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Flw Pot Minneapolis Institute Of Arts


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#1 Brian Stein

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 10:22 PM

How do you suppose a pot like this was made? The form and the foot are fairly simple, but the "deco" lines escape me. I have attempted Teco/Grueby deco with small coils then press the edges into leaf like details with a rubber rib. However, the Wright form stumps me.

 

Also, if anyone has any info on how the Grueby pots were decorated, I would appreciate the share.

 

-Brian

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#2 Mark C.

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 01:04 AM

William Henry Grueby (1867-1925) started working at the Low Art Tile Works in Chelsea, Massachusetts. In 1890 he left Low and started making architectural pieces and in 1892 he joined Eugene Atwood to form Atwood & Grueby. That company closed and in 1894 Grueby started the Grueby Faience Company. Grueby developed his own glazes and created a matte finish, very different from the glossy glazes popular at the time. The pottery was reorganized and incorporated in 1897 under the same name, Grueby Faience Company. Pottery was made by hand and decorations were added or modeled by young girls. The company made two types of pottery—architectural tiles and art pottery. In 1907 Grueby Pottery Company was incorporated. In 1909, Grueby Faience went bankrupt. Then Grueby founded the Grueby Faience and Tile Company. Grueby Pottery closed about 1911. The tile company burned in 1913 but was rebuilt and worked until 1920. The company name was often used as the mark so it helps date a piece. The matte green glazed pieces are the most sought after today. 


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#3 Denice

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 08:21 AM

If I was trying to duplicate this Grueby pottery I would make some metal shaping tools that matched the profile of the raised areas on the pots.  You would also have to use a very fine grained clay something like B-Mix and a glaze that wouldn't obscure the detailed work. Denice



#4 PeterH

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 01:02 PM

These web pages may be of interest

http://www.pinterest...rocess-pottery/

http://www.jemericka...com/portal.html

 

Regards, Peter

 

... something slightly funny about the URLs on the site, also try

http://www.jemericka...y.blogspot.com/

 

... and this pair of photos

http://2.bp.blogspot...00/IMG_4422.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot...00/IMG_4432.jpg

from this page

http://www.jemericka...7&by-date=false



#5 Brian Stein

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 04:17 PM

PeterH,

 

Thanks for the links, that Pinterest link is killer!

 

-B



#6 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 05:54 PM

A lot of the pieces from the Arts and crafts movement were actually slip cast.
The Pinteest link is great. But just saying many of those pieces were cast.

Marcia

#7 PeterH

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 07:43 PM

Slip-casting does seem a very sensible and cost-effective method for producing this sort of item in quantity. 






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