing is that I know I've got a lot of room for improvement before I reach even a minimal level of competence at the form.  It's exciting, especially for a potter as old as I am... to have that potential for improvement in front of me.

 

As to pricing-- that's another very interesting aspect of this form.  I recently realized that I would be unable to economically produce the pipes for wholesaling at the prices I was asking, because in many ways these pipes are as complex to make as a good teapot.  Consequently, as an experiment I doubled and in some cases tripled my prices, and discovered that at least some folks think the prices are fine, because I've sold more pipes in the last month than in the previous 6 months.

 

I've posted pics of some of these pieces in my gallery, but here's a few that I like:

 

 

 

 

Attached Files







0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users