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Lighten A Glaze?


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#1 ayjay

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 02:25 PM

I mixed a glaze; I quite like it as it is for some things, but in general terms it's definitely a little darker than I would like when it's been fired.

 

Is there a tried and trusted method to make it lighter?

 

Options I've considered so far (in order of what I expect to be the most effective) include mixing a further batch of the base with no colourants and adding that to the original mix or just adding some Tin Oxide or some Titanium Dioxide.

 

 If it helps, the colourants involved are RIO @1% and Iron Oxide Yellow  (so, more RIO  :rolleyes: )  @3% .

 

Any suggestions?



#2 Babs

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 03:47 PM

 Reducing the iron content,  cheaper by far than increasing tin and titanium.

Adding a further batch with no colourants may end you up with a bigger bucket of glaze that you're not that happy with because that would be, no mathematician here, a big reduction in all colourants. Ah it's a testing time this pottery!



#3 perkolator

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 03:57 PM

putting it over a white clay body or white slip will lighten it up too.  

 

tin and titanium will definitely lighten it up, but there are many others that don't cost as much.  the only issue i could see with using an opacifier is that there is a chance your actual glaze texture may change depending on how much you add, since opacifiers can sometimes make the glaze go toward matte.

 

what's the quantity of glaze you're trying to alter?



#4 ayjay

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:49 PM

I already use a white body, and this is a fairly matt glaze, being more matt would be fine.

 

It's only a small quantity, 1000gms dry, (i don't produce enough to make gallons of glaze).



#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 07:54 PM

Your first inclinations were right on. Mix a batch without colorants to dilute the color.

Marcia

#6 Babs

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 09:34 PM

May want to do a series of rates of 'dilution" of "colourless" batch to existing batch to get the lightness you're after, then work back mathematically to mix up future batches of  the glaze you're happy with.



#7 ayjay

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 03:54 AM

Thanks everyone.

 

I shall mix a full size batch and start by adding 50% of that to the original - once I've get it right any leftovers will have a complementary colour added and I'll have two glazes which I know will definitely play nicely together. B)



#8 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 05:43 AM

you can mix one batch of colorless glaze and do a line blend.5:1, 5:2, 5:3 etc.

Marcia

#9 ayjay

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 04:51 PM

you can mix one batch of colorless glaze and do a line blend.5:1, 5:2, 5:3 etc.

Marcia

What the heck!  I'm going to do it, (the next time it's raining).  ^_^



#10 Mark C.

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 10:30 PM

You can mix glaze even when its sunny.

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#11 Babs

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:23 AM

YEH it can lighten your whole life when you get the one you want!



#12 ayjay

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:35 AM

I have too many other pursuits  to follow when the sun is shining, all outdoor and far more enjoyable when it's not raining. Pottery fits in nicely around that.



#13 Babs

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:57 AM

Get on with them! You may come back to your pots so fulfilled that you feel no need to alter anything! :rolleyes:






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