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Ooops...i Forgot To Sign My Pot.

signing

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#1 hershey8

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:09 PM

Well, I bisque fired a small load of cone 6 bowls, and only one bottom blew off.  So that one won't be a problem to sign, because with no bottom, signing is not an option. But, I'm wondering, how in heck will I sign my name on to the rest of the bowls? I could use a laundry marker, but....naw. How would a savvy potter sign a pot after bisqueing (is that even a word, doesn't look right) or even after firing to completion?  I'm guessing you wouldn't use a glaze, as that would stick the pot to the shelf (I'm catching on). But how about a stain or a slip that has been modified to stick to bisque? Any thoughts. Thanks, john autry (Hershey8 is my dog...Woof!...he thanks you too.



#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:36 PM

Use a mix of red iron oxide and water, sign on bottom with a brush.  Or, after glaze is done, sign with a Sharpie.



#3 Min

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:38 PM

There are a lot of good ideas in this link: http://community.cer...le-marking-pen/  or you could use a ceramic pencil.

 

Min (my dog Lou says hi to Hershey8, that's him, not me, in my avatar : )



#4 hershey8

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 06:37 PM

Use a mix of red iron oxide and water, sign on bottom with a brush.  Or, after glaze is done, sign with a Sharpie.

I was hoping you would say this, because it had crossed my mind. I wasn't sure if the oxide would set up or not. Thanks for the solution. ja



#5 hershey8

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 06:39 PM

There are a lot of good ideas in this link: http://community.cer...le-marking-pen/  or you could use a ceramic pencil.

 

Min (my dog Lou says hi to Hershey8, that's him, not me, in my avatar : )

Thanks for the link, Min. I'll check it out. ja



#6 Pres

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 09:07 PM

I had to add some special info on a pot this week for a baptism. I used a glass marker that bakes for 40 minutes to 375F. This made it pretty easy to add the text without the hassle of doing the text on the two pieces I made for the customer to choose one. I know, I know, but good people.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#7 PSC

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 10:48 PM

Underglaze pencil works fine.

#8 TJR

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 09:45 AM

I sign all my work with a brush and black stain, after they are glazed. Iron oxide with a tiny bit of Albany slip also works.

Do not use cobalt oxide as it stays on the shelves in reverse.oops!

TJR.



#9 timbo_heff

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 02:05 PM

Definately the underglaze pencil: it will become permanant when you do the glaze fire:

http://www.sheffield...L-p/augpbla.htm



#10 Mart

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 04:31 PM

Truth is, nobody really cares about your signature until you become famous. Did you notice, I use the word "famous" and not "good" because "famous" has nothing to do with good.
Until you become "famous" and hopefully "good", signed or not, makes zero difference.

I only sign pieces I personally like (seriously like and I feel proud of). It has NOTHING to do what customers like.
I believe that the most important tool in every potters shop is the hammer. You need to develop brutal self criticism to evolve above mediocrity. To get there, use that hammer of yours as often as you can.

#11 ayjay

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 12:33 PM


I believe that the most important tool in every potters shop is the hammer. You need to develop brutal self criticism to evolve above mediocrity. To get there, use that hammer of yours as often as you can.

Foul!  :o

 

I'm a carpenter, I have too many hammers.  :D

 

Communal firing means I have to sign mine,  (although I do also sign what I make at home - it's just habit now) I know I'll never be famous.



#12 MichaelP

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 09:51 AM

 

Communal firing means I have to sign mine,

 

As Mart says, sign the pieces you like. Communal firing just increases the number of those, especially, if you chose a right community. ;) 



#13 phill

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 03:08 PM

I use Barnard Clay as a watery slip when I make glaze test tiles, and I brush it on the bottom of the bisqued tiles. It never has come off on the shelving.

#14 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 07:38 AM

I like to sign my worst pots with a hammer  :huh:



#15 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 08:29 AM

I sign my pots when I finish bisque firing.I use a porcupine quill. I use a hammer later if they aren't leaving the shop.
I agree with Pres, just get an underglaze pencil. I use those to mark test tiles.Sign the bisque surface. Hammer later if need be.

Marcia

#16 annekat

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 11:28 AM

I worked for some professional potters with high quality work who always signed their work with a Sharpie, after the glaze firing. It was black Sharpie on brick red clay, and it looked fine. There are lots of colors of Sharpies these days, including ones that look like iron oxide.

 

For special projects, I've used a Pen-Touch gold pen, quick dry metallic ink, permanent. A little nerve wracking hoping you don't make a mistake, but results were great. This was a long time ago, and there are probably more options now.

 

For my general work, I still use the method of signing into leather hard greenware with a dulled wooden knife. Gives a softer line than a sharp wooden knife. When I occasionally forget to sign, which is rare, then I use a Sharpie, but really prefer that all my signing look the same.


Anne





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