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What's Wrong With Big-Runney Feet?


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#21 docweathers

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 12:51 PM

I'm definitely going to keep the big-runney feet on these pots. This is the result of overenthusiastic application of a oil spot glazes. I was told to make the pot really thin so that when I just kept piling on more and more glaze the whole thing wouldn't end up to thick. I guess on more vertical forms, one doesn't have to worry about the glaze getting too thick. Rather one just has to make sure you have enough kiln wash on your shelves.

 

Maybe with a little thought, big fat feet could be turned into a more guided and artistic process.


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#22 Timseeclay

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 02:25 PM

Doc you got to the point I would have mentioned. It comes down to intent and expectation. As a craftsperson and artist we make decisions to get us to a end goal visually and functionally. We can choose paths that leave some surprise, like the wood firing mentioned earlier. We have expectation of runs, stuck wadding and crusty bits. We may do things to encourage those. Your original intent for those pieces did not include the loss of control that contributed to a wide puddle of glaze for a foot. It was a accident and therefore a loss that gives an opportunity for reflection, growth or dismissal of the pieces. Just as I would not be happy with shiny black oilspot glazes coming out of my wood kiln. It may give me a chance for exploration but the shiny black pots would be failures. It all comes down to intent and expectation. 



#23 docweathers

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 02:41 PM

Tim

 

I like the way you formulated the idea.

 

The other part I was driving at, which some people obviously did not get, is that even though we think of ourselves as creative, unrestricted opportunists, there are implicit rules that are so automatic that we don't even notice them, like the bottom of the pot needing to be a neat little round circle with a quarter inch of raw clay showing. Most people don't even think about but it, they just do the rule. when the rule is broken the pot is bad.

 

I suspect there are a lot more of these rules that need to be uncovered.

 

By the way, I've been a fan of yours for a long time. My favorites are those brass colored pots that look like old-time workshop tools, oil cans etc. They look so real and funky that if you put one on my welding bench, I might automatically try to use it.

 

Larry


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#24 Timseeclay

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 07:08 PM

Thanks Larry,

 

So much of what lurks in our pottery subconscious is left over from those beginner lessons. There is so much information when explaining how to do all the steps to making competent pottery, that often why we do the steps is forgotten or eliminated. I am having my more advanced students this session making historical reproductions. They are to replicate a piece that originates in a cultural point where there is little outside influence. In doing this I hope to have them find the cultural, functional and production reasons for each attribute of the two pots they choose. To further the thought process I am including a bonus assignment of mixing the two pots and making a "pot baby"

 

After thinking about your last post we will have a conversation about many more "whys" about many more parts.

 

Thanks again Larry



#25 docweathers

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 01:02 PM

Tim

I like the way that you are prompting your students creativity with an interesting assignment that has no right answer. Are you offer any sort of marriage ceremony for the first two pots so that you do not have an illegitimate baby pot :mellow: ?

 

Unstated rules are usually buried in automatic habit patterns, which are largely invisible to us until they are frustrated... you can't get from here to there doing that.

 

Larry


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#26 Timseeclay

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 02:26 PM

Ha, I was hoping they would just put some soft music on, turn the lights down, have a nice dinner and see where it went. I wouldn't want either pot parent in a poor relationship, perhaps they would need to see other pots after some time. Oh the what my students must think of me.






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