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ayjay

Redart

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ayjay    119

I'm starting to get away from bought glazes and mixing my own instead, mostly from previously published recipes but I like to give them a tweak here and there,. (firing to ^6 Ox)

 

I often see Redart listed as a glaze ingredient and am wondering if any red earthenware clay will provide a good substitute or is there something special about Redart which makes it particularly suitable as a glaze ingredient?

 

I have access to some Fremington clay and obviously any other clay available at suppliers here.

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OffCenter    82

Earthenware clays aren't interchangeable but some may be close enough to sub for each other, especially if the earthenware clay is a low percentage of the glaze. You may get a glaze that works but it will not be the same glaze. You can compare the two clays you mentioned here:

http://digitalfire.com/4sight/material/redart_1191.html

and here:

http://digitalfire.com/4sight/material/fremington_clay_320.html?logout=yes

 

Jim

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oldlady    1,323

it would be good to know where "here" is.   in USA?

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oldlady    1,323

ok, jim, 

 

the recipe i have for a red clay that fires at cone 6 is made up of only 2 ingredients.  half redart and half XX saggar.   it is very hard to break.  i have had pieces fall 6 feet to concrete and not break or chip.  it rings nicely, too.  why does it work????

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OffCenter    82

ok, jim, 

 

the recipe i have for a red clay that fires at cone 6 is made up of only 2 ingredients.  half redart and half XX saggar.   it is very hard to break.  i have had pieces fall 6 feet to concrete and not break or chip.  it rings nicely, too.  why does it work????

 

The weathering and sedimentary process that resulted in Redart deposits also created a unique inverted chain crystal in that clay's phyllosilicate minerals that just happens to fit perfectly into the montmorillonite-smectite polly strands of colloid crystals in the more sedimentary XX Saggar producing partial reverse liquefaction.

 

Jim

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oldlady    1,323

love your answer.   thank you.  hey, axe, you listening??

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Biglou13    202

love your answer.   thank you.  hey, axe, you listening??

Axe doesn't like 2 part clays........

 

 

ok, jim, 

 

the recipe i have for a red clay that fires at cone 6 is made up of only 2 ingredients.  half redart and half XX saggar.   it is very hard to break.  i have had pieces fall 6 feet to concrete and not break or chip.  it rings nicely, too.  why does it work????

 

 

The weathering and sedimentary process that resulted in Redart deposits also created a unique inverted chain crystal in that clay's phyllosilicate minerals that just happens to fit perfectly into the montmorillonite-smectite polly strands of colloid crystals in the more sedimentary XX Saggar producing partial reverse liquefaction.

 

Jim

Jim are you being funny or is that real clayspeak

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oldlady    1,323

i just looked at all my own pots and found that there are 3 of them made in that clay.  the only thing that shows the color is the bottom which had been waxed before glazing.  i can take pictures but not post them here since i just don't seem to get them right.  the color is the color of redart.  plain red brown.  make up 5 pounds and try it. it is very smooth but you could add grog since it is inert, (i think) and won't affect much more than tooth and color.

 

i stopped using it because my hands were constantly stained by it.  it  is a really good clay.

 

i used the cement mixer at Foxcross Pottery and just tossed in a bag of each, some water and turned it on.  Del Martin had set up the cement mixer years ago and allowed me to use it.  i took home 6 or 8 five gallon buckets of fresh clay each time.

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Wyndham    98

You could try gold art or any other clay but it might not vitrify at cone 6 or it might over fire at cone 6 and become a glaze puddle.

 

Make up a sample test tile and fire it your next cone 6 firing and see what it looks like, then weight it and write this in a note pad or glaze book. Soak the test tile over night in water, take  and towel dry it and weigh it again. Note the difference in weight if any, this is the of  water absorption. If it's 1% or so that's vitrified the higher the water content the more pourous the clay.

 

Testing is a lot of fun in both clay making and glazing

 

Wyndham

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Out of curiosity could you make that two part clay with Goldart as opposed to Redart?

no, because Goldart is a stoneware clay. Redart is a low fire clay.

Marcia

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OffCenter    82

 

love your answer.   thank you.  hey, axe, you listening??

Axe doesn't like 2 part clays........

 

 

ok, jim, 

 

the recipe i have for a red clay that fires at cone 6 is made up of only 2 ingredients.  half redart and half XX saggar.   it is very hard to break.  i have had pieces fall 6 feet to concrete and not break or chip.  it rings nicely, too.  why does it work????

 

The weathering and sedimentary process that resulted in Redart deposits also created a unique inverted chain crystal in that clay's phyllosilicate minerals that just happens to fit perfectly into the montmorillonite-smectite polly strands of colloid crystals in the more sedimentary XX Saggar producing partial reverse liquefaction.

 

Jim

 

Jim are you being funny or is that real clayspeak

 

 

Just another half-assed attempt at humor.

 

Jim

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Wyndham    98

EPK is a high fire clay as is ball clay. Goldart can be used, the effects may not be the same as expected and may turn out uugly as a garbage pail kid but it will give a wealth of information whether good or bad on learning about glazing.

Wyndham

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Biglou13    202

 

no, because Goldart is a stoneware clay. Redart is a low fire clay.

Marcia

 

are you saying you cant use a stone ware and low fire clay together in a clay body?

or is that the case for a 2 part clay body only?

is there literature rating dry material clay   temps  i know epk high  lizella earthenware     what about om4 and a host of other "usual suspects"

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bciskepottery    925
Biglou13    202

I've had 1st one on ipad. Just haven't got around to studying... BIG thanks. Information dense material. It will have to wait till weekend my head is overloaded with classes at work. That s a clay 101 class in one post!

Trying to decipher cryptic pop culture images......

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OffCenter    82

I've had 1st one on ipad. Just haven't got around to studying... BIG thanks. Information dense material. It will have to wait till weekend my head is overloaded with classes at work. That s a clay 101 class in one post!

Trying to decipher cryptic pop culture images......

 

 

Take some of those with a grain of salt. The first one is good except for a minor inaccuracy that only bothers me because I live in Lizella. Lizella Clay has never been mined by Burns' Brick. (That was Ocmulgee.) And while it is used as an earthenware it is more accurately described as a mid-range stoneware. But the second one, even though from the most high Alfred University, is out of date info of dubious accuracy which made me lose interest in the others.

 

Jim

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