Jump to content


Photo

Can I Really Stack Underglaze Painted Item In Bisque Firing?


  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#21 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,500 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 27 August 2013 - 06:07 PM

Shirley,

 

The green and blue backgrounds are porcelain slip with mason stain.  Two cups of dried porcelain plus 1/3 cup mason stain, mix with water to desired consistency.  Applied with a hake brush on the wheel.  Two coats to make sure there was even coverage.  For the next go around, I am applying a plain white porcelain slip  to help boost some of the colors in firing.  I bisque fired and then gave the wares to Hsi-Mei for decoration.  When I got them back, I decided to re-bisque to make sure none of the artwork smudged while I was glazing them.  My usual preference is to apply underglazes to greenware and then bisque once.  But, after seeing the detail of the artwork, I did not want to risk messing them up. 



#22 Idaho Potter

Idaho Potter

    Learning all the time

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 400 posts
  • LocationBoise, Idaho

Posted 28 August 2013 - 03:16 PM

Don't blame you, her work is awesome--yours, too, of course.  Thanks for the info, I like the contrast of your darker clay with the white slip for the artwork.  Knockout stuff!

 

Shirley



#23 Pugaboo

Pugaboo

    Lifetime artist 2nd year potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 401 posts
  • LocationHelen, GA

Posted 28 August 2013 - 10:28 PM

Chris - thank you so much for your encouragement it really helps. Sometimes it feels like I am shouting into the wind. I still get so frustrated when I can "see" what I want in my head but I still don't have the technique with my hands to get it. Then I get even more distressed when I walk through the group studios gallery and not see anyone else doing any work that even comes close to resembling mine. I find myself asking if I am REALLY bad at this or just unique. On good days I try to convince myself I am unique on bad days I want to grab my pieces and hide them under the counter so no one can see them. It's not just that my color palette is different my shapes are really different as well and then add on the use of underglazes and hand painted images and I look like that Sesame Street game of which one of these is not like the others which one of these does not belong.

Oh well I guess I'll get some feedback from customers when I do a one day local pottery festival the last Saturday in September. I have found in the past with other art mediums that you can learn a lot about your art by listening to the people in your tent. Not always good stuff but a different perspective at any rate. I don't expect to sell anything this first time out but I hope to learn lots about the local market for pottery that I can put into effect for future sales events.

I went by your gallery again today and LOVE the colored clay items you have there. Trying colored clay is on my list of things to do in the future. I can even picture a Fawn Pug curled up on in the shape of a tray with a lavender ribbon rippling across. Getting the different shades of Pug right and splicing (? Not sure what the assembling of the colors is called) them together to show the texture of fur and shadows for its figure will be a challenge. the lavender ribbon will just be fun and whimsical to try. One day I'll know enough about clay to give it a try until then I can look at your gallery and dream.

Thank you for sharing your work and knowledge.

T
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#24 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,500 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 29 August 2013 - 08:19 AM

"Oh well I guess I'll get some feedback from customers when I do a one day local pottery festival the last Saturday in September. I have found in the past with other art mediums that you can learn a lot about your art by listening to the people in your tent."

 

You never know who you will meet and the value of their comments . . . right, Oldlady!  Just take the comments in, don't take anything personally (and avoid the impulse to pack things up and go home). 



#25 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,212 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 29 August 2013 - 10:18 AM

Pugaboo ... I hate to discourage you, but after all these years I still don't get many things to come out the way my mind sees them. I don't know if its a disconnect or short attention span! Also, I've never been able to make things that looked like other people's work. I am quite familiar with the frozen smile. : - )

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#26 Pugaboo

Pugaboo

    Lifetime artist 2nd year potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 401 posts
  • LocationHelen, GA

Posted 29 August 2013 - 05:27 PM

Bciskpottery - I did art festivals for 10 years or so and have learned not to take anything said to heart. I have done shows where I sold nothing the entire time I was there but never gave up and packed it in early. Have also done shows where I didn't sell anything for 2 days then on the 3rd had tons of sales including a $1500 one. By doing shows and listening to people chatting or asking me questions it helped me to be able to talk about my work and my artistic vision. It also helped me realize that sometimes the general public hasn't a clue to what's involved in making something so some gentle educating is called for.

Since pottery is a new medium for me it will be interesting to see how the new work is met by the general public. I am also exhibiting in a brand new part of the country and in a small town at that which is also new since I only did large cities in the past. It will also be interesting to see what things attract people and what type items are ho hum boring seen it a million times and couldn't care less. Getting older having a disabled husband and 5 dogs I want to only do local festivals from now on. Festivals where I can sleep in my own bed at night so getting an idea what type items are popular in the area is kind of important. And that's a little bit more on where I am coming from and hopefully where I am heading!

T
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#27 Pugaboo

Pugaboo

    Lifetime artist 2nd year potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 401 posts
  • LocationHelen, GA

Posted 29 August 2013 - 05:30 PM

Chris - never discouraging! It's kind of a relief to know that someone who does such wonderful work still sometimes ends up somewhere else other than you planned. It means there may be hope for me yet.

T
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#28 Chilly

Chilly

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 232 posts
  • LocationLangdon Hills, Essex, UK

Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:22 AM

I fired my kiln two days ago, and had just the right amount of shelf space so everything got it's own space.  I remember reading on here a few weeks back about tumble stacking, but couldn't be asked to walk indoors, up-the-stairs to search for it, and anyway, I was certain there was no reference to underglazes in the photos shown and comments.

 

There were 80 key rings, as shown in the picture, and they were all stamped on one side with either Duncan Velvet underglaze in Dark Green or Royal Blue and Duncan Concepts Briarwood or Delft Blue, or a mix of any combination as the felt ran dry.  The other side was stencilled with the same colours but mainly Duncan Velvets.

 

As I was loading I wondered what would happen........... So I took two of the least-good ones and stacked them.  On emptying the kiln I discovered that almost all had left a shadow on the bat wash but were not stuck or ruined, and the two that were stacked had transferred their pattern to each other as a shadow. 

 

What I'm now wondering, is will the shadow notice after they've been dipped in clear glaze and fired to ^6?  Time to find out will be next Friday when they come back out of the kiln.

Attached Files


----------------------------------------------------------

Ann

http://www.readypeda...uk/pottery.html


#29 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,632 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 28 February 2014 - 08:04 AM

The dark colors (black, dark blue, dark red) always leave "ghost" marks behind on the kiln wash. It's interesting to see the signatures, from the bottoms of underglazed wares, still on the shelf, when you remove them. In fact, that would be an interesting print/ transfer method. Make a negative image, add fire it face down on a contrasting colored surface, and there you have a ceramicc ghost print.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#30 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,979 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 28 February 2014 - 08:13 AM

Reds (as well as pinks, purples, and yellows) tend to be finicky.  Some work better than others, e.g., dark red vs. light red.  But there is a tendency to see fading at ^6 and above.
 
For your studio mates who believe underglazes are not for “real” potters, here are a few images from my recent collaboration with Hsi-Mei Yates for her upcoming exhibit at Liberty Town Art in Fredericksburg, VA.  I made the pottery; she did the artwork.  Hsi-Mei is my Chinese brush painting instructor; I started classes with her as I was frustrated with my brushwork on pottery and wanted to learn brush loading, strokes, etc.  I was most fortunate in that Hsi-Mei, after finishing her schooling, began work decorating vases and pottery for a ceramics company in Taiwan.  She was one of the artists allowed to do free-style decorating, while others were given templates to copy.  These are the first pottery she has decorated in about 30 years.  Yep, real “paint your pottery” stuff. 
 
Clay body is Highwater’s Little Loafers; underglazes are Amaco Velvets.  Bisque fired to ^05; glazed with clear (non-commercial) and fired to ^6.

Bciske,
Really nice brush work.
Marcia




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users