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Failure Is Fine

... and maybe even fun

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#81 Babs

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 06:07 PM

Did you put 8 rocks in all up?? Looks like 4 survived .Did you know which ones came from the garage? SOrry shouldn't have asked that question.

Hey don't be tough on yourself you were in the throes of grasping floc and defloc! Things should have be easy after that! Life is just not fair..

I'm with your Mum on this one.

Remebemr to vacuum your element grooves :D



#82 Chris Campbell

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 06:32 PM

The kiln is already vacuumed ... all wares unloaded ... nothing damaged but the damp rocks.
I had a super heavy thick rock in the garage, but even I was not brave enough to fire it ...
Would have taken out the kiln if it had blown ... : - )

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#83 JBaymore

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 09:31 AM

Chris,

 

Grog is pretty cheap to buy.... no real economic savings in making your own. ;)

 

best,

 

..................john


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#84 Pres

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 09:52 AM

Looking at your shards and survivors, I would make a few personal observations. Your quest for answers told you that cold ware that feels damp will have ice in the clay that will hide its amount of wetness, also causing extremes when fired.  Secondly I would think you would want the walls of the "rocks" thinner in order to be flottable.  The survivors look good, and it would be interesting to see the finished pieces.  As I have stated before, I once ran a project with slab construction that used  large river stones (5-8#) as forms the students would roll out 3/8" slabs and wrap completely, paddle to smooth, cut in half on a bevel when leather hard and rejoin. You might try the same.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#85 Norm Stuart

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 02:32 PM

Chris Campbell and I have a challenge to see which of us can fire the thickest greenware.

 

I have various solid clay blocks drying currently, some up to 3 inches thick, with a new custom bisque schedule to fire them.

 

Alexandre Bigot experimented with very slow-firing kilns for architectural sized ceramics before he switched over to using hydraulic presses to form pieces with grog and other material which did not off-gas.

 

Regardless of how slow you fire, there is an absolute maximum thickness you can fire with each clay before developing cracks.

 

Looking at your shards and survivors, I would make a few personal observations. Your quest for answers told you that cold ware that feels damp will have ice in the clay that will hide its amount of wetness, also causing extremes when fired.  Secondly I would think you would want the walls of the "rocks" thinner in order to be flottable.  The survivors look good, and it would be interesting to see the finished pieces.  As I have stated before, I once ran a project with slab construction that used  large river stones (5-8#) as forms the students would roll out 3/8" slabs and wrap completely, paddle to smooth, cut in half on a bevel when leather hard and rejoin. You might try the same.



#86 Pres

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 02:36 PM

Oh, I thought she was into creating floating rocks as are used in some Chinese water gardens?  My mistake.  However, if the clay in her shop is near freezing, it certainly put her at a disadvantage.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#87 JBaymore

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 06:45 PM

Look at Jun Kanako's works.

 

best,

 

.............................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#88 Norm Stuart

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 12:03 AM

John -- Anything you wold change with my "thick pieces bisque" before I use it next week?

 

                   F/Hr     F      Hold

1  RAMP        60      200   8 hours

RAMP      100      350

3  RAMP      350      950

4  RAMP      100    1,000          

5  RAMP        50     1,150

6  RAMP      400    1,638                           

7  RAMP       108     1,888   30 Minutes

8  RAMP      400     1,100

9  RAMP      200     1,400

 

Look at Jun Kanako's works.

 

best,

 

.............................john



#89 Babs

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 01:23 AM

Oh, I thought she was into creating floating rocks as are used in some Chinese water gardens?  My mistake.  However, if the clay in her shop is near freezing, it certainly put her at a disadvantage.

I think she is BUT what I've read of Chris she is prob immersed in about 90  ceramic projects, cooking for 40, knitting for charity and washing the cat! All before Breakfast, and smiling!

AND willing to fail better in every one of these ideas.

Chris these are the Scottish potters stones from her Book Floating stones.

Pres, you can see the thickness she uses and they are thinner than Chris's

Artist's name is actually Lotte Glob , my misspelling

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