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What Is The Most Incorrect "rule" You Ever Heard For Pottery?

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#81 Pres

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 05:22 PM

On teachers, the classroom, and success, I came to believe that in Elementary school the success of the art lesson was 90% dependent on the teacher, choice of media, teaching style, supervision, and organization. In Junior High it was more like 60/40 with the onus on the teacher. Then in HS more like 50/50. So in my ceramics classroom, there were some cone 6 pots with cone 06 glazes on them. Specifically, reds, and greens that really could only occur at low fire. They were not red, and had run to the base of the pot glueing down to an old crusty shelf piece that they had been on. I also had a piece with a particular ^6 glaze that really was ^5 called sea green pearl.  The demonstration pot showed that the glaze could not go below 2 inches from the bottom of the pot without running off. Part of my 50%.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#82 TJR

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 07:00 PM

 

 

6 years ago I was given a small programmable kiln. I was reassured that since it was computer controlled it didn't need to be watched.....you guessed it. One fried mother board, one garage fire later; and $139,000 poorer, I learned that that was not a good rule

 
Sorry to hear about that! My kiln shed caught on fire once, but I saved it and even if I hadn't it would have only cost about $1,000 to replace it. The problem was that the plug on the small kiln had worked lose and caused and arc. I've never heard of a kiln actually causing a fire because the kiln would just burn out before doing something to cause a fire (unless the potter did something really stupid like placing the kiln too close to something flamable). Was your fire caused by the wiring?
 
Jim

Mother board burned out, drew too much power so the wiring arced. The bad thing was that the wiring was behind a cabinet filled with reloading supplies....Yup, gun powder. I now have a dedicated kiln shed with seperate sub panel. The walls are cinder block and thewiring comes up through the cement floor.

 

In Canada we always store our gun powder right on top of the kiln. otherwise it freezes.[the gun powder, that is]

TJR.



#83 Pres

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 07:07 PM

I take it that isn't black powder! :)


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#84 Babs

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 07:28 PM

thought frozen gunpowder would be the safest??!!






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