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Drip Plate?


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#1 capt don

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 02:12 PM

I have a glaze that calls for a drip plate, what do most people use for a drip plate? I was going to Lowes and buy a couple red clay dishes like you would put under a garden pot.

thanks Capt don



#2 trina

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 02:21 PM

How high are you planning to fire? I have got some pretty runny low fire glazes that i put on posts and use my rattiest kiln shelves. However if you are firing into the higher cones, I wouldn't recommend a terracotta undertray, it wont stand up to the heat and could itself melt. T

#3 atanzey

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 03:24 PM

I use my regular clay, and thrown plates.  I'm no good at plates, so there are always some around that are expendable.   I've also coated them with kiln wash on occasion, so the item would come off better, and I could re-use it.

 

Alice



#4 mregecko

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 04:19 PM

Use the same clay that you're using for your pieces.

 

Roll out a slab and just bring up the edges (curl, roll, pinch, whatever) so that any overflow will pool and not run off the dish.

 

Bisque them, then use the drip plate under your ware.

 

I agree with the kiln wash application -- if you do have drips, it will make it much easier to separate.

 

If you plan on doing this a lot, there are some specific formulas for kiln-furniture style clay that can be repeat-fired many times.

 

But if you put a terracotta tray from a hardware store in the kiln and fire it too high, it will definitely melt. 



#5 bciskepottery

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 06:00 PM

In the event you are working with crystalline glazes, here is a link to an article that shows how Bill Schran uses drip plates and pedestals.

 

http://www.creativec...ne6Crystals.pdf

 

Even if you are not using crystalline glazes, the idea of a pedestal might make sense as it appears easier to cleanly break a pedestal off the bottom than it would be if the glaze ran onto a plate that has less working room between the plate surface and pot bottom. 



#6 perkolator

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 05:24 PM

we just use studio body/whatever clay you're using for a firing tray/drip catch plate.  make sure to build it well and fire it to the cone you're glazing at - this way you know it is crack-free.  to help make it more of a re-usable tray, coat with kiln wash and place a nice layer of silica where your drips will fall - silica will hopefully just catch the glaze and either "bead" it up or soak up the mess allowing you to remove it for a clean tray.



#7 Ben

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 07:43 AM

Why use silica?

Wouldn't alumina hydrate be a better material to fill the drip plate with?



#8 neilestrick

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 10:38 AM

Why use silica?

Wouldn't alumina hydrate be a better material to fill the drip plate with?

 

 

Silica is cheap.


Neil Estrick
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#9 perkolator

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 11:22 AM

^this exact reason.



#10 Wyndham

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 05:44 PM

I've had good luck with using soft firebrick cut 1/2 in thick for a pad under mugs, vases or bowls and brushing some kiln wash on the softbrick, placing this on the drip plate.

For me it's easier to clean off the bottom of the mug,etc where some of the soft brick might be stuck with some glaze.

Wyndham






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