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What Mesh Sieve Do You Screen To For Dipping Glazes?


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#1 clay lover

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 08:33 AM

  I have been using up to a 60 mesh, and screening with a little sieve to 80 for spraying.  Would I benefit from buying a large screen and sieving my buckets to a fine mesh than 60?  How far do you go?

I have several different glazes with different ingredients, if that makes a difference..

I'm not getting grit on my pots, just wondering what, if anything, would change with more screening.



#2 TJR

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 08:53 AM

I make all of my own glazes in 5 gallon buckets. That would be approx. 10,000 grams of glaze.

I sieve with an 80 mesh screen into a clean 5 ggallon pail.

I then sieve the glaze back into the original 5 gallon pail [which I have washed], using a 100 mesh sieve.

The finer you sieve, the better the melt, especially for lower temperature glazes such as at cone04.

Ash glazes I only sieve to 40 mesh, as I like the texture.

TJR.



#3 clay lover

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 09:31 AM

Thanks for your info.  I am curious as to why the finer mesh makes better melt.

 

I saw some ^6 pots at a high quality show last week.  The League of NH Craft's annual show in Sunapee.  Lots of high quality ^6 work which I don't usually see in my area, so really inspiring.  The glazes were the same formulas I am using, I recognized them and asked the potters. From MCSG mostly, but the look was so much better than mine, depth and surface.  And mine are pretty nice.    Now I am fixated on how to improve my glazes.  



#4 neilestrick

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 09:36 AM

I have always sieved to 80 mesh. No problems. The finer the particles, the easier they melt. However the screen isn't reducing the particles size of the materials, it's breaking up clumps. Enough mixing and you don't need to screen at all.


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#5 OffCenter

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 10:41 AM

I spray most of my glazes so have to run them through a 100 mesh screen. For a couple of them I have to do what TJR does and run them through an 80 mesh screen first.

 

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#6 Mark C.

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 11:37 AM

I run everything thru an 80 mesh-I fire cone 10 and make it all from scratch-I dip pour -spray-all thru the 80 mesh.

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#7 Chris Campbell

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 11:44 AM

If my mesh is too fine I get stuff that does not pass through it but obviously needs to be in the glaze. How do you get those into the glaze? Am I not mixing it enough first?

Also, I think glazes improve if the raw ingredients are fine milled before ... I don't think the screen mills them any finer just breaks up clumps??

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#8 neilestrick

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 02:06 PM

If my mesh is too fine I get stuff that does not pass through it but obviously needs to be in the glaze. How do you get those into the glaze? Am I not mixing it enough first?

Also, I think glazes improve if the raw ingredients are fine milled before ... I don't think the screen mills them any finer just breaks up clumps??

 

Run the power mixer longer to break up as many clumps as possible before sieving.

 

Most glaze materials are 200 mesh or finer, however that's not always 100% accurate, and some materials clump up in to quite hard chunks that can be difficult to break up with the screen. You should technically be able to run a glaze through a 180 mesh screen, although it will take a long time to work it through a screen that is that close to the particle size of the materials. I think anything over 100 mesh is overkill for most applications, or if it won't go through your sprayer. The only time I've seen anything finer required was using a particular stain that would clump enough to cause speckles in the glaze rather than being perfectly dispersed in the glaze. In that case, the stain was sieved through a 180 with a small portion of the glaze batch. There was no reason to sieve the entire batch that finely, since only the stain was the problem.

 

A ball mil will actually reduce the particle size, although for most glazes it's overkill. Not worth the effort most of the time. Many glaze manufacturers us high shear mixers for their glazes, which negates the need for sieving and can also reduce the particle size.

 

If you're not having any problems with the 80 mesh, no need to do anything finer. The small the mesh size, the longer it will take to sieve the glaze.


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#9 Wyndham

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 02:13 PM

I use 80 mesh but the lithium I have gets caught in that screen so mortar & pestle if I have too much big stuff.

 

If I mix a 10k glaze batch and only have a few grams in the screen, I toss it as that's not enough to matter in that much glaze.

 

I've gotten some titanium dioxide that just mucks up in the new glaze and have to push it through the screen. After that screening the Titanium disperses well into the glaze and no prob after that.

 

Wyndham



#10 Pres

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 06:34 PM

I use some small amounts of granular material in some glazes. These I add after the two sieves with 80 mesh. Then I remix the glaze to disperse.

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#11 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 09:50 PM

Usually 60-80 mesh.




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