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Slip Transfer Help For Leather Hard Work

transfers slip decoration

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#1 mel340

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 11:18 AM

Hi all,

 

Intermediate level-I'm trying to make some slip transfers with slips/underglazes with some of my drawings on leather hard pieces. I tend to use stoneware and/or terra cotta clays and bisque to cone 06.

 

I tried rice paper, but it's too fibrous, it seeps into the work and the decoration loses clarity (see rice paper transfer photo examples). I recently bought transfer paper to try, it's a bit dry (I tried to use underglaze on this) and not all of the decoration transfers across to the piece. I used two coats of underglaze on the last try with transfer paper. I'm hand painting the decorations onto the paper using some of my drawings.

 

I put the paper on the leather hard piece, gently wet the back of the paper until it has "traction" on the piece, then rub the decoration with the back of a spoon. I gently peel back the paper on a corner to see how much of the decoration has been transferred. This almost worked (especially with the transfer paper), it missed in a few areas, so I just touched up with the same underglaze. It'd be nice to be able to transfer the decoration with this type of application instead of having to touch up areas.

 

 

Any suggestions for a better application? 

 

Thanks in advance!

mel340

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#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 04:22 PM

I've used plain old newsprint to make slip decorations on and then transfer it to leatherhard wares. Check out Mitch Lyons -- he's been doing the newsprint transfer for some time and has info on his website.

#3 Pugaboo

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 05:42 PM

I haven't done slip transfers yet but have done quite a few underglaze transfers. Not sure if this is the look you are going for so am sticking a few pictures here of what the pieces I do look like. If this IS what you are looking to do I'll go into detail for you on how it's done.

Terry

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#4 Biglou13

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 08:27 PM

+ 1 for newsprint. Search videos here there s a tutorial. Once you figure out clay dryness, and how damp transfer. You should be able to get better than 90% success rate.

I used a Brayer on flat slabs, Transferring on built pieces my be problematic.

This one has multiple transfers

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#5 mel340

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 10:48 AM

All helpful information! I have a lot of newsprint, I'll switch to it. 

 

@Pugaboo, the transfer paper transfers on my work look similar to your second photo posted. So it seems transfer paper kinda does what I need it too (maybe a few more experiments needed still), I was hoping to not have to reverse some of the bits, ha ha!

 

@Biglou13-yes, I'll experiment with the dryness/damp transfer times! 

 

Thanks all!

Mel



#6 Pompots

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 11:31 AM

Just wondering, if you have the skill to paint on a surface to transfer, why not to paint directly on the piece? 



#7 perkolator

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 02:48 PM

to toss a wrench into the mix, you can do transfers with a slab of plaster as well.  think of it as monotype printing on clay.  all you need to do is make a plaster slab in whatever size you want, then paint/draw your image on the surface with glaze/underglaze, then transfer it to clay. 

 

for what the OP is doing, i've always used newspaper or even regular printer paper.



#8 Pugaboo

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 04:46 PM

I make my own underglaze transfers using my laser printer and Amaco LUGs. Way cheaper than commercial bought transfer paper. I am doing transfers because I have a couple decades of my own artwork I would like to get on pottery without having to redo them from scratch. Doing the transfers like I am doing is super easy I photoshop, print, paint with UG, dry, dip in water and lay on finished piece then fire... Very easy and way quicker than painting each piece by hand from scratch. It's important for this process to have bone dry ware or its a real pain to get to work.

I am also doing Mason transfers which gives a ton more detail than underglaze transfers. I am attaching a couple pictures of boxes I made using this technique. The first one with the little dog is a Mason transfer using a painting I did a couple years ago. The second image of all the little test boxes the second one from the left with the castle is a test of this process as well. Today I just put this image on a large 16 inch tall vase and its way faster than hand painting all those details. This one needs to be done on wet clay which can be a pain like with the vase I did today to try and get the image transferred without damaging the wet form.

My next test with transfers will be laser transfers this is a completely different method that is done after the piece is glazed and fired you then apply the transfer and refire at bisque temps. I am excited to see how this method turns out.

I want to try a couple other methods that utilize silk screen type processes I just haven't had time to get the supplies wanting to focus on getting a handle on the methods I am currently trying out instead.

Terry

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#9 mel340

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 07:17 PM

@Pompots-I've been trying to do a more production based workflow, painting the underglaze or slip on the transfer paper keeps the image the same size each time as I'm utilizing a template for the mug construction, so I'm trying to keep all these uniform where possible.

 

@Pugaboo-I haven't gotten to the point yet to try to save up and buy one of those expensive printers, I'll look into it soon or see if I can share the cost with someone!

 

@Perkolator-I'll try the drawing on plaster/transfer to clay shortly. I've always wanted to try that method. I have the Paul Andrew Wandless book now...I'll try some of his methods soon! I find that regular printer paper is too stiff when I'm trying to get an image on a curve, etc. so the cheap transfer paper seemed like a good alternative.



#10 Pugaboo

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 10:34 PM

Mel340 - You can get really cheap pads of newsprint from the art or craft store and it flexes a bit more than printer paper so is easier to wrap around a rounded form. You might try that and see if it helps you get a nice release.
I paid a little over a $100 for my printer which is pretty good I think. The toner cartridge lasts a long time too so even for printing other stuff it's cheaper to use than an inkjet.
I have Paul Wandless book as well plus a couple more all of which are super helpful in figuring this stuff out.

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#11 Pompots

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Posted 16 August 2013 - 01:30 AM

makes sense, thanks.... hope you can get it done..... best.



#12 Chris Campbell

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Posted 16 August 2013 - 09:28 AM

I learned a technique from Ro Mead where you apply the slip to fabric, wait for it to set up just right ... then gently press it onto the surface. The success depends on waiting for the right moment ... Too soon you just get squished messes ... Too late it cracks. We used old cotton bed sheets which tend to wick off excess moisture at an even rate. We drew our patterns on the reverse ... they showed up through the fabric so we could easily apply slip. Just wash and reuse.

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#13 John255

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Posted 16 August 2013 - 12:28 PM

I learned a technique from Ro Mead where you apply the slip to fabric, wait for it to set up just right ... then gently press it onto the surface. The success depends on waiting for the right moment ... Too soon you just get squished messes ... Too late it cracks. We used old cotton bed sheets which tend to wick off excess moisture at an even rate. We drew our patterns on the reverse ... they showed up through the fabric so we could easily apply slip. Just wash and reuse.

Chris,

I wonder if a similar technique could have been used with glaze on bisque in the Calico Glazed Mystery I posted a few days back?

Good that you kept a stock of clean bed sheets for new work, or for attending KKK meetings.

John255


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#14 mel340

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 09:46 AM

@Chris Campbell--Awesome! The bed sheets method really appeals to my "green side". I always save old clothes and stuff to make "scrap" monsters for  expecting mommies, so I do have a lot of material that's probably usable...I'll experiment with this too, I don't think it occurred to me to use material. It'll fit a curve better than paper too I'd bet!



#15 Chris Campbell

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 10:20 AM

It does curves very well ... The tricky part is watching it and applying it at just the right time. Of course you can always wipe off mistakes and start over. Some people even used the patterns on the sheets as guides for decoration ... These were really old sheets from the paisley era ... Slightly after the harvest gold/avocado green years.

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#16 kathi

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 11:21 AM

Mel340 - You can get really cheap pads of newsprint from the art or craft store and it flexes a bit more than printer paper so is easier to wrap around a rounded form. You might try that and see if it helps you get a nice release.
I paid a little over a $100 for my printer which is pretty good I think. The toner cartridge lasts a long time too so even for printing other stuff it's cheaper to use than an inkjet.
I have Paul Wandless book as well plus a couple more all of which are super helpful in figuring this stuff out.

Terry

Even cheaper than pads of newsprint.....I go to the newspaper office and purchase the "end rolls."  These are the rolls of newsprint that only have one inch of paper left on them; not enough to leave on the press, but plenty to use....They charge me $1 apiece.



#17 trina

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 12:56 PM

I use plain wall paper. I soak it enough to get it nice and damp, then I paint on my picture with coloured slips then I flip it on to the leather hard clay. Then I wait until the paper drys off some. Peel off the paper and there you have it. In my gallery there is a tile picture of a purple coloured budha. I did that with this method. You might not get the lines as clean as you might want but it works for me. T

#18 mel340

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 05:49 PM

Monster Men mugs
 
 
Here's the finished terra cotta mugs using the rice paper transfer...I had to touch up most of these. I'll post the transfer paper mugs after glazing/firing.


#19 Chris Throws Pots

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 02:45 PM

Hi Mel,

Over the last year much of my work has included screen printed slip transfers on thrown forms. I, like a few who have already responded, have found newsprint to be a great vehicle for the transfer process. I get end rolls from the local newspaper. If I'm going to do transfers the same day as I print them I will use basic newsprint. If I plan a printing day with a transfer day to follow I'll use the advertisement paper... like what the supermarket circulars are printed on. This paper is a bit more absorbent and prevents the image from flaking off the paper once it fully dries and sits for a while.

I apply one thin layer layer of base slip over transfer image and another onto the vessel. The key is getting the timing right. Ideally both slips set up at the same pace. Once the slip loses its shine I'll carefully apply the transfer to the vessel. I've been doing a lot of all-over prints, so typically I'll just roll the vessel on the transfer. It picks up the paper and sets the transfer in place. I pat it down with my hands, pop any air pockets with annexacto blade, then use a red extra-soft Sherrill Mud Tools rib as a squeegee to fully set the image. Once the paper is almost all the way dried out I will peel it off the form.

I went through a pretty long trial and error process to dial in the details: consistency of the slip, how to brush it on without distorting the image to be transferred, timing the two layers of slip, etc. Play, practice and patience.

Hope this helps some.

C

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#20 mel340

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 03:16 PM

Chris,

 

Thanks for the info...The added bit about a layer of slip on the piece and on the image before transferring makes a lot of sense. I'll give it a try. BTW-I LOVE your pieces in the attached photos! 

 

Sincerely,

Mel







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