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Failure Is Fine

... and maybe even fun

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#21 Chris Campbell

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 02:21 PM

Not to answer his question but I would imagine that many high school students would not be incredibly accurate about things like glaze thickness, or combinations etc. ... Yes, you can do test tiles ... most group studios i have been in have them looking fine ... but in order to get that result you have to repeat accurately.

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#22 Bob Coyle

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 07:24 PM

Too true Chris... and not only high school students.



#23 Kohaku

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 06:36 PM

This is a 14 inch conga drum (greenware) that I kicked five feet across my studio while loading a bisque kiln.

 

Kids- don't stash your greenware on the floor.

 

Twa_zps51402e7b.jpg


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#24 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 11:01 AM

Awwwwww that hurts (the soul and the heart I mean, not the toe...). So sorry that happened to you, Kohaku. But: we live and learn.

 

Evelyne


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#25 Pres

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 10:27 PM

Ouch, big blow to your ego there, and a good lesson.

 

I am feeling the failure thing a lot of late, as the change in clay bodies has had me stymied as to where to go next. I am taking a little time off to make some new glaze tests, and am redoing a series of pieces I had done in the darker clay in a tan clay until I get this under control. It has me wondering about bisque levels, glaze thicknesses and slip applications. These things I had taken for granted. So failure is frustrating, but it can be good especially when you make your way to the other side!


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#26 Kohaku

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 09:26 AM

Thanks guys. Honestly, it had a few minor issues with proportions, so it was a relatively painless lesson. I get to remake it now...


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#27 Pres

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 01:58 PM

Do Overs! one of the great things about pottery, especially before firing!


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#28 JBaymore

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 10:28 AM

If you truly want to understand learning from failures..... become a woodfirer. :D

 

best,

 

..............john


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#29 Benzine

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 06:41 PM

John, how complicated can it be? You load the kiln, seal it up, start some wood on fire, and keep adding more wood until it gets hot......Simple.....
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#30 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 12:49 PM

 


Care to share a failure that resulted in a learning leap? :unsure:

 

Don't use an outhouse until you look under the seat.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

BWAHHAHAHAA  this is why I love you jim! 


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#31 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 12:52 PM

My reply to the question... just take a brief look at my past posts.. I am sure you find enough to entertain this thread.  I have only been making pottery since may of '12.  After taking a 5 week (once per week) class at the local art museum I decided to go out and buy a pottery wheel and use a hand me down kiln from my father in law.  I have been using manufactured glazes and haven't even mixed my own yet, so I have a lot more to learn. I just ordered some dry mix from glaze mixer so to avoid screwing it all up.  We will see if I can trust the online recipes. lol 


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#32 Chris Campbell

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 04:32 PM

John, how complicated can it be? You load the kiln, seal it up, start some wood on fire, and keep adding more wood until it gets hot......Simple.....

 

I keep waiting for John to answer this post .... now I am afraid his brain might have exploded!!!! :D


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TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#33 Benzine

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 08:44 PM

 

John, how complicated can it be? You load the kiln, seal it up, start some wood on fire, and keep adding more wood until it gets hot......Simple.....

 

I keep waiting for John to answer this post .... now I am afraid his brain might have exploded!!!! :D

 

He "liked" the post, so he found it to be, at the least, amusing.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#34 JBaymore

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 10:06 PM

I'm trying to think of an appropriately witty comeback.  B)

 

best,

 

...............john


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#35 Babs

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 10:43 PM

Well I got a bit rash with the resist brush on a no. of teapots, where the lids sit and as it was a tenmoku glaze the white clay body exposed was ugly. I then heated and coated the area with, a don't ask me why, C03 glaze and fired the said pots to C03...result a beautiful subtle glaze, satin, over all the  pots, ugly areas acceptable but shiny!! Lots of lessons here but a new glaze for me! 

Wouldn't have thought of double firing a high fired glaze to that Cone after first firing but it's worth it.



#36 Babs

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 03:06 AM

Perhaps this should be called unexpected outcome, because of the negative association of the F word. Shoulsd be banned really! Esp. by teachers.



#37 Chris Campbell

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 11:32 AM

Actually,  I use the "F" word .... Failure that is ... on purpose. 

Everyone fails and in most cases, lives to  tell the tale.

Make mistakes ... just don't keep making the same mistake. :D


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#38 Babs

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 02:04 AM

Yes Chris, how right you are! Failing is an important learning point or can be. Positive lessons can be learned, depends on the atmosphere and the reaction to the failure, not the person but the action of the person, some people cannot separate those two.

 Still wouldn't say it out loud unless I was sure of the person's  confidence. Probably ask a few questions, get the thoughts going etc. Why what to try next etc. 

Failure is used as a pejorative, hard to get away from that.

Ability to cope with the situation. Expecting too much etc, an easy ride... Not succeeding needs to happen.

Going back to the drawing board etc all comes with positive self esteem which all students do not have.

For me, part of the course, work it out, like to think I learn from failure but quite often do things hoping  that, hey I might just get away with that this time, call me dumb??? Better than Failure??

 



#39 Chris Campbell

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 11:19 AM

"For me, part of the course, work it out, like to think I learn from failure but quite often do things hoping that, hey I might just get away with that this time, call me dumb??? Better than Failure??"

I hear you! If I had a dollar for every time I wasted effort chasing a crack in green ware ....

Chris Campbell
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#40 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 07:41 AM

It is a huge part of the learning curve. I hope you post some pics of the kiln load, Chris. Any failures especially (if any) and tell us what you gleaned from them. To me, that is what "failures" provide.
Marcia




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