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What Do You Do With Your Pottery 'seconds'?

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#41 TJR

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 02:45 PM

If you don't smash them, someone will pick them out of the garbage and put then in a garage sale for a buck. My mother-in-law will see them ,buy them and give them away as gifts, telling everyone that her son-in-law is the potter who made them.

True story.

TJR.



#42 MikeFaul

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 04:23 PM

Ergo "plinking" AKA Mr. wonky form meet mister Glock...

#43 muddylove

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 06:36 PM

I give any really 'good seconds' to close friends and relatives or use them myself.  Any of the bad ones get pinged off with a pellet gun for target practice or smashed with a hammer before being disposed  Lately, I have been using them around my studio/gallery to make things look more artful and interesting for visitors.  Some are in my fish tank in my gallery, some are in my garden as outdoor art.  I use construction adhesive to glue them to boards,  and mount bowls/platters outside on the wall of my studio.  They look nice, and a few pinholes or glaze flaws don't seem to matter when they are part of a mural/decoration on the studio.  I like the idea of a garden wall or gluing them together to make a cool sculpture.   

 

A few years back one of my friends told me he would collect up all his seconds and he would invite local groups to have a smashing party.  They would 'sell' the seconds to smash.  The money raised would go to charity.  Everyone involved would wear safety gear of course.  Some pots were dropped, thrown, hit with bowling balls etc.  I'm sure there are lots of stress relieving creative ways to crush pots.



#44 karan

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 07:43 PM

I put them in a heavy cardboard box- give my teenage son goggles and gloves and a hammer...


Karan Witham-Walsh
Lebanon, Ohio

http://www.etsy.com/...ansPotsAndGlass

#45 SmartsyArtsy

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 08:01 PM

If you do choose to glue that fish platter, you can add some black iron oxide to D/E 3000 glue and it will appear like a raku clear glaze crack.

#46 Mudslinger Ceramics

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 08:05 PM

How fab!!

 

I have a teenage son, his chores will now be:...feed pets...clean up your room...wash your own smelly socks!...smash my awful pots...put the garbage out for collection!

 

Excellent idea.


Mudslinger Ceramics :   www.mudslingerceramics.net

 

'Don't worry about your originality. You couldn't get rid of it even if you wanted to.

It will stick with you and show up for better or for worse in spite of all you or anyone else can do.'

                                                                              - Robert Henri


#47 PotterGrl

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 09:04 AM

I feel so badly throwing them in the trash. Not because I'm upset that it didn't turn out, but rather it seems such a waste. It seems people do try to sell boxes of their shards for use in mosaics on both Etsy and Ebay, but I cannot tell if they are successful in selling those. I was considering on maybe putting a box of shards on Craigslist once I get a full box. I would at least feel like my mess ups were useful to someone ;o) 

 

I've seen videos on youtube of people haveing smash parties at studios :)  Definitely looks like fun. They set up an area outside and take turns throwing the pots, lol.

 

I'm sure my teen son and teen daughter would very much like the smashing part ;o)

 

Wanted to add that my pens/pencils on my desk are in an awesome jar that I made. It has a gallery for a lid, but the lid didn't turn out. I couldn't throw the crock away because I love it, lol.

 

I have 3 mugs/cups in my kitchen that also hold various writing utensiles. Two of them underfired and couldn't be used as a cup, but they're so pretty. The mug had a glaze inside that didn't work right. There are several other things around here that didn't work as their original purpose, and I couldn't give them away/sell them, and it seemed a shame to trash them when they could have other uses in my home :)  I have a bowl that I plan on putting some sort of plant in.



#48 phill

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 10:15 AM

It is hard to smash your own work. 

 

Keeping seconds and selling them or even just giving them away can be a dangerous thing to your overall career as an artist. If you are a hobby potter and don't care to ever attempt to make a living, then disregard this.

 

When we put forth effort and create something we tend to get glossy-eyed at the object and we see all the hard work put into it. We start looking for ways to keep it or talking ourselves into being able to get some profit out of it, because golly we put so much hard work into it we should be getting paid, right?!

 

Well, no, I think we are giving ourselves too much by saying we deserve that. I say smash all but your very best work. I am no leader at this, I have failed many times and now regret giving away the seconds and selling them too, even to my family. I am glad they went to a good home, but now those are the only pieces many of these people have. I have found that those who get seconds hardly ever actually buy your good pottery, and instead just hope to continue getting freebies or are satisfied with that one piece you gave them when you first started out. (This makes them sound dull or selfish or mean, but these are good people with good intentions I am talking about.) Do you see how this is dangerous? Now anytime someone comes over to their house and sees the pottery and your relatives (friends, etc.) tell them your name, you get a bad rap in those people's minds because your old junky pottery is all these new potential customers see.

 

On top of this, people tend to just begin expecting that you will give seconds or sell cheap pottery that "still works well" and will only come for those pieces. Your customer base will begin to build based on reasons I hope you don't care for. Pretty soon you will realize that your junky stuff only sells and your good stuff you are proud of no one really takes a whole lot of notice. 

 

You are only as good as your weakest pot. :)

 

If you struggle with a piece and perhaps you see some potential in it, set it aside and come back to it in a couple weeks. Keep doing this until you decide it is junk and smash it or until you realize that sometimes you just needed to grow a little in your mind's eye and you have a real gem on your hands. BUT be careful, don't give yourself too much credit here and if in doubt, take a photo of it, smash it, and let it go.

 

One more thing. If you give someone a pot, why not give your very best to them? A gift is supposed to be something wonderful, maybe even sacrificial. You should be proud to give the pot away, and if it is a second, you can't be truly proud or it wouldn't be a second so don't give me that bull. If you give your seconds as gifts, what does that say about you and about that other person? 



#49 Babs

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 10:46 PM

Now my kids have finally left home I break them..Before that ,seemed to go thro' mamoth amount of mugs etc.  And then there were the Uni apartments which seemed in ingest a huge amount of pottery.I did go out of my way to provide food in seconds for all the birthday and other social occasions attended by the above people as they never ever brought a plate/casserole home after such occasions....

Break them! Can't think what future archaeologists will think on viewing my on farm land fill.....What rotten potters existed here :blink:  but hey, I won't be here to endure that.



#50 Kohaku

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 11:15 AM

If you do choose to glue that fish platter, you can add some black iron oxide to D/E 3000 glue and it will appear like a raku clear glaze crack.

 

Currently repaired using urushi laquer... just waiting for the bond to finalize so that I can apply the gold powder.

 

Incidentally... I used the hypo-allergenic urushi, wore gloves, rubbed vasoline into every exposed surface... and still earned myself a poison ivy-esque rash. Nasty stuff!


Not all who wander are lost

#51 JBaymore

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 07:05 PM

Incidentally... I used the hypo-allergenic urushi, wore gloves, rubbed vasoline into every exposed surface... and still earned myself a poison ivy-esque rash. Nasty stuff!

 

Is this the place where I say,.......... "I told you so?" ;)  

 

best,

 

......................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#52 Kohaku

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 08:44 PM

 

Incidentally... I used the hypo-allergenic urushi, wore gloves, rubbed vasoline into every exposed surface... and still earned myself a poison ivy-esque rash. Nasty stuff!

 

Is this the place where I say,.......... "I told you so?" ;)  

 

best,

 

......................john

 

 

Have at it- I can take the heat.

 

Scary thing is- I'll need to embark on phase two this weekend (cleaning up the initial join, second round of laquer). Hopefully I'll build up a tolerance.


Not all who wander are lost





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