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Books About Nerikomi


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#1 ksriemer

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 03:08 AM

Hello everybody :-)

This is my first forums entry and I am hoping that someone can help me.

I am looking to find books about Nerikomi in English (or German) language. I was searching in the web and have found some books in Japanese language but nothing in English. I would love to find a book which explains how Nerikomi works, what to consider and some patterns explained step by step to get started.

 

Apparently once you get it you are kind of self creating your patterns, or so...

 

Anyway, I have ordered the books in Japanese language - even I cant speak Japanese, this shows you how desperately I am looking for more info ;-)

 

Thanks very much for tips and links.

All very much appreciated.

Cheers, Kathrin



#2 Benzine

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 08:48 AM

With a quick internet search, I found there are at least a handful of YouTube videos.  I find that's never a bad place to start.

 

I'm sure Marcia will know some books that will help.

 

Unfortunately, John won't be around the forums much for a while, because I'm sure he would also have several sources he could recommend.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#3 Chris Campbell

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 09:53 AM

I use nerikome techniques as do many other colored clay artists. Check out the clay lessons area of my site. I also teach workshops on the process as well as coloring your own clay. Google colored clay and you might get more hits. You can also learn a lot from the polymer clay techniques. E mail me if you want a more info.
www.ccpottery.com

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Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
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#4 ksriemer

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 11:46 PM

Hi everybody,

 

Thanks for your tips so far. Of course I have looked on youtube and I agree you can get some idea. However, I would like to have a book to read a bit more and get it better explained step by step as in the videos they jump.

 

I am also living in Sydney, Australia and - thanks for the workshop offer - cannot join workshops in the US.

 

The idea with the polymer clay is very clever. I will look closer into it.

 

Many thanks :-)

Vielen Dank!

 

Cheers, Kathrin



#5 Chris Campbell

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 10:39 AM

I wish there was a book I could recommend but I have not personally found one yet ... this is why I tend to buy the polymer clay books and adapt them to earthen clays.

Two I highly recommend are:

"The Art of Polymer Clay" by Donna Kato

"Polymer Clay Color Inspirations" by Lindly Haunani and Maggie Maggio.

 

Basically, with earthen clays, you have to keep all parts at the same level of humidity, use yogurt thick slip to join sections, you dry them very slowly to avoid cracks and you do controlled coolings in your firing to avoid cracks.

Someday, I will write a book!!

Right after I make the Youtube videos ... which will be right after I try some new techniques ... which will be right after I get this next batch made ... which will be right after I get off this computer. :rolleyes:


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#6 OffCenter

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 11:27 AM

Two books I'm looking to: (1) John Britt's "The Complete Guide to Cone 6 Glazes" and (2) Chris Campbell's "Colored Clay".

 

Jim


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#7 Benzine

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 12:46 PM

Two books I'm looking to: (1) John Britt's "The Complete Guide to Cone 6 Glazes" and (2) Chris Campbell's "Colored Clay".

 

Jim

What a coincidence, I'm waiting for Jim Sandefur's "How to Settle Disputes with Neighbors".


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#8 OffCenter

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 03:51 PM

 

Two books I'm looking to: (1) John Britt's "The Complete Guide to Cone 6 Glazes" and (2) Chris Campbell's "Colored Clay".

 

Jim

What a coincidence, I'm waiting for Jim Sandefur's "How to Settle Disputes with Neighbors".

 

 

Oh yeah, like you never have to pull a gun on your neighbors.


E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#9 Benzine

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 09:09 PM

 

 

Two books I'm looking to: (1) John Britt's "The Complete Guide to Cone 6 Glazes" and (2) Chris Campbell's "Colored Clay".

 

Jim

What a coincidence, I'm waiting for Jim Sandefur's "How to Settle Disputes with Neighbors".

 

 

Oh yeah, like you never have to pull a gun on your neighbors.

 

Can't say I have....yet.  Though, to be fair, one of the neighboring houses is a rental, so there have been a couple families in and out, since we've been here, and the other house, has been empty, for over a year. 

However, I'm not far from a large city, and even closer to a lot of farmland, which are the perfect ingredients for people, who like to make meth.  And that's why I'm interested in your book, because such an encounter is perfectly plausible in the near future.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#10 jiao-tai

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 12:26 AM

I only just saw this now.

Jo Connell wrote a book about colored clay  published by A&C Black.

Curtis Benzle has published something in English,

I was part of a distance learning program at Canberra in 2004 and the photos they made for the class are on youtube.

You don't really need a book.

Several people from Australia have come to the classes I give in Honolulu every year. Get a cheap flight and join us next time.

 

There are many ways to make laminated colored clay and most originated in the west, not where the "word" comes from.

Translucent porcelain "nerikomi" (laminated colored clay) is not historically Japanese. The character for nerikomi is contemporary from the late 1970s. I started using the word to explain to people I talked to where I was living in Japan what I did. Because they knew the word from a television advertisement for coffee and some "nerikomi" coffee cups were available to the first people writing in. So, most people who watched TV knew the word because something free was on offer. It also has other meanings not related to clay. Most of the information which remains on Wikipedia was written by me and altered by someone who didn't like my information about certain aspects of historical pieces that were not identified correctly and they obviously didn't like that being pointed out on the internet. Basically, there are things in collections of museums which are unfortunately labelled incorrectly. It is an obscure subject plus, labels fall off in storage over time. 

 

I have been collecting data for years about it historically by country, chemically, and to do with imaging but, will publish - eventually. It will be more of an academic reference book. It will not be a how to do it book. There is enough on youtube.

 

Here is my website info:

nerikomi.blogspot.com

dorothyfeibleman.blogspot.com

dorothyfeibleman.com - not updated 

 

Here are the you tubes you can look at that will give you a lot of information about how I work with translucent colored porcelains. I do not work in a traditional (since mingei) Japanese block way for tableware. (But, that is demonstrated in one video for how to use the extruder for nerikomi). Most people in the west figure out their own way of getting the image they are after and are not producing a lot of low fire tableware or or stoneware repeats. Porcelain is more popular in Europe and in the USA due to image definition. Because I have been in Japan on and off since 1993 and because Curtis has been there a couple of times, and due to historical reasons, ( porcelain and especially translucent porcelain, was not used for lamination until recently in that area of the world.) I have worked with translucent and non translucent whites intensively since 1995. And, white/white plus color gradations since 1995. I would call that my personal expression. I work with light and the translucency and how the image changes with different angles of light. My imaging is usually structural. Japanese nerikomi is also structural generally but how they obtain their imaging is different unless they are ripping me. Then it can be identified as a derivation of my expression I developed, which is contemporary,& not traditional anywhere historically (translucent white/white & translucent white/white + color gradations = my expression). I have been working with translucent laminated porcelain since 1969.

 

Also, I put the "Magic Tool System" together so that people can think in 3D and make imaging with an extruder and all the other tools together as a system. All images that you can make by hand can also be made using the extruder in a different way than usual for clay. An explanation will be available with the extruder parts from Amaco Brent. Structural imaging for porcelain/clay by extruder for nerikomi type imaging for pots is not historical either. That is my gift to people who think they cannot think in 3D,  but they will, think they can't make something that looks reasonable, but they can.

 

The first one is Begin Japanology. Someone put it on youtube:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7g60JYes-1A

 

This one is how to do it by hand and by machine-I invented parts for the extruder which help the imaging.

The machine parts are patent pending:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQXcqNpGW90

 

These are some on my channel with the how I do it when I demonstrated at Canberra. Greg Daly probably has more film.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=EpKZnkrQ3P8

https://www.youtube....h?v=qMzRS3xNwQY

https://www.youtube....h?v=ZBoPttGiUTc

https://www.youtube....h?v=Byn7O_B_uHI

https://www.youtube....h?v=yjKCyX4PVwQ

 

These are some I did when I was a teacher at the International Ceramic Studio in Kecskemet in Hungary.

https://www.youtube....h?v=XGLfVS2V4VI

https://www.youtube....h?v=onSG08Js3Dk

https://www.youtube....h?v=tK10XY6OpRI

 

End of Message.  DF



#11 oldlady

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 09:26 AM

i have long admired your work.  it is in books that i love to look at.  thank you for making beautiful, inspirational work.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#12 Chris Campbell

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 10:47 AM


Thank you so much for posting all of this great information ... You are an inspiration for colored clay artists everywhere!

Have you ever tried the Skinner blend method for making fast color gradations? I borrowed the technique from the polymer clay world and find it works extremely well with earthen clays. Sure makes for a faster, more interesting result.

http://ccpottery.com...ner-blends.html

I hope to attend one of your workshops someday.

Chris Campbell
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#13 JBaymore

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 11:53 AM

Polymer Clay

 

Am I the only one that finds this often used term slightly annoying and a bit misleading?

 

I can see "moldable plastic", or "formable polymer", or "heat-set plastic" or "heat set polymer", or something like that. But adding the word "clay" on there is stretching the idea a lot, I think.

 

Clay, by definition, (Merriam - Webster) is "an earthy material that is plastic when moist but hard when fired, that is composed mainly of fine particles of hydrous aluminum silicates and other minerals, and that is used for brick, tile, and pottery; specifically : soil composed chiefly of this material having particles less than a specified size."

 

The moldable plastic stuff is not composed of any alumino-silicate, does not have an "earthy" origin, and is not used to the making of brick, tile, or pottery.

 

While the work can sometimes be beautiful, it is "polymer"... it is not "clay".

 

best,

 

.......................john


John Baymore
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

http://www.JohnBaymore.com


#14 Chris Campbell

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 02:31 PM

> I can see "moldable plastic", or "formable polymer", or "heat-set plastic" or "heat set polymer", or something like that. But adding the word "clay" on there is stretching the idea a lot.

Yeah but it would be almost impossible to make 'formable polymer' or 'heat set plastic' sound like fun!

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#15 Grype

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 04:09 PM

Absolutely Speechless. 


- Joseph   /   Every firing is a test. One day I will pass.





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