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    • Jennifer Harnetty

      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.
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rkincaid

Plein Aire

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If it rains you cant work outside with clay, it is against all odds. You can build anything you want in 6 hours, but depending on the thickness it will crack if you let it dry too fast, that is if you are using regular clay, If you are going to use air dry clay that might be a little bit different and might withstand the fast dry but this kind of clay cant be formed into too large pieces. For this kind of situation you might want to re-think the medium, maybe working with rocks, or branches, or any other material that wont become mud if it gets too wet or just fall apart because it is really brittle to be outside. If you give more information as for what is exactly what are you doing I'm sure you might get better responses.

Best.

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The rules state that nothing can be prepared beforehand. We are supposed to work onsite within the grounds of an historical home. I can take everything I need in my car and hopefully find a shady place for my table. I am in a mixed media category and can do anything I want.

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For many years, I worked a booth at a summer festival where children were introduced to all different kinds of art. This was a one day festival that ran from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. If this is what you are facing, the first thing I'd suggest is a clay (kind of expensive) that the kids can take home and fire in their oven. Not talking about Sculpey, this is a clay from your distributor. I would give approx. three-quarters to one pound (large handful)of clay to each child and let them have fun. Show them coils, simple sculpture from pinch pots, drape and paddle clay over the rocks or bisque bowls. One year 231 kids created at the booth (all this with me and one helper--exhausting, but rewarding). The kids ranged in age from three to fifteen.

 

List of tools and accessories: Table; chairs for participants; canvas for tables; dowels for cylinders; paddles; river rocks for draping clay; popsicle sticks (I modified ends of some with hairpins for loop tools); cardboard squares to carry work home; LARGE (5 gal) bucket so kids can wash hands; paper towels; duct tape to hold canvas to table.  Major item, plastic to wrap your work in case of rain or hot weather.

 

The above presumes you are working with a group. If, on the other hand, it will be just you throwing on the wheel, have fun and bring appropriate boxes, etc. to bring your work back to the studio (or do what I used to do. smash the pots and recycle when you get home. If handbuilding, have a workable surface, good tools, a comfy chair, and be prepared to answer questions about the kind of clay, how your fire, what you fire in, and where do you live. You'll hear all kinds of questions, smile, be pleasant and have fun.

 

You didn't give much info about what you were going to be doing, so I've just tossed some info into the Plein Air, and hope it helps. I won't be coming back to the forums until after Labor Day, so won't be able to be more specific to your needs. Good luck!

 

Shirley

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The rules state that nothing can be prepared beforehand. We are supposed to work onsite within the grounds of an historical home. I can take everything I need in my car and hopefully find a shady place for my table. I am in a mixed media category and can do anything I want.

That sounds like so much fun!!! How much clay are they giving you?

If you take a quick stroll around the grounds you should be able to find all kinds of objects and inspiration. I love going with the flow this way and just working from the beginnings of something I find in nature. Whether its roots or rocks or branches or leaves ... let it take you and have a blast.

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In my opinion, if your work is to be permanent i will stay away form clay......clay is going to become mud on the floor at the first rain.  If it is temporary then i will go for it...

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Chris,

I've decided to do just what you said. I'll just go and see what inspires me. I do have a project in mind.

I can take as much clay as I want and I thought maybe I'd take some under glaze.

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