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Applying 2 Glazes Side By Side With No Bleed

Is it possible?

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#1 Pugaboo

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 06:13 PM

I have an idea for a set of stacking boxes that I would like to make but am struggling with some of the details.

If I were to use a blue glaze in a wavy curly design tumbling down the boxes (think waterfall) with a brown or green glaze along each side (think rocks and woods) how would I keep the 2 colors from bleeding and possibly creating a not so pretty color where they meet? Is this even possible?

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#2 Mark C.

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 06:41 PM

Yes this is possible-it depends on the glazes and the temp range, as well if its a veritacal or horizontal application. If I recall you are working in low fire-so I'll let others chine in who work in this low temp field.

Mark


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#3 Pugaboo

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 08:03 PM

Sorry I should have given more details. I work in Little Loafers ^6. The surfaces would both be horizontal and vertical. I don't have a scanned copy of my sketch with me so I'll try to describe it a bit better.
Make 3 boxes ( maybe 4 have it sketched both ways) each a bit smaller than the other. Stack them on top of each other sort of like a tall skinny Guatemalan pyramid, think steps not smooth transitions. Now carve into each box a swirly kind of abstract water feature so it looks like its tumbling down all the boxes. Since each box is slightly smaller than the one below it the waterfall will go from vertical to horizontal on each box as it goes from top to bottom. Not sure if that makes sense to anybody but me.
The boxes will each be separate not 1 whole towering multi level box. Each will have a simple flat lid that can be lifted off so that each layer could be a completely free standing entire box if desired.
I want to glaze the carved swirled parts with glossy blue glaze and I want to glaze the remaining portions in either a green or a brown preferably with a mat or satin surface. I want that contrast between the slick water and rough land.
So given my design what type of glazes should I be looking into? I was wondering if I could glaze the brown areas first fire that then apply the blue and fire that. Maybe a ^6 Tenmoku and a low fire blue of some kind? Would that keep the glazes separate or just make for a big mess?

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#4 bciskepottery

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 08:29 PM

You can do this with glazes, but be prepared to do a lot of testing.  You'll likely need to find glossy and matte base glazes that are stiff and do not move when fired (almost something like a majolica glaze) . . . then try adding colorants to get the colors and surface you desire.  A big challenge is where the two glazes will meet and melt together. 

 

You could try cuerda seca (technique where a design is outlined in oxide-tinted wax resist, and the intervening spaces coated with glazes; finished results show areas of glaze divided by dark unglazed lines) to keep the glazes separate and prevent their melting together. I believe Aftosa makes a black stained wax resist that could be used to separate respective areas.

 

Another option is to use underglazes to paint the waterfall scene and then apply a clear glaze over it . . . if you apply your clear with a brush, there are commercial glossy and satin finishes available.  Again, test to see how they like each other when fired side-by-side.  And, test on both horizontal and vertical surfaces. 



#5 Pam S

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 09:17 PM

LOL! what he said! Experiment with the underglazes and clear.


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#6 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 07:05 AM

Hamada used Bray liquid wax and so did Shaner. There are lots more liquid waxes available today.
Apply the first glaze. Wax over it the exact pattern you want. Sponge away the excess and apply second glaze.

Marcia

#7 John255

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 08:11 PM

Pugaboo,

You may be interested in seeing how this thread unfolds.

http://ceramicartsda...ery/#entry40626

John255


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#8 Pugaboo

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 10:24 PM

John255 - yep you're right I'm already watching it and am very interested in how it goes. I know very little but to me it almost looks like there is a thin line of a different color between the fields of color? Is it possible he used a colored wax to draw the lines then filled in with the different glazes? Like I said I have no clue I am very new to this I'm just thrilled when I get 1 glaze to do what I want much less several on the same piece. Glazing and I are not on the best of terms but I have decided to try and get braver and not rely on underglazes and clear glaze quite so much hence my desire to use glazes to make the waterfall boxes.

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#9 John255

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 08:19 AM

Pugaboo,

The suggestions on my thread are leaning hard on waxing over the poured glazes?

I think you would get more ideas if you could share the imagery you have in your head for your piece with a drawing.

Just lay the sketch down and shoot it with you digicam , or phone.

Good luck.

John255


John255

#10 Chris Campbell

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 11:32 AM

I love to let the process do its thing so I think it would be beautiful to do your rocks and trees imagery and let the blue glaze run ... That is what water does and the results would be very exciting ... imagine the thrill of opening the kiln.

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#11 neilestrick

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 06:07 PM

If both colors of glaze are the same base formula, they will be less likely to run where they meet. Find a stiff glaze and test the colors.


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#12 Idaho Potter

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 06:47 PM

I have been experimenting with cone 6 majolica glazes (by Laguna?).  They are very stable and can be placed next to each other without bleeding.  The only time I've had any bleeding of one glaze into the other was a bowl that I painted a flower inside, on the bottom, and then made the rest of the pot black.  It didn't destroy the flower, but there was more "shading" than I anticipated.  Experiment, experiment, experiment. The color separation is better on a horizontal application than on vertical, but if you are trying to represent a waterfall, they don't have nice neat edges.

 

Shirley






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