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nancylee

What Kind Of Glaze Do They Use In Provence?

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I love these colors, but when I try to duplicate them with under glazes, they come washed out/show brush marks, etc. What a mess!!! Do they use glazes for these? And if so, how do they not run?

 

Thanks for any information,

Nancy

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Most likely these are encapsulated cadmium stains in a slip with a clear glaze. As to the firing temp, it could be from 06 to cone 6. Fiestaware back in the day used uranium for the bright yellow, orange and reds but cadmium encapsulated in a zirconium shell is what is used for these colors today, generally

Wyndham

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You can get this look with underglaze and clear glaze over. Here are some tips.

Use the same company's products so the clear over glaze is the one they recommend for their underglazes. They have chemists on staff to make sure they all work together. I use Amaco products but others here might have different recommendations

Use both products as recommended ... Three layers of color or glaze brushed in opposite directions will eliminate the appearance of most brush strokes.

Fire the underglaze to about Cone 013 before applying the clear glaze to eliminate smearing. Many artists do this low firing between colors to keep lines crisp..

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Hi,

Thanks, Chris. One clarification, please? Do you fire to bisque, then underglaze, fire again then clear glaze, fire a third time?

Thank you, both,

Nancy

Underglaze can be used on greenware, or bisqueware.  Chris mentioned firing them after underglazing, and before applying the clear, to avoid potentially smearing the underglaze.  This is the approach I like to take as well, though it's not required, and some ceramicists don't bother with this step.

Like Chris, I prefer the Amaco underglazes.  They've worked well for me so far. 

Brushstrokes can be an issue with the underglazes, because unlike the glazes, which melt and smooth out, the underglazes can be a bit unforgiving in this regard.

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I did a ceramics residency in Southern France last year. We used commercial glazes purchased in dry batch quantities.

Every Tuesday the group went to the ceramics supply store for materials.There were Duncan underglazes which is an American brand, and some others.

Marcia

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One good reason to take that extra step of firing on the underglazes is that you might have spent hours painting a lovely pattern and you could ruin it with one stroke of the glaze brush. So not worth it!

I underglaze on dry unfired wares and bisqued wares ... its very versatile and forgiving. I have even corrected a little glitch by adding a dab of underglaze color and refiring the finished piece.

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I did a ceramics residency in Southern France last year. We used commercial glazes purchased in dry batch quantities.Every Tuesday the group went to the ceramics supply store for materials.There were Duncan underglazes which is an American brand, and some others.Marcia

Marcia,

Did you use dry glazes or dry underglazes? Thanks!

Nancy

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Underglazes are wonderful because they are so forgiving and flexible. You can apply them at any point in the process depending on your needs.

 

For instance ... at one point I wanted to make a surface that resembled barn board. So after I had textured it to look like a board I applied a generous coat of a medium brown and fired it. Then I applied the dark brown to the bisque ware and wiped it off so the dark only stayed in the cracks. Fired it again. Then I applied various shades of color to make it look realistic and fired again. The first coat on some of the pots in your picture is a solid color ... I would fire that before starting to paint on the designs. Then if I messed up I would just have to re do the design not the whole solid color too.

 

These firings are as low as I can go to just set in the colors. I'm saying 013 but I might even have fired lower ... 018??

 

For people taking the time to do intricate design work it is totally worth it to fire to preserve your hard work.

If all you are doing is painting on a straight line or something simple ... the trick is to brush the glaze ONCE over the design then let it dry totally before doing the second coat. The first swish will not smear it (usually) but the second one on a wet surface will.

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Most likely these are encapsulated cadmium stains in a slip with a clear glaze. As to the firing temp, it could be from 06 to cone 6. Fiestaware back in the day used uranium for the bright yellow, orange and reds but cadmium encapsulated in a zirconium shell is what is used for these colors today, generally

Wyndham

 

 Uranium Glazes, Yum... that's gotta be food safe.

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