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#1 DeWeese

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 12:28 PM

Was looking for any suggestions on tool brands.  There are some tools I only seem to find in kemper and would like to have a little better quality than that, specifically a fettling knife. Also if there are any brands of metal ribs, wood ribs, or a needle tool you particually like. I use dolan trim tools and like those quite a bit, looking for other tools of similar quality. Thanks so much for any info, it is appreciated.



#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 01:10 PM

I got a set of steel ribs the the Ceramics Shop in Phila. when I was ordering some Wax On and Wax Off.
I like the Dirty girls and Dr. Woo cut-off wires which seem less likely to kink.
I have made my own heavier wires.
I like the Mud tools rubber ribs for throwing , especially the lime green and the red. The colors represent the stiffness of the rib.
I am sure every one has favorites. I improvise amd make my own when I don't have what I need.

Marcia

#3 Pres

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 01:31 PM

Interestingly enough, if you are looking for a fettling knife of general purpose and stiff blade, go no further than your kitchen drawer-find an old paring knife and grind it down or file it to shape it to your needs. As far as trimming and other tools, I find a great selection by various manufactures at Bailey.


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#4 nigich22

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 05:29 PM

big fan of mud tools ribs and wires, and dirty girls wood tools myself.



#5 Nancy S.

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 07:06 PM

I third the recommendation for Sherrill Mudtools ribs. The red ones are lovely for burnishing, compressing, and smoothing work, while the stiffer ones are great for scraping and don't get the rough edges like the Kemper ribs do.

 

Other than that, I'm still using the el-cheapo set of tools I bought in '96 and a bunch of repurposed kitchen supplies....



#6 Benzine

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 08:44 PM

Yeah, I've been using the same base set of tools since college.  Most are Kemper, or some other relatively cheap brand.  They have all had many hours of use, with very little sign of wear.  So I really don't see a reason to pay more, for a tool.  Hell, if these same sets of tools can hold up to a bunch of high school students using them, I think they are a bargain. 


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#7 Mark C.

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 11:28 PM

The mud tools especially the ribs are great-the bow cutter is gtreat also-these tools are a cut above the rest.

Mark


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#8 DeWeese

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 10:10 AM

Thanks everybody for the tips and info.



#9 JBaymore

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 12:23 PM

I make a lot of the tools that I use,...... many others are fron Japan. Good tools are important. Most important however are the hands that hold the tools.

best,

...........john
John Baymore
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#10 Pam S

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 03:19 AM

Mud Tools are great. We/I have started making some of our own as well as altering every day objects. I constantly get these pretend credit cards from American Express. They make great ribs! You can also cut shapes for trimming.

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#11 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 07:22 AM

I still have a rose wood french finger tool I got in 1966 for a s-d class. It is an elegant tool for throwing while closing in the lip of an orb form.Some tools are really treasures and a joy to work with. I got a more modern french finger with a group of tools but it is twice as thick as my old one.I have some home made wooden ribs and I got a small wooden rib at NCECA last year for free that I have been using for the inside of orbs.I am a tool hound.
This tool is one I use for pulling pieces for horse hair and rolling the pot on sand. I was chipping some so I added some fiber wrapped in fine Kanthal wire. It works well.

Marcia

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#12 oldlady

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 06:09 PM

a friend made me a series of discs from walnut.  they run from about 4 inches to about 8 inches in diameter.  throw a cylinder, insert rib and presto, a round bowl emerges.


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#13 Benzine

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 09:20 AM

I make a lot of the tools that I use,...... many others are fron Japan. Good tools are important. Most important however are the hands that hold the tools.best,...........john


When I first read this, I was going to joke about me picturing you heating, folding and hammering metal to create your tools. Then I read your post in another topic, about you being a iaidoka. Now I'm almost certain, that is indeed how you make your tools.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#14 MichaelP

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 11:27 AM

Then I read your post in another topic, about you being a iaidoka.

I've never heard this word, so after reading your post I google it. One of the first links says: "...iaidoka will usually use bokken for such kata practice".

 

Now the term is crystal clear to me. :) I'm going to use bokken next time I kata piece of clay.



#15 JBaymore

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 12:02 PM

I assume that pun was intended.

Off topic........

Iaido is the study of Japanese swordsmanship. An Iaidoka is a practitioner of Iaido. Kata are movement patterns that relate to potential combat situations. Actually ..... in Iaido the use of a bokken (wooden sword) is less common than the use of an Iaito (unsharpened training katana) or a shinken (sharp katana). Bokken are used when in a "sparring" situation where the use of a metal blade would be dangerous (to say the least).

NO...... I don't make the metal for my tools <g>.

Back on topic.........

best,

...................john
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#16 MichaelP

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 04:24 PM

John,

 

With all those new words you made me want to grab a shinken and do harakiri.

 

Sayonara sensei!



#17 JBaymore

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 04:42 PM

With all those new words you made me want to grab a shinken and do harakiri.


Wakizashi or tanto are better tools for seppuku when you can't stand the shame of not knowing the words. (I no longer have access to smileys...... or any of the post editing tools?????)

best,

................john
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Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#18 justanassembler

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 07:09 PM

bison trimming tools--phil is an artist as a toolmaker, and the tools function as nicely as they look.



#19 MichaelP

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 10:17 PM

 

Wakizashi or tanto are better tools for seppuku when you can't stand the shame of not knowing the words. (I no longer have access to smileys...... or any of the post editing tools?????)
 

 samurai-suicide-smiley-emoticon.gif



#20 Mark C.

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 01:16 AM

bison trimming tools--phil is an artist as a toolmaker, and the tools function as nicely as they look.

I love my 3  custom double ender bison tools-these are not for everyone but if clay is your living and you do  a lot of triming they pay for themselves right away-I have worn thru 3 of them so far. Thats why I have three so when ones toast (worn out)Phil can put new ends on while I work the other one-and always have a spare.

Mark


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