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Weight/size Charts?


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#1 akin4843

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 02:54 PM

Does anyone know of any good weight/size/measurement charts for different types of pots? My ceramics teacher used to have a chart that listed the type of pot (mug/cereal bowl/pitcher, etc), how much clay to use (in lbs.), and how tall & wide each piece should be. I kick myself when I think how I should have copied that stuff down b/c I can't find anything anywhere similar. There are a few sites that have them put the weight is in oz. & ml. I would like something that lists how many lbs. b/c that's how my scale is. I am just starting out on my own, having already graduated and I would find this pretty handy to have. Thanks in advance...



#2 JLowes

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 03:23 PM

I believe this link will help you:

 

http://www.lakesidep...ottery-ware.htm

 

You should be able to select the text, copy and paste it to a text file, or maybe that PDF I attached will be downloadable.

 

I think, but not certain, that there is something similar in a Robin Hopper book, Functional Pottery. It might even be the same chart.

 

John

Attached Files



#3 neilestrick

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 03:34 PM

IMO, there are too many factors to say definitively how much clay should be used for each form. It all depends on what size you want the pot to be, how thin you throw, and the shrinkage rate of your clay. Many years ago I spent a great deal of time working out a chart like that, and today it's not very accurate. I now use a different clay body, and I throw thinner than I used to. Take the time to make your own chart. It'll be well worth the effort, at least for a few years. But it's easy enough to modify the chart as your throwing style changes.

 

The chart JLowes posted isn't even close to what I use on most of those forms. 4 1/2 pounds for a teapot? That's one massive teapot. 5 3/4 pound pitcher? To big to pass around the table when it's full. 1 1/2 pound mug is closer to 20 ounces. Those are some thick pots they're making.


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#4 JLowes

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 05:11 PM

I yield to the superior throwing skills of Neil. 

 

When I was beginning this fun trek I would have been amazed to use the low amounts in the chart.  Now my bride will make me hammer things that weigh more than she thinks I am capable of, but maybe she hasn't seen this chart.

 

John



#5 Idaho Potter

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 05:44 PM

I have a chart from CAD that was made by Robin Hopper.  I've used it for about three years for students, and have told them to add 1/2  lb. to 3/4 lb to what the chart has listed, because they can't yet throw as well as Robin.  Making your own chart sounds like the best idea, because so much depends on the type of clay and your expertise. 

 

Start with a pound of clay and see how large a cylinder or bowl you can pull.  Move up to two pounds and take note of the results.  Start throwing lidded containers and making note of TOTAL amounts for body and lid.  Same for teapots, include all parts.  Remember, if you are making a cereal bowl, you can make it thinner than if you are making a large mixing bowl which needs to be thicker to withstand the beatings it will have to handle.

 

Shirley



#6 Diane Puckett

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 06:11 PM

Hopper's book, Functional Pottery has that info and is in general a wonder resource.
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#7 TJR

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 06:28 PM

I agree with Neil. Those weights are massive.

Mug..3/4 to 1lb

Cereal bowl..2and1/2 lbs

M edium bowl..3.25

Large bowl,, 5lbs

Plates.........5lbs

Teapots, 2 and one quarter lbs

Jars...2and1/2 lbs, and moving to larger increments.

TJR.



#8 bciskepottery

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 06:55 PM

Page 6. 

 

http://ceramicartsda.../10/cadbg10.pdf



#9 Benzine

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 10:00 PM

In the past, I used a pound and a half for my larger mugs.  But as I've gotten better, and thrown thinner, I have found that to be too much, and I usually end up trimming quite a bit off the top.  So the mugs end up being closer to a pound.

 

With that said, I like the chart, and it might be something helpful to hang in my classroom, to give the students, a general idea.


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#10 Pres

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 11:06 PM

I have seen several size charts over the years, and most give an approximation. Remembering that the size of an item is base on the density and the wetness of the clay, and the skills of the potter. I used to think that throwing eggshell thin pieces was a sign of a good potter, and then I tried drinking out of those eggshell thin mugs of ^6 stoneware finding that they would get too hot, would get cold too quick, and the rims had to have special care to make them comfy. Even the weight of the mug with coffee in it seemed off. So I forced myself to not throw so thin, and found I liked the functional pieces better that way. Start with a size chart, and figure where things go from there for yourself.


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#11 akin4843

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 12:09 AM

Thanks for the replies everyone. The reason I want the chart is purely for reference, not as an end-all/be-all. Sometimes when I'm throwing (let's say a mug with 1.5 lbs of clay), I often wonder if that's an appropriate amount b/c I find everything I throw to be too small once it comes out the kiln. The charts you guys have linked are essentially the same chart I found through google and it really confuses me b/c of the oz. My scale doesn't have oz. and I wonder why you would need to get something down to the oz. anyway. If it's 14 oz. then why not just say 1 lb. (close enough for me, anyway). I will look up that book Dianne mentioned and see what that's about. I just like having a reference around is all since I'm a total beginner and don't have the skill to even throw 4 lbs of clay (yikes).



#12 Mark C.

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 12:46 AM

The best way to do this list is weigh then throw and look what turns out.

I have a form list on the wall at wedging table with wieghts-my one developed over time

My mugs for example are 3/4# and 1 #(the standard) 1 1/4 # and 1 1/2 # and huge ones at 2#

 

Your may be a different weight as your throwing skills and style may vary.Get a better scale(more accurate)

The list you want is only for you. Keep throwing till its 2nd nature then work on such a list.

Mark


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