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Bisque Wrapped In Newspaper For A Very, Very Long Time

newspaper ink residue

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#21 Pugaboo

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 03:16 PM

Wasn't there a subject awhile back where someone was having an issue with dark spots appearing on there ware? I tried doing a search to find it but the search engine here hates me :(

I think someone under that subject mentioned it might be something called mildew and that it came from under fired bisque or something. Or maybe it was moisture in the piece that caused the mildew that only appeared once fired. Like I said I tried to find the subject again but couldn't. Maybe someone here that has gotten the search engine to like them can do a search and find it?

Sorry that probably no help at all.

Terry
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#22 ceramix

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 04:57 PM

That is interesting about the lead. It was 1992. LOL.... I wonder?  I'm going to try scrubbing them before I re-bisque any more. I don't think mildew cause it wasn't there before I re-fired, yesterday. I'm gonna glaze test on a small pot in a test kiln and cross my fingers. I'll have to but a little kiln god on it and do a little dance. The dance is optional.....



#23 Idaho Potter

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 06:56 PM

I had some pots that students left and so I used them for glaze testing.  Some of them had spots like that after bisque firing.  That caused problems as the glaze did not fire well.  I finally decided the clay had grown a crop of organics while sitting wrapped in newspaper.  A higher bisque cone took care of my problem.  Your problem will let you know if you guess wrong.

 

Shirley



#24 ceramix

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 07:06 PM

Hi Shirley, Do you remember how high you had to bisque? I think these were originally fired to 07.

 

Lee



#25 Pres

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 07:27 PM

I had a mother of a student who had gone to bfa at Carnegie Melon give me a bunch of his bisqued pieces after he died in his late 30's. They sat in my room for a few years while I tried to best figure how to get rid of 20 pieces in the best way. In the end one of my adult classes heard the story, we cleaned them up, after unpacking from newspaper 10 yrs old, and then glazed and fired. We had a little memorial party and everyone had a piece to take home.

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#26 Mudslinger Ceramics

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 08:27 AM

Hi

 

I've very recently unpacked a wet bin load of old bisque in old newspapers that has sat in a celler for 9 years. The pots had the most outstanding green, black or white moulds growing on them!!!

 

All went into 2 big bisque firings at Cone 06 and all but one look great again, several are in a glaze fire now.   The odd one looks a bit discoloured but that is probably with a smear of slip.   I was experimenting with slip for a while and figure I packed this one without a good clean first....but... I have an opaque satin black I want to test so this little pot will be it!

 

My vote is bisque again to Cone 06.

 

Irene


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#27 Idaho Potter

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 03:18 PM

I usually bisque to cone 04, so that's probably what I did with those old pots.

 

Shirley



#28 joshur

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 10:02 PM

It is just mold, if it were mine and I wanted to be sure I got the best possible results, I would re bisque and then blow off the residue. I have done that before with pieces that have sat for 30 years, it is amazing the amount of organic and other buildup that happens over time. Last year I fired a large electric kiln that had sat for 15 to 20 years, it smoked quite a bit from all the organic material that had grown in the kiln.






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