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Plate Repair


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#1 Kohaku

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 04:14 PM

This is a spin-off from 'Benzine's 'what do you do with your pottery seconds' thread.

 

I've generated a couple of broken raku plates (single, clean fracture). These are intended to be decorative only. I'm considering repairing and selling.

 

This would obviously have to be a very clean repair... and I'm realizing that I'm unsure how to proceed. I'm assuming that crazy glue is the way to go... but what's the best way to secure the halves until they set? There's no easy way to clamp or bind the halves, since any non-horizontal force will cause them to buckle.

 

Am I just going to have to firmly hold the halves in place? I'm worried that my hands will move too much...

 

Note- I'm planning to put some kind of backing on after gluing the halves... maybe felt (to allow for easier hanging).

 

(OffCenter - maybe half jokingly- recommended Kintsugi in another thread. Between the cost and the poison-ivy-like effects, I'm a bit scared to go there)

 

Example below.

 

8569863_orig.jpg


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#2 perkolator

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 04:26 PM

in this case, especially if intending to sell the item, it would be best to just remake the plate so you can stand by your product.  sure you can glue it together, but it would be very unprofessional to sell something like this.  

 

to glue, i would think keeping it on a flat surface and taping is going to be the best you can do besides making some sort of cradle each side of the plate for clamping.

 

as for the crack, what clay body are you using?  a porous sculpture body or an actual raku body might be a whole lot more resistant to doing this.



#3 Kohaku

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 04:37 PM

in this case, especially if intending to sell the item, it would be best to just remake the plate so you can stand by your product.  sure you can glue it together, but it would be very unprofessional to sell something like this.  

 

to glue, i would think keeping it on a flat surface and taping is going to be the best you can do besides making some sort of cradle each side of the plate for clamping.

 

as for the crack, what clay body are you using?  a porous sculpture body or an actual raku body might be a whole lot more resistant to doing this.

 

Yeah- the professionalism is a whole separate question. I have mixed feelings... but given that Raku is quite crack-laden to begin with, and that this is a purely decorative piece, I'm more ambivalent here than I would be with anything functional.

 

In this case, the clay is SPS seamix with sand. The problem with most designated Raku bodies is that they're quite heavy on the grog. As a consequence, they grab my tools when I'm carving. This tends to mar the flow of the design.


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#4 atanzey

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 04:42 PM

If your intent is decorative only, the repair could include a wire 'mount' that would be permanent, and create either a display stand or a hanging point. 

 

Alice



#5 Biglou13

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 05:02 PM

http://www.moraappro...-diy-repair-kit

 

no poison ivy effects


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#6 OffCenter

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 07:01 PM

No, I wasn't kidding when I suggested kintsugi.

 

Jim


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#7 Kohaku

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 07:34 PM

No, I wasn't kidding when I suggested kintsugi.

 

Jim

 

I'm starting to really think that I have to give this a shot- seems more 'honest'- in a sense- to highlight a fracture rather that just gluing the thing. The kit in Biglou's link looks like a good option...


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#8 Biglou13

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 07:34 PM

.....with poison ivy like effects

 

http://www.mejiro-ja...sugi-repair-kit

 

Caution: Some people might have allergic reactions to urushi lacquer. In case your skin is exposed to urushi, wash it off with cooking oil immediately, then use soap to clean further. It is highly recommended to use cold cream or vaseline. Spread a small amount between the hands and massage into the face, neck and arms before handling urushi.

 

gold or silver , poison ivy or not... i'm with jim.....


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#9 flowerdry

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 08:43 PM

The WAY this plate broke is wonderful.  I would consider highlighting the fracture by mounting both pieces on wood or some other appropriate background and either off set them slightly or just put some amount of distance between them.

 

Doris.


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#10 Mark C.

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 09:21 PM

If you want it to stay glued forever-use JB wield glue-use the fast set two part epoxy sold everywhere-

I would not consider selling it-just make another one and hang the repaired one on your fence.

Mark


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#11 windingpathpottery

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 12:13 AM

Nice plate. If not for the representational carving I'd suggest a band of gold or red, something obvious.

I've done that on a raku bowl with gold and it looked very good.

Paul Soldner said, "If you make a mistake, make more of it."

I've found that if it's not a simple repair it's faster and easier to make another.

If I were trying to keep the pieces together I'd have something heavy on each side pressing inward, some kind of vise arrangement.

 



#12 Surubee

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 01:48 AM

When I did some volunteer work reconstructing pottery from archaeological excavations, we used sand trays to set the bottom piece at whatever angle was necessary and glued the next piece above it so that gravity helped hold it in place. Later when it was dry, we would turn it in another direction and add another piece, again held in place with gravity until the glue set. We used white glue (like elmers) because it was not meant to ever be exposed to water, but I think this method would work with any type of glue.



#13 OffCenter

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 08:20 AM

I don't think you should think of this as a repair job. Gluing broken pottery (except for historical or archaeological preservation) is not a good idea. Windingpath's Soldner quote is right on. Think of this as a work in progress, not a repair job.

 

Jim


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#14 Diane Puckett

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 12:38 PM

I agree with Doris. I could see this mounted on a beautiful piece of walnut with space between the halves. I would even consider putting gold leaf on the broken edge.
Diane Puckett
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#15 Kohaku

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 01:50 PM

OK guys... I'm diving in on this kintsugi thing. Kir ordered (I bought the trad version from Japan, posion Ivy be damned).

 

I may come screaming for help in a couple weeks!

 

I break enough raku ware, though (and frequently non-reproducible, given the raku process) that this seems a good addition to my skill pallette.

 

Of course... the site I looked at states that Japanese artisens will study for years to learn to do this properly...


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#16 Idaho Potter

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 03:01 PM

I agree with Doris and Diane,  I would either find a way to make a rack (holder) for each half and beautify the exposed edge, or find some way of hanging them.  It broke after the post-firing reduction as I see the exposed break isn't carbonized.  You can take a black marking pen (Sharpie) and leave it like that, or I like Diane's idea of gold accent (gold pens or even Rub & Buff).  You've heard of diptych (a two piece painting where the viewer fills the intervening blank area with their {gestalt}  imagination).  I think your dual fishes fit the bill very well.

 

The one thing I wouldn't do is glue the pieces together.  Start a new trend with diptychs or even triptychs--and do them on purpose.  I love the idea, but don't want to steal your thunder, so I will wait awhile.  Your work is so imaginative, this should fit right in.

 

Shirley



#17 Kohaku

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 11:01 PM

I agree with Doris and Diane,  I would either find a way to make a rack (holder) for each half and beautify the exposed edge, or find some way of hanging them.  It broke after the post-firing reduction as I see the exposed break isn't carbonized.  You can take a black marking pen (Sharpie) and leave it like that, or I like Diane's idea of gold accent (gold pens or even Rub & Buff).  You've heard of diptych (a two piece painting where the viewer fills the intervening blank area with their {gestalt}  imagination).  I think your dual fishes fit the bill very well.

 

The one thing I wouldn't do is glue the pieces together.  Start a new trend with diptychs or even triptychs--and do them on purpose.  I love the idea, but don't want to steal your thunder, so I will wait awhile.  Your work is so imaginative, this should fit right in.

 

Shirley

 

Well- I see no lack of broken plates in my future- so plenty of room for experimentation. The many joys of Raku!


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