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Meat Grinder As Pugmill?


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#1 Phil J

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 09:04 PM

Has anyone tried using a meat grinder as a pugmill? We don't use enough clay at one time to justify even the smallest comercial model. I thinking of comercial hand grinders which are available used for about $50 around here.



#2 oldlady

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 10:10 PM

i tried this many years ago.  the metal gave way and broke.  maybe you have a stronger one.


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#3 Mark C.

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 10:38 PM

Stoneware burgers-could be a new thing-fired slow with smoke and wood chips in your electric

I can see them lining up for more.

I do not think this will work but who knows?

Mark


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#4 jrgpots

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 11:00 PM

If you try it, take out the cutter just behind the extruder plate. I would also soften the clay as much as possible to avoid the previously mentioned blow out.

Good luck. If it works, please report back.

Jed

#5 Nancy S.

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 06:39 PM

I've wondered about this myself...completely cast-iron ones can be found in the antique shops around here. I kick myself for not taking my grandmother's when I had the chance, but I wasn't into grinding beef, charcuterie, or pottery back then, and declined....



#6 TJR

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 08:38 PM

You don't need a pug mill. Just wedge, bag it up let it age and then spiral wedge. This is just one more thing to break. I say give it a pass.

TJR.



#7 Pam S

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 03:36 AM

My partner in mud thinks we need a pug mill. I can't agree as we don't recycle enough clay in a year to warrent the cost (IMHO). Now that you've brought this up, I'm thinking potato ricer! Hmm, trip to the kitchen gadet store!

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#8 Mart

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 09:39 AM

You probably do not need pug mill.

I have 2 heavy duty buckets in my studio. 10 L each. Bought form local construction/hardware store for few €. Probably made for carrying cement and garbage etc.

All the clay with grog goes to one and no grog stuff goes to other one.

When they are almost full, add water so it's covered, let it sit for a day or two, pull the stuff out, wedge, lay it out on a plaster slab to try and then wedge and then it goes back to a strong plastic bag (I reuse the bags it was sold in). As simple as that. I do that maybe once a month or even less.

I never leave clay laying around and if I can, all the extra pieces go straight back to the bag where it originated, so I do not have to throw them in to a bucket. :)

Most of the content in those buckets is from throwing wheel.



#9 Bugs

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 11:08 AM

Some of us have been recycling clay in canvas bags.  We have found it to be far better than plaster.  The clay is just placed in the bag and the bag hung up to dry.  When it begins to get somewhat firm it can be kneaded a bit.  If you are willing to watch it more closely it can be put out on a concrete driveway in the bag and will dry out much quicker. It can be turned every couple of hours.  When it is "done" the bag can be turned inside out and the clay comes out in a nice lump.  I usually take it out before it is quite as dry as it needs to be and put it in a plastic bag. 



#10 Stephen

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 09:58 AM

The other advantage to a de-airing pug mill is that it often makes it emotionally easier to toss a form that's not working and grab another ball since the recycle process is so much less hassle. 



#11 Pres

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 10:30 AM

You probably do not need pug mill.

I have 2 heavy duty buckets in my studio. 10 L each. Bought form local construction/hardware store for few €. Probably made for carrying cement and garbage etc.

All the clay with grog goes to one and no grog stuff goes to other one.

When they are almost full, add water so it's covered, let it sit for a day or two, pull the stuff out, wedge, lay it out on a plaster slab to try and then wedge and then it goes back to a strong plastic bag (I reuse the bags it was sold in). As simple as that. I do that maybe once a month or even less.

I never leave clay laying around and if I can, all the extra pieces go straight back to the bag where it originated, so I do not have to throw them in to a bucket. :)

Most of the content in those buckets is from throwing wheel.

In the winter, let it freeze in a plastic basin with drain in bottom, Bring it into heated area and let thaw-water drains off leaving pretty decent wedgeable clay.


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#12 Biglou13

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 12:17 PM

You don't need a pug mill. Just wedge, bag it up let it age and then spiral wedge. This is just one more thing to break. I say give it a pass.
TJR.

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#13 Pnutbrand

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 10:45 AM

I tried using a small hand crank meat grinder. It ended up being more of a pain then what it was worth. Ended up going with the smallest Peter pugger I could get at the time, they may have a smaller model now but idk. It handles about 25 pounds in a batch and does a wonderful job. The results and time/labor savings will out way the costs and your wrists and elbows will be appreciative, at least mine were.

#14 Phil J

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 06:35 PM

Thank you for your replies. We have a large meat grinder on order from Gander Mountain. I can't afford the cost of a comercial pug mill or the physical stress of doing it by hand.



#15 Mark C.

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 12:35 AM

Did you get a power model or manual model?

Please let us know how this works out for you-

Mark


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#16 Phil J

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 04:19 PM

it's a hand crank and on B/O right now. I'll post how it works.






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