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#21 Biglou13

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 03:22 AM

I get mine from a local BBQ restaurant, also look for restaurant with wood burning pizza oven.

I'm told its mostly oak.

...?since recipe starts with a red clay, will this clay still color eg copper carbonate?
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#22 jrgpots

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 02:26 PM

That is great to know.  I may use your recipes with my Bar B Que ash then..  BTW your work is beatiful.  I took a look at your gallery.



#23 Biglou13

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 05:31 PM

Since this recipe has 33% redart? ( in my case Lizellla)

Would adding copper carb. Be futile?

I've read where some ash glazes are very runny, and others are not.
.? Do you think this one is runny? What makes some ash glazes runny and others not runny?
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#24 jrgpots

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 07:28 PM

The main fluxes are Li, N, K Rb, Be, Mg Ca Sr, Ba. Of these Na, K, Mg, Ca, Sr are in ash.  The more the flux in general the runnier the glaze.  However, grass, bamboo, tumble weeds, palm leaves, etc. are also high in Silica which tends to make the glaze harder and less runny. I guess you just try it, find out how runny and go from there.

 

I have a lot of tumble weed ash, living in the dessert.  I also have mixed hardwood ash as well as walnut ash.  I thought I would mix the tumbleweed ash with the mixed harwood to see if i can control the melting point and runnines of an ash glaze.  If anyone want tumbleweed ash.........just ask.  I 'll send you some.

 

I understand the amount of silica in the ash defines wheather that ash is considered soft, medium, or hard.

 

That being said,  I am only repeating what I have read.  So take it for what is worth.

 

Jed



#25 Biglou13

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 06:10 AM

Biglou (and all),

Good starting point.........

33.3 % washed or unwashed wood ash
33.3 % granite dust or any feldspar
33.3 % local red clay or redart

Center point of a triaxial blend. Works niceley about 95% of the time no matter the particular ingredients. Adjust slightly as needed.

best,

..........................john

http://community.cer...h-glaze-detail/

Results of above recipe

I used wood ash from BBQ restaurant
Lizella clay
Custer feldspar, and nepsy

Well turns out John b says it shouldn't work @ cone 6

Well it made a glaze..... It kinda just lays there , earthy brown sort of satin like finish part matte part shiny.
Some small black specks prolly from impurities in ash
It doesn't run. See finger mark from dipping lower left
Not what I was thinking as result but I thought it was some what a successful run.
It's a little too well behaved
I was expecting some misbehavin'

No leach tests run. Yet But no real " nasties" in this one.

I need to tweak it I think I'd like to see it a bit more glassy I think ill up the flux and see what happens and maybe some some colorants
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#26 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 01:11 PM

 

Biglou (and all),

Good starting point.........

33.3 % washed or unwashed wood ash
33.3 % granite dust or any feldspar
33.3 % local red clay or redart

Center point of a triaxial blend. Works niceley about 95% of the time no matter the particular ingredients. Adjust slightly as needed.

best,

..........................john

http://community.cer...h-glaze-detail/

Results of above recipe

I used wood ash from BBQ restaurant
Lizella clay
Custer feldspar, and nepsy

Well turns out John b says it shouldn't work @ cone 6

Well it made a glaze..... It kinda just lays there , earthy brown sort of satin like finish part matte part shiny.
Some small black specks prolly from impurities in ash
It doesn't run. See finger mark from dipping lower left
Not what I was thinking as result but I thought it was some what a successful run.
It's a little too well behaved
I was expecting some misbehavin'

No leach tests run. Yet But no real " nasties" in this one.

I need to tweak it I think I'd like to see it a bit more glassy I think ill up the flux and see what happens and maybe some some colorants

 

thanks for the update- very interesting read! I have wood ash from some ash trees (chopped down due to the  boaring beetle) and some charcoal ash as well.  


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#27 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 01:12 PM

 

 

Biglou (and all),

Good starting point.........

33.3 % washed or unwashed wood ash
33.3 % granite dust or any feldspar
33.3 % local red clay or redart

Center point of a triaxial blend. Works niceley about 95% of the time no matter the particular ingredients. Adjust slightly as needed.

best,

..........................john

http://community.cer...h-glaze-detail/

Results of above recipe

I used wood ash from BBQ restaurant
Lizella clay
Custer feldspar, and nepsy

Well turns out John b says it shouldn't work @ cone 6

Well it made a glaze..... It kinda just lays there , earthy brown sort of satin like finish part matte part shiny.
Some small black specks prolly from impurities in ash
It doesn't run. See finger mark from dipping lower left
Not what I was thinking as result but I thought it was some what a successful run.
It's a little too well behaved
I was expecting some misbehavin'

No leach tests run. Yet But no real " nasties" in this one.

I need to tweak it I think I'd like to see it a bit more glassy I think ill up the flux and see what happens and maybe some some colorants

 

thanks for the update- very interesting read! I have wood ash from some ash trees (chopped down due to the  boaring beetle) and some charcoal ash as well.  

 

One other question… If I contact a granite counter top place to see if they have dust from cutting the counters do you think that would be the same thing as granite ash or is there a more pure form? 


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#28 Wyndham

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 02:13 PM

 

The easiest ash for me to obtain is from my BBQ, Kingford briquettes. It burns to a fine dust, I do put it thru a sieve to get it finer and mix it with water to spray it on my pots. I do not wash the ash. Check out my gallery to see my ash glazed pots.
Aloha, Ken


I thought briquettes had a small amount of cement in them. Did you have to adjust your glazes to take into account for the cement?

Jed

 

I heard somewhere that it's also a bit of clay or bentonite as a binder, I don't think it's enough to matter. Looks like a good reason for some BBQ, just to test, just to test :)

Wyndham



#29 JBaymore

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 05:37 PM

You can use charcoal briquette ash for ash glazes... you just have to account for the silica and alumina that the inorganic parts of the bindwers introduce.  It's a little more "refractory" than most straight wood ashes.

 

best,

 

.......................john


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#30 JBaymore

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 05:39 PM

Granite dust is granite dust. BUT.... be aware that some cutting operations use fine silicon carbide as a cutting medium... and that gets mixed into the granite dust. Changes everything. Plus some places cut all manner of stone stuff... and that also changes everything in the dust.

 

best,

 

.........................john


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Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#31 JBaymore

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 05:40 PM

Take it to 9 Lou.  ;)

 

best,

 

...................john


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Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#32 neilestrick

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 06:33 PM

Back in my ash glaze days, I primarily used BBQ ash, which mostly came from briquettes. It was easy to get, as my friends and I all had grills and we used them all the time. It was not a fluxy as regular ash, because of the binders (as John said), but still worked very well. I was told the binders were usually clay, but from what I have found online binders can be starch, wax, bentonite-type clays, or just about anything else you can think of that's sticky. Combined with what I got out of fireplaces every spring, I had a really good supply year round.


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#33 Biglou13

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 09:14 PM

Take it to 9 Lou.  ;)

 

best,

 

...................john

will do.

 

can i change spar to nepsy and get similar effect as higher cone fire

 

or frit or talc for that matter


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#34 neilestrick

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 10:41 AM

Changing the spar to Neph Sy will help it melt lower, but probably not as much as is necessary. You may need to add some frit or Gillespie Borate to get it all the way down to 6. Might only need as little as 3%.


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#35 Biglou13

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 09:24 PM

How close is gerstley borate to Gillespie borate?
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#36 neilestrick

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 09:34 PM

How close is gerstley borate to Gillespie borate?

 

Gillespie Borate borate is a direct substitute for Gerstley, but it seems to be a bit stronger than Gerstley in the melt. I'm not sure which analysis of Gerstley they used for their formula. Gerstley is a conglomerate of minerals- Ulexite, Colemanite and Hectorite. These minerals occured in widely varying percentages, which accounted for the inconsistency in Gerstley. Gillespie uses the same 3 minerals, but blends then according to a specific formula so it's consistent from batch to batch.


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#37 Dick White

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 10:03 PM

Regarding the traditional inconsistency of Gerstley, I heard that when Laguna bought the mine and reopened it, they mined a bazillion tons of it, ground it, and put it all in a huge warehouse where they shoveled from end to end with dump loaders until it was all uniform. Thus, they now have many years supply of a consistent product. The analysis is slightly different (and published on their website) than before, but it is now a known quantity and reliable product. If anyone has heard differently, please advise.



#38 Biglou13

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 10:04 PM

Found this , Thanks

http://neilestrickga...ley-borate.html
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#39 neilestrick

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 09:17 AM

Regarding the traditional inconsistency of Gerstley, I heard that when Laguna bought the mine and reopened it, they mined a bazillion tons of it, ground it, and put it all in a huge warehouse where they shoveled from end to end with dump loaders until it was all uniform. Thus, they now have many years supply of a consistent product. The analysis is slightly different (and published on their website) than before, but it is now a known quantity and reliable product. If anyone has heard differently, please advise.

 

Yes, the current supply is supposed to be pretty consistent. We've had a lot of conversations here about Gerstley, some quite heated. I started using Gillespie when it came out and just kept with it.


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#40 Biglou13

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 07:30 AM

Added 3% GB

Can't tell from bad picture but it glassed up more , from matte ish finish.
There some more green in the throwing marks.

It's not the "ash glaze" look But still attractive and interesting glaze

Unfortunately can't do cone 9 tests.

I think I'll add some frit..... Next test

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Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
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