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What's Wrong With Big-Runney Feet?


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#1 docweathers

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 05:53 PM

I tried some oil spot glazes. I was advised to just keep pouring it on thicker and thicker.  The vertical surfaces of my pot were very nice but a good portion of the glaze slid off onto my kiln shelf making a very organic foot at some points an inch and a half wide.

 

At first it was "ah my what a mess. How am I going to chip or grind this stuff off." Then I began to look at the color, shape and patterns. They are really very pretty but against the rules.

 

The rules seem to say that the upper part of a pot can be twisted, lumpy, bumpy, organic, distorted etc. but the bottom always needs to be a neat little round circle with a quarter inch clay showing.

 

Why?

 

 


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#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 06:22 PM

Pot with "neat little round circle with quarter inch clay showing", $15; oil spot pot with organic globules, priceless. Sometimes the "rules" for functionality and art overlap; sometimes, they do not. Sounds like you got a racer. Enjoy it.

#3 Chris Campbell

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 08:21 PM

There's a rule book???

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#4 Mark C.

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 08:48 PM

The rule is do not let your pot cut someone-other that that its wide open.

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#5 docweathers

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 09:24 PM

Ah, but there must be a rule or the like if everyone is uniformly abiding by the standard. :)  I have never seen one pot displayed that has a big runny mass around the foot. I can't be the only one who has gotten one of these. Maybe, I'm just the only one who took a close look at it before they grounded it off, broke it off or threw it in the trash barrel. What kind of a artist/craftsman could you be if you make such a mess.?

 

My point is, I wonder how these implicit standards impact our artistic judgment.

 

I actually have three of these things that I really like. I am going to find more ways of taking advantage of this Bigfoot mess. :rolleyes:


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#6 bciskepottery

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 10:02 PM

Doc . . . you are not alone.

 

http://ncclayclub.bl...-spot-bowl.html



#7 JBaymore

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 10:12 PM

Doc,

 

You need to look at more woodfired anagama youhen and haikaburi works.... and at more pots in Japan.

 

As a woodfirer... I live by the grinder.

 

That being said... the character of the foot area has to resonate with the character of the rest of the piece.  And as was said...... not cause personal injury .

 

best,

 

.....................john


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#8 docweathers

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 11:05 PM

I really like the double hanging knob pot. I have two bench grinders. I've never been hesitant to use them, until now.

 

I've attached a couple of pictures of the pots I'm talking about that have really serious big runny feet.  Please excuse the primitive photography but I'm so new at pottery, I haven't put together a good glare free photo box yet. From these photos, it is hard to see the patterning of the feet and how it works with the pot.

 

Thank goodness I use tons of kiln wash on my shelves. :rolleyes:

 

 

Attached Files


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#9 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 08:01 AM

I always liked frozen drips. I have seen many controlled to be higher up on the pot. I think your main concern is that they should not have sharp edges that could cause injury....for which you are liable.
Take a file or some "wet" emery paper and sand any dangerous edges and spare yourself a lawsuit.
Meanwhile, more control to place suspended drips above the foot might save you a lot of work.You really don't want a glaze pool to chip in someone's hand.


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#10 Diane Puckett

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 06:48 PM

I thought of John Britt's oil spot bowl as soon as I read this post. There is a nearly identical, albeit much older, bowl in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.
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#11 Benzine

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 08:37 PM

I recently finished a multi-sectioned vase for a friend.  I used a glaze combination, that I hadn't really tried before, but guessed would turn out well. 

It did indeed look nice, but the two layered, ran more than I anticipated.  I did have the piece stilted, so I had some frozen drips on the bottom. 

So, they become the new foot/ feet for the piece.  It sat pretty level despite this.


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#12 Frederik-W

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 06:42 AM

In Art there are no rules.

There are guidelines yes (but you don't have to follow them), and there is bad taste, there is pretention, there is rubbish etc, but no rules. Some things just break all the rules but the way it hangs together is just beautiful or meaningful. Do not let pedantic people who are set on rules cramp your creativity.

 

For craft things are a bit different, especially if you work within a tradition. If you make pots in a certain cultural style or tradition then you have to follow the customary rules (most of the time).



#13 docweathers

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 12:08 PM

This discussion reminds me of some things that Michael Palin said in one of his food books when discussing natural, whole Earth, organic foods. He calls them "story foods" because it is the story on the bottle and the picture of idyllic farm scenes on the front that makes them sell. He went looking for the maw and maw farm pictured on the label  and found industrial scale farming. So the manufacturer was well aware of the utility of this myth.

 

So maybe you can have any kind of foot that you can conjure a great story for. "it's an ancient Russian technique that requires you to coat the shelves with ground-up pigs ears and make your glazes with juice from sauerkraut rather than water. But the cabbage has to be from the Ukraine and grown in nuclear waste". <_<


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#14 Bob Coyle

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 07:31 PM

They look great Doc. Clean the bottom edges up with a Dremal and put them out for sale. If the slumped glass people can do it , why not potters??

 

If worse comes to worse, you can use them in one of your metal pieces.



#15 docweathers

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 08:02 PM

To grind the pot bottom of these pods, the I use my el Cheapo ($20)   bottom grinder. Then I have an electric skillet with a quarter inch of paraffin in it that I get very hot and give the bottom a quick dunk. Then wipe it off with the rag. Between the grinder, which does a pretty good job and the paraffin on the bottom of the pot has a scratch free surface.

 

I actually use this on all of my pots. It is a lot easier than felting and seem to do a very good job


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#16 Chantay

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 08:24 PM

Doc,  I like the pots. I actually own a runny, drippy pot of john Britt.  He told me that if a drip gets broken off he will refire enough for the sharp edge to smooth back out. Not sure how but he would be glad to tell you.


- chantay

#17 Wyndham

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 01:01 PM

Back in the day, Harding Black had the same issue with heavily glazed pots running. Harding made biskets of fireclay a bit wider than the pot and about 1 in thick, to catch the drips. IFB cut into slabs works very well. Coat the slabs with kiln wash and get ready to grind.

I use an edge grinder from HF with a diamond wheel, goes rather quickly and it saves the shelves.

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#18 docweathers

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 11:00 PM

what is IBF?

 

... But I like some of my funny big feet. :unsure:


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#19 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 07:41 AM

Insulating Fire Brick IFB
Herbert Sanders also used that method for crystalline glazes which run notoriously as part of the process.These were cut to fit the pot which was bisque fired to ^10 and sprayed with glazes using a gum solution.
BTW the gum solution works well for when you accidentally over fire bisque.
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#20 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 01:56 PM

Never really ventured into this side of the forum but what a lovely mistake  :) I would just keep it to admire.

 

I thought the "standard foot" was mostly used to lift the form of the pot from the surface, or at least that is what I use it for. Gives the shape a little bit of breathing space (and removes some of my heavy throwing at the bottom).

 

 

I really like the double hanging knob pot. I have two bench grinders. I've never been hesitant to use them, until now.

 

I've attached a couple of pictures of the pots I'm talking about that have really serious big runny feet.  Please excuse the primitive photography but I'm so new at pottery, I haven't put together a good glare free photo box yet. From these photos, it is hard to see the patterning of the feet and how it works with the pot.

 

Thank goodness I use tons of kiln wash on my shelves.  :rolleyes:

 

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