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Seeking Foodsafe Glaze Recipes For Wood Firing

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Hi All,

 

In about a month I'll be participating in a woodfiring, and I'm hoping to find a few recipes for cone 9-10 glazes. The kiln fires FAST! Cone 10 in 12 hours. Its design was based off of the Phoenix Fast-Fire built in New Hampshire in the 70s. The speed of the firing is great, as we'll be firing as public demonstration in downtown Burlington, Vermont, but it doesn't allow a lot of time for ash build up. Some, but not enough to just rely on the ash for aesthetic. With this in mind, I'm planning to glaze my work. We'll also introduce some salt through the fire box at the end of the firing. I've only fired on wood a few times, so I haven't had the opportunity to mix, test, tweak my own glazes. I work primarily in functional forms, so food safety is super important. Any help will be greatly appreciated!

 

I'm looking for:

- a tenmoku to be used as a liner

- a clear to be used over silkscreened slip transfers

- a celadon

- a shino

- anything anyone feels like sharing

 

Thanks!

 

Chris

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Wyndham    98

Do a google recipe search for celadons or shino's or just cone 10 firing glaze recipes and you'll get plenty. BTW a temoku & celadon can be  the same base but celadon is about 1-2 % iron oxide and temoku is 9-10% iron oxide and clear is no iron. You will get some color influence from the ash and reduction  as well as the clay body, but that should look good.

Hope this helps

Wyndham

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OffCenter    82

Here's a simple cone 9-12 glaze that is a nice yellow or yellow-green depending on the firing. It's a fake ash glaze that works great with real ash. I use it for a liner glaze in pots that are glazed by wood ash on the outside in an anagama firing that is stoked for 5 days. Gorgeous where the natural ash and fake ash interact. If the kiln cools slowly, this glaze will develop nice crystals, too. Depending on the firing, this glaze goes from blah to incredible.

 

Alberta Slip ... 44

Kaolin ... 25

Whiting ... 31

 

Jim

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TJR    359

Here's a simple cone 9-12 glaze that is a nice yellow or yellow-green depending on the firing. It's a fake ash glaze that works great with real ash. I use it for a liner glaze in pots that are glazed by wood ash on the outside in an anagama firing that is stoked for 5 days. Gorgeous where the natural ash and fake ash interact. If the kiln cools slowly, this glaze will develop nice crystals, too. Depending on the firing, this glaze goes from blah to incredible.

 

Alberta Slip ... 44

Kaolin ... 25

Whiting ... 31

 

Jim

Jim;

If you substitute the kaolin for ball clay, you could apply this to leatherhard pots, especially on the insides of bowls.

Test,test,test.

TJR.

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OffCenter    82

 

Here's a simple cone 9-12 glaze that is a nice yellow or yellow-green depending on the firing. It's a fake ash glaze that works great with real ash. I use it for a liner glaze in pots that are glazed by wood ash on the outside in an anagama firing that is stoked for 5 days. Gorgeous where the natural ash and fake ash interact. If the kiln cools slowly, this glaze will develop nice crystals, too. Depending on the firing, this glaze goes from blah to incredible.

 

Alberta Slip ... 44

Kaolin ... 25

Whiting ... 31

 

Jim

Jim;

If you substitute the kaolin for ball clay, you could apply this to leatherhard pots, especially on the insides of bowls.

Test,test,test.

TJR.

 

 

You mean sub ball clay for kaolin I think. Actually, you don't even need to change the clay to apply to greenware, but I may try that to see what happens. Thanks for the suggestion. I'm also subbing New Zealand Kaolin (purest in the world) for the GA Kaolin and EPK that I usually use.

 

Jim

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TJR    359

 

 

Here's a simple cone 9-12 glaze that is a nice yellow or yellow-green depending on the firing. It's a fake ash glaze that works great with real ash. I use it for a liner glaze in pots that are glazed by wood ash on the outside in an anagama firing that is stoked for 5 days. Gorgeous where the natural ash and fake ash interact. If the kiln cools slowly, this glaze will develop nice crystals, too. Depending on the firing, this glaze goes from blah to incredible.

 

Alberta Slip ... 44

Kaolin ... 25

Whiting ... 31

 

Jim

Jim;

If you substitute the kaolin for ball clay, you could apply this to leatherhard pots, especially on the insides of bowls.

Test,test,test.

TJR.

 

 

You mean sub ball clay for kaolin I think. Actually, you don't even need to change the clay to apply to greenware, but I may try that to see what happens. Thanks for the suggestion. I'm also subbing New Zealand Kaolin (purest in the world) for the GA Kaolin and EPK that I usually use.

 

Jim

 

Jim;

I wasn't sure if that sounded right. I meant take out the kaolin and replace it with a more plastic clay[ball clay] so that you can glaze your pieces at leather hard. I don't know if you need the purest kaolin if you are slapping it together with Alberta slip clay. Just saying.

T.

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OffCenter    82

 

 

 

Here's a simple cone 9-12 glaze that is a nice yellow or yellow-green depending on the firing. It's a fake ash glaze that works great with real ash. I use it for a liner glaze in pots that are glazed by wood ash on the outside in an anagama firing that is stoked for 5 days. Gorgeous where the natural ash and fake ash interact. If the kiln cools slowly, this glaze will develop nice crystals, too. Depending on the firing, this glaze goes from blah to incredible.

 

Alberta Slip ... 44

Kaolin ... 25

Whiting ... 31

 

Jim

Jim;

If you substitute the kaolin for ball clay, you could apply this to leatherhard pots, especially on the insides of bowls.

Test,test,test.

TJR.

 

 

You mean sub ball clay for kaolin I think. Actually, you don't even need to change the clay to apply to greenware, but I may try that to see what happens. Thanks for the suggestion. I'm also subbing New Zealand Kaolin (purest in the world) for the GA Kaolin and EPK that I usually use.

 

Jim

 

Jim;

I wasn't sure if that sounded right. I meant take out the kaolin and replace it with a more plastic clay[ball clay] so that you can glaze your pieces at leather hard. I don't know if you need the purest kaolin if you are slapping it together with Alberta slip clay. Just saying.

T.

 

 

It works fine on greenware without replacing the kaolin with ball clay. Most glazes do. I never take any notice of the ball clay in a glaze or even the amount of clay in the glaze to use it on unbisqued pots.

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