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Saggar Firing


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#21 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 06:56 AM

Thanks Claypple. I am anxiously awaiting some new salts to try. Going for purple! Must make more pots. Meanwhile. I have 6 test clay bodies for an Ibvara firing. Haven't done it before but it looks amazing.
Raku but with reduction in a solution similar to wallpaper paste.

http://www.bing.com/... firing youtube

Marcia

#22 Benzine

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 10:39 AM

That would be "miracle grow" Benzine....

 

 

Miracle grow or Copper nitrate root killer. I bought 50 pounds of copper nitrate from an Ag supply store. It looks like Lapis, large brilliant blue crystals.

Marcia

 

 

Ah, that would be it.  I've never used it, in my own kiln, but in a college Art Ed class, one of my peers was doing a student taught lesson, involving saw dust firing in a garbage can.  The copper nitrate was one of the things we added.


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#23 Kohaku

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 12:10 PM

I am using thrown sag gars and fire in my raku kiln. I put sawdust , salt, and sprinkle with copper carb, or other nasty things like various salts and sulphates. I am using copper wire for the black lines. I just ordered some manganese salts (danger, danger, bad fumes) for water filters to see what that will do.This series also used Stellite alloy with cobalt , chrome, molybdenum, and tungsten. I got about 5 pounds of it a while ago. Sounded interesting for a pottery alchemist.

Marcia

 

Other questions...

 

How much out-gassing is there with a process like this? Worse than just a regular raku session? Will I kill my nearby grape arbor?

 

Do you end up with residue on your kiln, and is it an issue for regular raku? (Heaven forbid that Raku be unpredictable on any level)?

 

Do your thrown saggers have any sort of a locking sill to make them in any way air-tight?

 

This is all way off the reservation for me... but I'm very intrigued.


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#24 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 12:45 PM

I make thrown sag gars out of raku clay. I used to make them with galleys for a tighter seal, but I find more flexibility if I don't. I can see a little flashing where the seal was not tight.There is not much out gassing. There is a little smell but not much. Residue stays inside the sag gars for the most part.
I do this in a kiln shed 10 x 19 with large steel barn doors that I open up, across from an open door plus two exhaust fans near the high ceiling.I have not seen any residue on the fiber in my kiln.


Marcia

#25 Marc McMillan

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 03:00 PM

I find the possibilities endless.I am working on more color...green right now.Marc, how high do you go with the aluminum sag gars. My friend advises about 500 C or 950 F.

Marcia

 

Marcia - Greens. Awesome. I need to experiment more.

When I do aluminum saggars I go to at least 1200F and sometimes 1300F. My quest is to understand how I can get yellows consistently. I love saggar firing...you can have an idea of what it will look like, but you never ever know!

 

hmmm...my avatar disappeared...I'll have to reload.

 

Marc



#26 Kohaku

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 05:13 PM

I make thrown sag gars out of raku clay. I used to make them with galleys for a tighter seal, but I find more flexibility if I don't. I can see a little flashing where the seal was not tight.There is not much out gassing. There is a little smell but not much. Residue stays inside the sag gars for the most part.
I do this in a kiln shed 10 x 19 with large steel barn doors that I open up, across from an open door plus two exhaust fans near the high ceiling.I have not seen any residue on the fiber in my kiln.


Marcia

 

Can you stack multiple saggars... or fire regular raku wares on top of a single saggar?


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#27 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 06:23 PM

I don't think there would be any problem stacking. I haven't done it. My sag gars are fairly large enough to fill the kiln. But I have been thinking of stacking pots IN the sag gars. I need to make pots to fit the sag gars.
Why can't auto correct get saggars right?

Marcia

#28 minspargal

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 07:26 AM

Very nice indeed!



#29 wirerabbit

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 04:24 PM

Nice pots, Marci,

 

Hope to do some of this "higher fire saggar work" soon. I have a concrete pad ready for a metal structure. Then I will have a place to put all my raku conversion kilns. May even have one that can go past raku temps.

 

Is 1600 your target temp for this type of work? What effects do you see if you accidentally over or under fire the saggars?

 

Thanks for sharing.



#30 OffCenter

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 09:28 PM

Nice pots, Marci,

 

Hope to do some of this "higher fire saggar work" soon. I have a concrete pad ready for a metal structure. Then I will have a place to put all my raku conversion kilns. May even have one that can go past raku temps.

 

Is 1600 your target temp for this type of work? What effects do you see if you accidentally over or under fire the saggars?

 

Thanks for sharing.

 

You can sagger fire to any cone you like. I go to cone 6 and 10.

 

Jim


E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#31 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 09:52 PM

foilgroup copy

I fired some foil saggars today. And the potassium manganese came before I did the second batch.
http://ceramicartsda...foilgroup-copy/



#32 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 09:56 PM

Nice pots, Marci,

 

Hope to do some of this "higher fire saggar work" soon. I have a concrete pad ready for a metal structure. Then I will have a place to put all my raku conversion kilns. May even have one that can go past raku temps.

 

Is 1600 your target temp for this type of work? What effects do you see if you accidentally over or under fire the saggars?

 

Thanks for sharing.

 

 

Nice pots, Marci,

 

Hope to do some of this "higher fire saggar work" soon. I have a concrete pad ready for a metal structure. Then I will have a place to put all my raku conversion kilns. May even have one that can go past raku temps.

 

Is 1600 your target temp for this type of work? What effects do you see if you accidentally over or under fire the saggars?

 

Thanks for sharing.

Hey tay! Come on down and fire with me sometime. Bring Marsha.



#33 Pugaboo

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 10:03 PM

Thank you so much for posting; your work you so beautiful. Your animal silhouette vases in your gallery really inspire me as well. In fact seeing those helped me be brave enough to make my first vase, ended up completely different than yours but yours are what got me to thinking about the possibilities and the shape.

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#34 oldlady

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 10:42 PM

love it all, the classic shape, the colorful finished look, the unexpected way of firing.  great stuff.  congrats


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#35 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 07:22 AM

Thank you so much for posting; your work you so beautiful. Your animal silhouette vases in your gallery really inspire me as well. In fact seeing those helped me be brave enough to make my first vase, ended up completely different than yours but yours are what got me to thinking about the possibilities and the shape.

Terry

Terry, 

You are a painter and drawer as well as a sculptor. Many people can't draw, but if you can you should use it.

M



#36 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 07:30 AM

Thanks for the inspiration Marcia. I've been doing more Ferric chloride/Aluminum saggar firing recently. I will have to do another clay saggar firing this weekend!

Marc

Mark, your foil saggar pots are really beautiful. I think you must be using a heavier dose of the Ferric chloride. My mix was more than 6 years old. Maybe it was much less potent. Nice work in your gallery.

Marcia



#37 Marc McMillan

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 11:25 AM

 

Thanks for the inspiration Marcia. I've been doing more Ferric chloride/Aluminum saggar firing recently. I will have to do another clay saggar firing this weekend!

Marc

Mark, your foil saggar pots are really beautiful. I think you must be using a heavier dose of the Ferric chloride. My mix was more than 6 years old. Maybe it was much less potent. Nice work in your gallery.

Marcia

 

 

 

Thank you very much Marcia. I love your work. Gotta love that peach! 

Would I assume correctly you don't use a huge bed of sawdust or keep it away from the piece? 

Mine saggar vessels tend to have a heavy carbon mark at the bottom.

As far as my Ferric - I use three brushed coats of 100% strength, and yes it is relatively 'fresh.'

 

I'm wishing I could make it to Minneapolis for your seminar. Perhaps I can arrange a business trip. 

Best Regards,

Marc



#38 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 01:20 PM

 

 

Thanks for the inspiration Marcia. I've been doing more Ferric chloride/Aluminum saggar firing recently. I will have to do another clay saggar firing this weekend!

Marc

Mark, your foil saggar pots are really beautiful. I think you must be using a heavier dose of the Ferric chloride. My mix was more than 6 years old. Maybe it was much less potent. Nice work in your gallery.

Marcia

 

 

 

Thank you very much Marcia. I love your work. Gotta love that peach! 

Would I assume correctly you don't use a huge bed of sawdust or keep it away from the piece? 

Mine saggar vessels tend to have a heavy carbon mark at the bottom.

As far as my Ferric - I use three brushed coats of 100% strength, and yes it is relatively 'fresh.'

 

I'm wishing I could make it to Minneapolis for your seminar. Perhaps I can arrange a business trip. 

Best Regards,

Marc

 

I follow the Riggs method of saggars. Not much sawdust and the pot sits up and out the the combustibles. In the clay sag gars, I am trying for greens. The peach is nice too. Ine the foil saggars I want to work of colors and spots. The sugar went too black but the silver nitrate granules

show potential. 

Marcia



#39 Kohaku

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 02:17 PM

So- I'm considering experimenting with using a sagger firing with some of my Raku surfaces. There are two primary things I'd like to see...

 

1) Significant 'smoking' or blackening of non-glazed surfaces.

2) Intermediate (and variable) levels of reduction in the glazed areas.

 

I'm going to do some tests in my paragon Firefly.

 

Anyhow- I've thrown a sagger. I plan to glaze a piece (with my standard Raku glazes), nest it in the sagger (surrounded by newspaper) and fire rapidly to 1850 degrees (fasted ramp I can get). Immediate cool-down to follow.

 

For anyone who's done sagger firing...

 

1) Aside from a tight vessel, are there any mechanisms for sealing the sagger?

2) Any suggestions for the firing profile?

3) How much combustable material should I put in the sagger? Ideally, I don't want a flat copper surface...

4) Any other suggestions?

5) Do I have a snowball's chance in Hades of achieving either of my goals with this approach?

 

I'm interested in a Raku-like surface effect (particularly the blackened clay body)... but avoiding the worst of the thermal shock that makes it difficult to fire some assembled, flat, or delicate pieces.


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#40 MMB

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 10:16 PM

From my experiences make sure the salt does not touch the pot. When it burns, if Im not mistaken, it burns hotter and the clay closest will shrink and you will get a nasty cracked spot. You mention glaze? I dont think glazing is possible, Ive only tried once and it didnt turn out so well. Although before I type a bunch Ceramic Arts Daily has a nice little post that could help you out.

 

http://ceramicartsda...in-a-raku-kiln/

 

Ive used flower pots as saggars and Ive also done the "mummy" technique where you use burlap and slip then wrap it and let it dry. Kinda like a one time use saggar. It worked for me because I had a ton of local clay that was kinda useless, but a little paper pulp then applied to the burlap it worked just fine. As for the firing Ive always turned up the heat and let it go. When using a saggar it takes the beating from the fast heating and not your pot. Test at all temps but do remember that the longer you stay at a temp especially hitting that 1600-1700 F mark you can actually burn off any flashing that might have already been on your pot. And if youre looking to achieve blacks you dont have to go that high. Here is a little pdf site I stumbled upon a while back.

 

http://users.skynet....anPMIJA09lr.pdf






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