Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Kohaku

Ethics Of Selling Repaired Raku Forms

Recommended Posts

Kohaku    22

Unless you are mixing your clay from scratch, adding kyanite would not be evenly distributed.

Can you tell us what else you are doing? How you prepare? Do you wait a day after glazing.

Are you dunking the pieces in water?

Peipenburg's clay is good.What clay are you using?

You can get raku clay with fine grog so that it is smooth.

Give us more detail about your procedures and your clay body.

 

Marcia

 

I planned to mix the kyanite it using the slap and cut method (40 rounds). My impression was that this did a pretty good job of mixing- let me know if I'm wrong.

 

In terms of clays- SPS (where I shop) has several Raku clays, but all have a significant grog component. On their recommendation, I've tried both Alpine white and Sea Mix with sand.

 

I also use Helmer Kaolin (mixed and sold by local Wendt Pottery). I've detected no real difference between fracture rates across these different clays, and Helmer is by far the nicest in terms of throwing.

 

I'd be delighted to try a commercial Raku clay with a finer grog if you have any recommendations... although shipping could be a deterrent (I have family in the Seattle area, so SPS is a convenient stop).

 

In terms of prep, I always pre-glaze at least a day before firing. For delicate pieces, I do a very slow gradient on the temperature.

 

I do not dunk my work- although (glaze dependent) I do 'burp' the can. I use kevlar gloves for transfering delicate pieces (no tongs).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Min    778

Plainsman Clay makes a Raku body that uses fairly fine mullite grog, not the usual firebrick or fireclay grog. A link to the info on it is here: http://plainsmanclays.com/data/RAKU97.HTM  There is a sieve analysis at the bottom of the page. Plainsman is very good about answering questions and technical support, Tony Hansen of Digital Fire is involved with their clay composition and testing.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marcia Selsor    1,301

Have you tried using paper clay?

It fires well in Raku.I had a ton special mixed by Seattle Pottery Supply. Maybe they would special mix Peipenburg with fine grog for you.

 

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kohaku    22

Marcia... I've made some of my own paper clay for doing repairs... but my impression was that it didn't throw well. It's something I've been meaning to experiment with more.

 

It's probably worth talking to SPS... although I've often found my interactions with them to be a bit... 'special'. (Whole separate topic there).

 

Min- thanks for the tip on Plainsman's clay. I wish there was a distributor a bit closer than Helena... but I do need an excuse to visit the Archie Bray facilities.

 

I just wedged a round of kyanite into some clay this AM, and I'll be forging ahead with a few experiements...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JBaymore    1,432

A very wise woman once said:

 

Here is a question for you that might be your answer.

Think of a potter whose work you admire and whom you respect a lot.
Picture someone showing him the piece above as an example of the quality of work you make.

How would you feel?
Every piece of work you put out in the world carries your name and makes your reputation.

If you put that much time and energy into the carving STOP raku-ing them ... Get yourself a more predictable firing process.
All the raku special effects get nuked in the sunshine anyhow and it's not hard to simulate black raku crackle post firing.
My advice is to stop throwing away all the time and energy you put into surface decoration.

 

best,

 

......................john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Idaho Potter    62

Kohaku,

 

I use Coleman raku (firing range 06 to 10) and it is fine grained. (It's from Clay Art Center)  It also is endurable during the kiln to smoke pot,   I don't do much by way of carving, but think this would work well if you are sticking to raku firing.  Your work is so beautiful, I'm kind of with Chris--try another firing technique.  If it's the luster quality in raku that attracts you, a second firing and you can have your lusters on a well vitrified clay.  B-mix without grog is smooth as butter and carves very well.

 

Shirley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kohaku    22

Kohaku,

 

I use Coleman raku (firing range 06 to 10) and it is fine grained. (It's from Clay Art Center)  It also is endurable during the kiln to smoke pot,   I don't do much by way of carving, but think this would work well if you are sticking to raku firing.  Your work is so beautiful, I'm kind of with Chris--try another firing technique.  If it's the luster quality in raku that attracts you, a second firing and you can have your lusters on a well vitrified clay.  B-mix without grog is smooth as butter and carves very well.

 

Shirley

 

Thanks a ton Shirley- I'll check that out.

 

I'm not opposed to alternate techniques, but I'm pretty obsessed with the mosaic effect you get when carved lines are blackened. I suppose I could get this with India ink, but that seems a bit forced to me. Suggestions are welcome... but my experiments with sagger firing aren't promising (you can get a beautiful surface... but darkening the bare areas is more problematic)

 

I also love the organic feel you get with a Raku surface... not just the luster, but the variegated color, the crackle, and the textural residue of the combustibles.

 

Honestly, I feel like there's a lifetime of possibility for me to explore... and I'd rather explore form until I figure out which shapes can handle the stress and which can't.

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×