Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Can you tell geography is not my strong suit?? It is especially not a good thing when planning flights with stop overs. I have flown some weird routes .... and not to gain air miles. : - )

Now I know why you leave a trail of rocks around the planet!! You may just be able to find your way back home! Don't follow the floating ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Norm ... I wish you had done a control piece with no holes in it.

I don't always remember to put holes in closed forms but am very patient with my drying ... nothing fired til bone dry and I don't have explosions. This is with stoneware bodies, not the porcelain. I would not recommend doing it but I sometimes forget.

 

Of course the dominant fact is how much you care about the piece or if you need the whole kiln load of work for a show ... : - )

 

OK ... so I found the rocks (without holes) I wanted to fire so they could float in the lake ... four were bone dry and warm in the house and four were out in the unheated garage ... they felt damp.

Sooooo ..... in  my eternal quest to find answers with the least possible control or even deep thought I decided to bisque fire them all and see what happened. :ph34r:

Now, I wish I had put a hole in one of the damp ones to see if it made any difference but like I said, not much thought here.

I did however put up barriers to protect the rest of my full kiln load ...

Can you guess which rocks were dry and which were damp?? :rolleyes:

This is posted with no attempt to convince anyone else to try it on something they really care about. As your Mom would say, just because Chris jumps in the lake doesn't mean you should!

post-1585-0-63780700-1391881152_thumb.jpg

post-1585-0-63780700-1391881152_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you put 8 rocks in all up?? Looks like 4 survived .Did you know which ones came from the garage? SOrry shouldn't have asked that question.

Hey don't be tough on yourself you were in the throes of grasping floc and defloc! Things should have be easy after that! Life is just not fair..

I'm with your Mum on this one.

Remebemr to vacuum your element grooves :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest JBaymore

Chris,

 

Grog is pretty cheap to buy.... no real economic savings in making your own. ;)

 

best,

 

..................john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at your shards and survivors, I would make a few personal observations. Your quest for answers told you that cold ware that feels damp will have ice in the clay that will hide its amount of wetness, also causing extremes when fired.  Secondly I would think you would want the walls of the "rocks" thinner in order to be flottable.  The survivors look good, and it would be interesting to see the finished pieces.  As I have stated before, I once ran a project with slab construction that used  large river stones (5-8#) as forms the students would roll out 3/8" slabs and wrap completely, paddle to smooth, cut in half on a bevel when leather hard and rejoin. You might try the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris Campbell and I have a challenge to see which of us can fire the thickest greenware.

 

I have various solid clay blocks drying currently, some up to 3 inches thick, with a new custom bisque schedule to fire them.

 

Alexandre Bigot experimented with very slow-firing kilns for architectural sized ceramics before he switched over to using hydraulic presses to form pieces with grog and other material which did not off-gas.

 

Regardless of how slow you fire, there is an absolute maximum thickness you can fire with each clay before developing cracks.

 

Looking at your shards and survivors, I would make a few personal observations. Your quest for answers told you that cold ware that feels damp will have ice in the clay that will hide its amount of wetness, also causing extremes when fired.  Secondly I would think you would want the walls of the "rocks" thinner in order to be flottable.  The survivors look good, and it would be interesting to see the finished pieces.  As I have stated before, I once ran a project with slab construction that used  large river stones (5-8#) as forms the students would roll out 3/8" slabs and wrap completely, paddle to smooth, cut in half on a bevel when leather hard and rejoin. You might try the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I thought she was into creating floating rocks as are used in some Chinese water gardens?  My mistake.  However, if the clay in her shop is near freezing, it certainly put her at a disadvantage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John -- Anything you wold change with my "thick pieces bisque" before I use it next week?

 

                   F/Hr     F      Hold

1  RAMP        60      200   8 hours

RAMP      100      350

3  RAMP      350      950

4  RAMP      100    1,000          

5  RAMP        50     1,150

6  RAMP      400    1,638                           

7  RAMP       108     1,888   30 Minutes

8  RAMP      400     1,100

9  RAMP      200     1,400

 

Look at Jun Kanako's works.

 

best,

 

.............................john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I thought she was into creating floating rocks as are used in some Chinese water gardens?  My mistake.  However, if the clay in her shop is near freezing, it certainly put her at a disadvantage.

I think she is BUT what I've read of Chris she is prob immersed in about 90  ceramic projects, cooking for 40, knitting for charity and washing the cat! All before Breakfast, and smiling!

AND willing to fail better in every one of these ideas.

Chris these are the Scottish potters stones from her Book Floating stones.

Pres, you can see the thickness she uses and they are thinner than Chris's

Artist's name is actually Lotte Glob , my misspelling

post-21244-0-87381600-1392101259_thumb.jpg

post-21244-0-10182700-1392101340_thumb.jpg

post-21244-0-79918600-1392101638_thumb.jpg

post-21244-0-87381600-1392101259_thumb.jpg

post-21244-0-10182700-1392101340_thumb.jpg

post-21244-0-79918600-1392101638_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.