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Looking For A Satin, Or Semi-Matt White ^6


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#1 clay lover

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 07:02 AM

Hi, All.

I have a nice gloss white that does well on texture, but am looking for a white that is not glossy .  Do you have a recipe that works well for you?  I want a soft feel and low gloss. semi opaque.

Thanks,  claylover

 

 



#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 10:03 PM

You need to state the firing temperature and the atmosphere..oxidation or reduction.
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#3 Pres

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 10:24 PM

Since I assume from your title that you are doing ^6, and that you would be doing oxidation, I would ask what opacifier are you interested in, a zinc, tin, or zircopax type.  I have a few of these, that could fit the bill.  This Waxy white is from Van Gilder. . .

Compound Empirical Custer Spar 62 Talc 8 Whiting 14 EPK 10 Zinc Oxide 6 Total in grams 100

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#4 Pam S

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 03:35 AM

These are my favorite matte glazes. Soft and silky. Cone 5/6 oxidation. The silk really depends on your kiln, so test.

White Silk:

In grams,
Dolomite 60
EPK 226
Flint (silica) 143
Gerstley Borate 135
Kona F4 300
Neph Sy 592
Talc 97.5
Whiting 128
Zinc Oxide 116

For Black Silk, add
Cobalt Oxide 20
Copper oxide 60
RIO 60

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#5 clay lover

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 05:56 AM

Thank you, all.  As the title says, I am looking for ^6, and in oxidation.

 

  Pres, I would order whatever opacifier a recipe called for, I don't know enough to have a preference.  I use glazes with those ingredients, all I know is the one with zinc in it is not dependable as to surface.

 

Marcia, I found a recipe on the CAD "33 tried and true glazes"  credited to you, titled Textured blue, but from Marcia Selsor's Waxy White'.  Can you tell me more about what Waxy White  looks like? and behaves?

 

Pam, if you are referring to down firing, I do that for other satin glazes I use, but none of them make a nice buttery white when I remove the colorants.



#6 Pres

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 08:48 AM

The reason I asked about opacifiers, is that different opacifiers effect the glaze and oxide colors differently. Tin can blush in the red range if in an atmosphere with free chromium. Zinc, acts as a flux and can dull some greens and browns. Zircopax is considered pretty inate-no coloring side effects.


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#7 GEP

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 08:53 AM

Here's one from my classroom studio, very reliable. However if you apply too thin, or fire too hot, it will go glossy:

31.6 Gillespie Borate
14 Talc
19.8 Minspar
5 EPK
29.6 Silica

5.1 Zircopax
2 Bentonite
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#8 Wyndham

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 11:29 AM

Zinc does not always play well in some glazes.This problem can sometimes be corrected by using calcined zinc in the glaze.

The old saw "Zinc kills pink" is true. Any glaze with zinc and chrome/tin will not produce pink/red glazes.

FWIW.

Wyndham



#9 Bob Coyle

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 11:29 AM

You also  might try titanium dioxide instead of zircopax. Around 5% should do it. It's pretty inert in most cone 6 glazes.



#10 clay lover

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 11:37 AM

The reason I asked about opacifiers, is that different opacifiers effect the glaze and oxide colors differently. Tin can blush in the red range if in an atmosphere with free chromium. Zinc, acts as a flux and can dull some greens and browns. Zircopax is considered pretty inate-no coloring side effects.

So does this mean that the other glazes in the kiln at the same time might be changed by the opacifier used in the white glaze??



#11 clay lover

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 11:42 AM

Zinc does not always play well in some glazes.This problem can sometimes be corrected by using calcined zinc in the glaze.

The old saw "Zinc kills pink" is true. Any glaze with zinc and chrome/tin will not produce pink/red glazes.

FWIW.

Wyndham

The glaze that is troublesome for me is from 'MC6 Glazes', Carribean Sea Green.  it can have Noxzema blue streaks sometimes and sometimes has a cottage cheesy surface.  I always use cones, the heat work is the same each time ??



#12 Pres

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 12:40 PM


 

So does this mean that the other glazes in the kiln at the same time might be changed by the opacifier used in the white glaze?? No, other glazes are not affected by the opacifier in a white glaze.  The white glaze if opacified with tin, may pick up some chromium that has gone fugitive from a pot glazed with a chromium glaze(either a green or pink glaze containing chromium).  This effect can be desirable even though uncontrollable, and some potters foster it by using tin in their whites.

 


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