Jump to content


Photo

Soda Ash Question & Thanks!


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,148 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 15 October 2013 - 09:56 AM

A while ago I asked for advice on buying soda ash for some tests I wanted to run on increasing surface fluxing.

 

I want to thank everyone for the advice ... got the soda ash and ran some tests and I think it will work out for me. Unfortunately two coats of the solution is a bit too unpredictable ... some areas are perfect and others are either too dull or too shiny ... and three coats make the piece way too glaze shiny ... as usual, more testing ahead.

Question #2

I think part my problem was that as the saturated solution cooled, particles started to reform ... so is the answer is to keep the solution warm enough to keep everything dissolved??


Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#2 PeterH

PeterH

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 166 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:06 AM

Chris,

 

How are you applying the solution?

 

Could it be a problem with the solution moving about within the bisque, either during the

application or while drying? Purely as an experiment you might try adding some CMC to

make a "painting" solution. Hopefully, the soda should stay close to where you applied it

-- and close to the surface -- until the firing.

 

Regards, Peter



#3 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,148 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:14 PM

I am brushing it on. The CMC idea is interesting so I am going to try using just a bit and see what happens.

I also considered adding food color so I could see where and how thick the application is because once you brush it on it just disappears.


Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#4 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,900 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 15 October 2013 - 06:31 PM

Use red food coloring........ 99% of the time it leaves no trace (test)... not so some of the other colors.

 

I mix it up in small amounts that I can use up in one application setting and keep it hot (small warmer plate). 

 

Air currents in the drying will affect where the water evaporates from on the surface... hence where the soda is deposited.  It is inherently a bit of a "variable" process.

 

best,

 

.......................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#5 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,514 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 15 October 2013 - 10:34 PM

I think brushing a watery solution will be very difficult to apply evenly. A gum solution should help quite a bit. I would start with 1 tablespoon of CMC gum to a 1/2 gallon of water. Add gum to water, let it sit overnight then blend with hand blender. Thin as needed.
Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#6 jrgpots

jrgpots

    The hands can express the soul

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 471 posts
  • LocationHurricane, Utah

Posted 16 October 2013 - 12:02 AM

If you are making narrow topped vessels like a vase, you could make an air tight lid and pressurize the inside of the vessel. This would create positive air pressure and prevent deep absorption of your soda ash solution.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users