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Kissing Pots...


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#1 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 10:21 AM

Ugh- I had my first "kissing incident".  The leaf broke off during bisque.. so I rested it in there and someone must have bumped or slammed something in the garage to cause it to tip into the other half.  They are fragile so I have to find something to separate them carefully. 

 

Can someone offer me advice? 

 

I have never made any "sculptural work" so I put a lot of time into this. 

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Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#2 Mark C.

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 10:25 AM

use a small diamond bit on a dremel tool to grind the glaze away slowly till they separate .

Mark


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#3 timbo_heff

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 10:42 AM

Diamond cut-off wheel on the dremel is a little easier to get between things. If they survive the cutting apart process, you will need to grind with the other dremel grinding tips etc.



#4 mregecko

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 10:44 AM

Agree with the dremel. I recently had a case of bear-hugging pots, and I still managed to save & refire a large piece successfully.

#5 Bob Coyle

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 12:40 PM

Since you might have to touch up the seperated pieces and fire them again, I would not cut them apart. I would fire them again with a small piece of clay underneath the corner of the pot closest to the join. Just enough so that when the glaze melts the pot tips away from the join and frees both of them.



#6 Mark C.

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 01:01 PM

Since you might have to touch up the seperated pieces and fire them again, I would not cut them apart. I would fire them again with a small piece of clay underneath the corner of the pot closest to the join. Just enough so that when the glaze melts the pot tips away from the join and frees both of them.

This is a great idea.

Mark


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#7 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 07:45 PM

I thought I posted this but it is not here... Maybe I forgot to hit post.

 

I went out today to get a dremel tool and a diamond tip. The tip didn't fit on the model i picked up so I was packing up to take it back as my 13 yr old daughter picked it up by the base.  They snapped apart. So now I have a new problem.   Should i still use the diamond tip to take this off and smooth it out or is there something else I should do?   The lid doesn't fit as well as I want it too.. and the piece sticking up keeps it from going on strait.  I have never re fired anything but while I am at it, is there something I can do about the pinholing and the parts that need heavier application or is it too vitrified to address those issues too?  Here it is 

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Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#8 bciskepottery

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 08:34 PM

You can use the Dremel to smooth the edge of the leaf; same for the shard that is on the body of the pineapple. If you choose to refire, then clean the spots well to remove fine dust and apply your glaze. Your clay body is likely vitrified, so it may take some patience to get the glaze to stick and dry. Try warming the area with a hair dryer or paint remover heat gun first. Refiring will not likely help on the pinholes; reapplying glaze to cover thin spots will likely take more time than it is worth. And, if you refire, allow for some extra space between the two -- while the kiss may have resulted from the kiln being bumped, it could also have happened because the stalk relaxed during firing.



#9 Mark C.

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:17 AM

Grind smooth the rough spots-clean them and heat work however you want to warm it-apply glaze let dry -apply glaze again.You can also gring down lid now to fit better-same deal with glazing the grind marks.

as far as the pinholes you can put glaze in them. Refire the piece and leave plenty room around it for expansion and warpage.

Mark


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#10 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:26 AM

Ok so here is the dilemma -

After Bisque firing two of the leaves broke off.  They were resting in between other leaves when they were in the glaze firing.  The reason it was on the base is because it must have bumped.  I fear that if the glaze re heats and melts, there will be nothing holding that broken leaf up.. and it will just fall off.  I was counting on the glaze to seal it on. 


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#11 Diane Puckett

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:59 AM

This poor pot sounds like it might be cursed.
Diane Puckett
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#12 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:23 PM

It is...  I wonder if I need to just paint it a like color and appreciate it for what it is... a pot I love, put a lot of work into, but mostly... LOTS of lessons! LOL


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#13 Diane Puckett

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:43 PM

If you do not need it to be waterproof and don't intend to sell it, I recommend using a Dremel to grind off any excess. Then use acrylic paint to make color repairs. After the color is the way you want it, put one or two coats of clear nail polish over the acrylic paint to add gloss. No one but you will ever notice it.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery




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