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WildCelticRose

Doing It Backwards, Firing Cone 6, Followed By Underglaze At .06 Am I Nuts?

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I'm thinking about trying something odd...

I've been playing with underglaze (not the traditional, but Duncan Concepts) which has a lovely sheen.

I have put it on greenware, bisque fired it, then dipped in overglaze and wiped/scratched the overglaze away from the underglaze design.  I've not been fully pleased with the results (but have been super excited by the potential, espeically with bright colors under a dark overlgaze.

I've been toying with the idea of masking off the area I want to underglaze, then dipping and firing to cone 6, painting the underglaze on the unglazed area (hoping for more precision and control) and firing just to .06.

My hope is that the overglaze won't get super melty (or suffer any other bad changes) and that I'll have crisper lines...

I will be firing some test tiles, but was curious as to if anyone has ever done this and how it worked?

Thanks in advance :)

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I could be wrong, but I don't think you will have much success getting the underglaze to adhere to clay which has been fired to cone 6. What if you apply the underglaze to bisqueware, fire again to 06, use wax to mask the area where you do not want glaze, glaze and fire to cone 6. This is assuming you are using a clay that vitrifies at cone 6. The second 06 firing could probably be cooler. You just want to stabilize the underglaze.

 

I find liquid latex gives an cleaner line. Paint on the liquid latex, let it dry, apply glaze, and use a sharp hook to pluck off the latex before firing. You might find using latex gives you the clean line you are seeking without needing that second 06 firing.

 

If the real issue is a runny glaze, that is a whole other issue and not going to be fixed by any of this.

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Oh... great idea.

The Duncan Concepts do fine at the higher, second firing with the cone 6 glazes (I usually fire just shy of a full 6) and are stunning combined with a darker glaze (my current favorite, flame agaisnt a black matte); I just haven't had luck wiping or scratching the cone 6 glaze off of the bisque fired Duncan and getting consistent results.

I think the liquid latex is exactly what I need :)

Thanks

 

!

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Couldnt you just use a cone 10 body that way it is not fully mature at cone 6. It might give you some leeway in adhering the underglaze. Or you could warm the fired pot and brush/spray on the underglaze making it dry to the pot quickly. I dunno. Let us know of the results!

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While a cone 10 body is less vitrified at cone 6, it's still not porous enough to make applying the underglaze any simpler.

 

If I am understanding your goal correctly, you want the raw matte underglaze surrounded by a glossier glaze, correct? You can do all of that at once if the underglazes work at cone 6. Put the underglaze on the bisque ware, wax over it, apply the glaze, wipe any excess glaze off the waxed area, and fire to cone 6.

 

You can apply the underglazes or low fire glazes on top of already fired glazes, but it is difficult to get them to adhere, as mentioned above. Warming the pot first can help, or mix up some gelatin and apply it to the pot. Once dry it gives the overglaze something to grab onto. Because the pot is not porous with the fired glaze on it, it takes forever for the overglaze to dry. You may have to torch it.

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I've been utiliziing the previously suggested Latex 74 to protect the underglaze when dipping into the overlgaze.

The only issues I've come up with are when the overglaze floats a bit, creating less than optimal lines.

I'm going to try the suggestion to do it all at once.

I purchased a Shilloutte Cameo decal cutter and am going to place the decal on the pot, dip the bisque in the overglaze, remove and then paint the underglaze on the unglazed portion of the pottery. 

In addition to reducing steps, I am hoping that this will result in a clearer line as the undergalze would be "on top" of the overgalze in areas where there is any overlap.

I'll let you know how this turns out.

Thanks for all the suggestions thus far :)

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