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The Need For It To Be Understood


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#21 jrgpots

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 08:41 PM

Isn't it amazing that one simple medium, clay can act as such a "healer"?  It takes away my frustrations of life. It clears my mind.  it renews my spirit.  John put so many hours of work into the pots he made when his wife was injuried and in the recovery process. The pots gave him back balance and stress relief.  I wonder if we instill into our clay the energies that are released from our fingers.  I was talking to a potter who has made many ceramic flutes over the years.  He told me the secret to make a flute sing is to instill into the clay good energy that makes you sing.

 

Clay therapy....sometimes better than Ativan, Zoloft, Lithium, Lortab, etc.  Although I probably need to remove Lithium from the list since it is in  clay naturally too.

 

Jed



#22 oldlady

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 08:18 AM

at the fair last weekend i found a lady looking at the pot i almost did not bring.

 

she had been examining it carefully and finally asked how it was made.  when i explained that i cut the "leaves" from a piece of plastic floor mat and put them in the position she was admiring because i thought that was the way nature would have done it with real leaves, she asked "but what about the berries?".  

 

we then had a talk about the inspiration of the natural world and the fact that leaves are not always available to use "live".   my fake ones were good since they made her think about the real branches of a blueberry bush and brought good memories of a happy day with her family.  as she clutched the tray to her breast and searched among the other pots on display, i realized that the pot she had was one i had thought great when i made it several years ago, but was not my latest style so i had not intended to bring it out to the fair.  it wasn't "good enough" anymore.  

 

silly me.  now she will have two good memories, the day she picked blueberries and the sunny day she talked to a potter at a fair.  

 

just a lump of clay?  no way.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#23 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 08:43 AM

John,
That is the whole point. Good job pointing that out. As for the party, people can be cruel. That epi-point in your life was bad.Academics especially like to play one-up-manship and can be very petty and mean. I like the ceramics community because there is much less of that.As Patti Warashina said "clay is a humbling medium". We all have failures but hopefully gain from the experience.SO persevere with your chosen direction and enjoy life.
Marcia

#24 PotterGrl

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 10:02 AM

This is a great thread, and I want to sit back and read through it all when I have the time later today.

 

My MIL (mother-in-law) is a quilter. She is a fantastic quilter, I would say she is among the very best. A true artist. When asked why she doesn't sell her quilts, she simply says "I wont give them to just anyone! I only give them to those who will truly appreciate the heart and soul that I put into it. People who will care for them and appreciate them. People just wont pay what they are truly worth, they don't understand, and I'm not selling them for less than their worth. So I will continue to make them with love, and give them with love."  I've always told my children that when they sleep with Nana's quilt over them, or sit on the couch with it, it's like Nana is right there hugging them :)

 

Handmade pottery is an interesting thing in my life. Ever since I was a little girl it got into my soul, and I didn't know any potters and never tried it myself until later in life! I was just a girl, and I'd walk through potter's booths and my heart would tighten. Like I belonged there. I wanted to fill my home with pottery. I imagined the hands and hearts that made it all, yes, even when I was very young. I had a confidence issue, though, and didn't think "I" would ever be able to do that. I also didn't know how to go about doing it. Even in college I had no idea that people could take classes there, much less major in ceramics! I guess I just didn't live in or hang around an artist community.  It wasn't until I was 35yrs old, had been married for 15yrs and had 2 kids ages 9 and 13 that my brain let down it's defenses and I made a comment to my parents about always wanting to learn how to make pottery. A few months later, it was my Christmas gift from them! So I had no choice but to get over my fear and self doubt and take the class. Here I am 3 years later and I haven't missed a class since, lol. No kidding.  It's in my blood, my heart and my soul. Imagine if I had to explain this to everyone ;o)  I still consider myself a "baby potter" with only 3 years of experience, and I so look forward to (God willing) 30-40 years down the line and seeing what I'm making by then. Like everyone else has said, you just can't put a price on any of this.

 

I wish I could tell them the feelings I had when I was 14yrs old and visiting an old pottery in England. Good friends of ours owned a zoo there, and we were visiting their zoo. They had many wonderful crafts people who worked and sold within their zoo. You can imagine this quaint little zoo, and quaint shops in ENGLAND!!!! The feelings inside of me right now are welling up just thinking about it. If I could have stayed in that pottery the entire 3 week trip, I would have been the happiest 14yr old girl ever. Um...how many 14yr old girls would ever say that? ;o) I feel it to myfinger tips. So hard to explain.



#25 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 12:00 PM

I think it just gets in our blood. You think about all those possibilities and always something new to try. And I find the people are pretty nice too, for the most part.
Marcia




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