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Coyote Glaze 10Lb Size

How much does it make?

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#1 Pugaboo

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 09:52 PM

I have decided to go with Coyote White in a large size but am not sure how big to go and how much the different weights of dry glaze makes.

How much glaze does the 10lb bag of Glaze make once mixed up?
Also how much does the 25lb bag make once mixed?
Since its just me here and it could take awhile to use once mixed do they have a shelf life?

Thanks!
T
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 10:42 PM

from Coyote . . .

 

COYOTE DRY GLAZE MIXING INSTRUCTIONS

 

 

Quick facts:

 

10 Lbs. of dry glaze needs approximately one gallon of water (every glaze is different, check the label) and will yield about a gallon and a half of glaze.

 

25 Lbs. of dry glaze needs approximately two and a half gallons of water and will yield between three and four gallons of glaze.

 

Quick mixing instructions:

 

Wear an appropriate respirator and gloves, and use adequate ventilation when mixing.

 

Measure the amount of water recommended on the label (or just a bit less) into a clean bucket.

 

Slowly add the dry glaze while stirring continuously. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bucket and mix thoroughly.

Screen through a 60 mesh sieve.

 

Dip and fire a test piece; if too thick, add a little bit of water and retest.

 

About our glazes:

 

When mixed with water, Coyote dry glazes are suitable for brushing, pouring or dipping, and do not require the addition of any suspension or brushing ingredients; if they need it, it's already in there.

 

Because most of our dry glazes include CMC and bentonite they may take a little longer to dry than you are used to with dipping glazes, but they dip very well, stay suspended in the bucket and can also used for brushing. At Coyote Clay School & Studios we dip everything, with excellent results.

 

More good information:

 

Don't be tempted to add more water than is suggested on the label without testing! Every glaze is different, and each label has a suggested water content for that glaze. Some of our glazes will be quite thick when mixed according to the instructions on the label. Glazes that work best with a thicker application will be thicker in the bucket, and glazes that work well with a thinner application will be thinner.

 

Some of our glazes, especially the Mottled Glaze series, gel when left undisturbed. Mix them vigorously and they will thin out with no additional water. We highly recommend a drill with a mixing attachment for mixing glazes.



#3 Mark C.

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 12:46 AM

Most Glaze has an almost forever shelve life-I have set aside buckets for over 15-20 years rehydrated them and put them back in service

Now that coyote glaze may break your bank account buying in large quantities and you will not be able to afford another shelve.

Mark


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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#4 Biglou13

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 07:34 AM

Curious to why you don't make your own glaze?
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#5 pjc0602

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 08:57 AM

Hi Pugaboo,

 

I use Coyote glazes & 25lbs makes about 3/4 of a 5 gallon bucket. If you mix all of it & don't use it right away, you could just stir it from time to time.

Good luck!

 

Pam



#6 neilestrick

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 12:03 PM

Those measurements are really interesting. I mix my glazes in 8500-9000 gram batches, 18-20 pounds, and get an almost full 5 gallon bucket. The Coyote glazes must be quite low in clay and feldspar, high in frit. No wonder they're so expensive.


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#7 Pugaboo

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 02:31 PM

Biglou - I'm very new to pottery and am still learning about the different chemicals and what they mean to make my own glazes. Basically I'm too chicken to do it yet.

I bought a couple of the Coyote test glaze sets and some pints of Amaco glazes and have been playing with them. Now that I am getting a bit better at having the forms work I want get a couple basic glazes that I find I use a lot in larger amounts now. The 2 glazes I know I use a lot are Coyote gloss White and Amaco Zinc free glossy clear. Since I paint a lot of designs on with underglazes these 2 glazes make the nice basic beginnings of a glaze stable. Oldlady sent me some little sample packets of a couple powdered glazes along with the recipes to try and that's what I will mix up first when I am brave enough. She says its very easy but again I should have feathers not hair lol. 6 months ago I didn't know what RIO meant that's how basic my knowledge was. I now know what Gerstley Borate, Alumina, RIO and mason stains are and how mason stains and RIO are different. Feldspar, frit etc I am still working on. Give me another 6 months and I hope I'll be brave enough and knowledgable enough to start trying out some of the glaze recipes I have gathered from the forum.

T
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#8 Biglou13

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 06:09 PM

I'm pretty new also.
I've made my own glaze, and just recently clay from scratch.
It's easy. It ain't rocket science.
Jump in the water is fine.
If its from a good source chances are its well tested.
The first glaze I made 1000 gm. And local pottery supply had all o needed and in small quantities

 

you dont need knowledge as much as you need 5 gal buckets!


Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#9 Pugaboo

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 09:59 PM

Biglou- LOL you my friend are a very brave potter! Maybe I'll get my toe wet, the little one not the big one I ain't that brave! I guess I could try mixing up one of these packets oldlady sent me after all I can always call her up and pester her with my million questions as I mix. No pottery suppliers within 2 1/2 hours of me so anything will have to be ordered in once I start mixing. You are right I am already planning my approach to the local ice cream shop and the bakery to see if they have buckets they would like "recycled".

T
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#10 Biglou13

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 05:00 AM

Sandwich shops - pickle buckets. Asian/Chinese food- soy sauce buckets. I ask at the places I eat at all the time. Otherwise a new one is only a few dollars. But I've realized including me , most potters are frugal
I also purposefully picked recipes with minimal amout of ingredients. My glaze has 4 , my clay has 6. (Using some from glaze) I suppose I was operating on a fear factor but limited my potential loss to a few ingredients. I'm ready to dive in deeper make more glazes and make different clays.
I'm somewhat proud of my Very small "library" of ceramic materials.
I feel like a mad chemist when mixing stuff in back yard, with mask on. If neighbors ever saw me they would call the police thinking "breaking bad".

Fear factor......while not really directly related to glazes it is inherently related at a deeper level.

As artists and crafts persons we have to embrace that fear daily.

I know.some,one that has complete studio including kiln. They don't use and kiln has never been fired. Out of fear? Probably. This persons skill on wheel also is very weak ......again from fear? Probably..... It's really frustrating for me to see my friend like that. But when I was in art school,I saw it many times. People so afraid of failure that the only barely dipped their toe into thier creative potential. Good thing glazes chemistry and mixing are absolute mechanical functions (at first). A+B=C. But the sooner you embrace your fear. The sooner success find you. Failure is an option but one to be feared, it should be embraced. There is a great statement, "Fail forward, fast". Make mistakes make them fast and early progress. Here is a good thing about failures.......you don't have to tell anyone! And if a tree falls where no one hears it............. It's important as artists to push the envelope. I'm not saying jump off the bridge (unless your BASE jumping. Or bungee). Imagine if Kandinsky, Picasso, Dali, Calder, Christo,Warhol etc etc operated from a sense of fear...............it would be a beige world. Your assignment this week is to go outside of,your comfort zone once a day. (Your couch time is up .... Lol)
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#11 oldlady

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 10:19 AM

pugfriend, if i can use this @##%%^ notebook and its tiny keyboard, you can add some distilled water to the packages of dry glaze ingredients i sent you.  (so far i had to backspace over 16 mistakes in the previous line.)  it will only make a tiny amount, maybe a half cup or less, just enough to test over your favorite underglazes. (up to 23 mistakes.)


"putting you down does not raise me up."




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