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Bisque Wrapped In Newspaper For A Very, Very Long Time

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Yipeee......Finally about to glaze some pots that have sadly sat wrapped in newspaper for a very, very long time. I expect a resist or residue from the ink....yes? Shall I re-fire at a low temp to burn these oils off? How hot do you think?

thanks

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Are you planning on dipping them? If so I'd dip see what it looks like and if the coverage looks good I would fire them. You can always wash off the dipped glaze if you think they aren't coated enough and then refire, I would imagine you only need to go into the 400's C to burn off any oil. T

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Well, their location has changed over the course of YEARS.  LOL  They had been wrapped initially for 20 years....I kid you not....in the basement. They have been sitting out in the studio/garage for a year while I've considered what to do with them. I laugh at the moisture question, I live on Long Island and it's pouring out. I re-fired a load yesterday and some of them developed small 1/4" gray dots, like shadows, flat no texture. I only took it to barely red heat and shut it off. 

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My wifes sister gave her some pots she made in school-over 30 years ago-we glazed them and fired them without any of this fretting they where wrapped in old newspapers-no issues-they where high fire clay(cone 10)

Mark

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I think the only issue here would be dust, which could cause your glaze to crawl. I would dip then in a 5 gallon bucket of water, then right out again. Let them dry over-night, then glaze.If you are in a humid part of the country, you could use a fan to dry them, but this sounds like a bit much as far as work.

TJR.

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I say glaze and fire them and don't worry. If the newspaper or the elapsed time have any effect on the finished pots, well that's just part of the story of those pots.

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what is red heat...

 

1000F+

 

never heard that expression... :) T

 

TRINA;

This a techical term for colour in the kiln. Back in the day, lots of potters did not use cones to fire their bisque,and shut her down when they attained a good red heat. I have done this myself. Takes experience, but it works.Potters didn't used to use cones. In a glaze firing, they would have draw rings that had various glazes on them. These would be pulled out periodically, dunked in water andchecked for glaze development and reduction.

TJR.

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Only some of the pots got these crazy dots. I attached a close up of the dots after the re-fire. They were not there prior. Difficult surface to shoot.

Guess I've had them in limbo for so long I'm over thinking them.

thanks everyone,

I will just scrub them and see what happens. I've attached a 

post-58932-0-92443000-1376422017_thumb.jpg

post-58932-0-16954400-1376422085_thumb.jpg

post-58932-0-92443000-1376422017_thumb.jpg

post-58932-0-16954400-1376422085_thumb.jpg

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(Potters didn't used to use cones)

Hey they still skip it these days as well

I have not used a bisque cone in my gas car kiln in over 30 years-eyeball and pyro good enough.

You just learn the color by eye-you can see this best where the wares touch the shelve I feel.

Mark

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Wasn't there a subject awhile back where someone was having an issue with dark spots appearing on there ware? I tried doing a search to find it but the search engine here hates me :(

 

I think someone under that subject mentioned it might be something called mildew and that it came from under fired bisque or something. Or maybe it was moisture in the piece that caused the mildew that only appeared once fired. Like I said I tried to find the subject again but couldn't. Maybe someone here that has gotten the search engine to like them can do a search and find it?

 

Sorry that probably no help at all.

 

Terry

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That is interesting about the lead. It was 1992. LOL.... I wonder?  I'm going to try scrubbing them before I re-bisque any more. I don't think mildew cause it wasn't there before I re-fired, yesterday. I'm gonna glaze test on a small pot in a test kiln and cross my fingers. I'll have to but a little kiln god on it and do a little dance. The dance is optional.....

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I had some pots that students left and so I used them for glaze testing.  Some of them had spots like that after bisque firing.  That caused problems as the glaze did not fire well.  I finally decided the clay had grown a crop of organics while sitting wrapped in newspaper.  A higher bisque cone took care of my problem.  Your problem will let you know if you guess wrong.

 

Shirley

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I had a mother of a student who had gone to bfa at Carnegie Melon give me a bunch of his bisqued pieces after he died in his late 30's. They sat in my room for a few years while I tried to best figure how to get rid of 20 pieces in the best way. In the end one of my adult classes heard the story, we cleaned them up, after unpacking from newspaper 10 yrs old, and then glazed and fired. We had a little memorial party and everyone had a piece to take home.

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