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My first teapot


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#21 Benzine

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 11:02 PM

I put things up on the blog to be used, not abused. the only time I would get angry is if someone "borrowed" something of mine, and then took credit. That is abusive. I would shudder to think that any one here would do that, especially benzine.Posted Image


Like I tell my students all the time, "I'm not even going to pretend that something that clever is my idea." I'm not saying I haven't come up with a couple project ideas, and approaches, but I've borrowed and altered quite a few projects, from other teachers/ instructors.
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#22 potziller

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 02:01 AM

My very first attempt at a tea pot. I had to share with someone who (might!) care.

Alice


More than just good: excellent - lots to recommend the pot. Now, as my tutor would say, 'now go make another one'! :Dsrc="http://ceramicartsda...t/biggrin.gif">

#23 OffCenter

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 08:30 AM

Great thing about the embroidery hoops is . . . they are cheap!


I just bought 4 round quilting hoops (big versions of embroidery hoops) and one oblong quilting hoop for slump molds. The largest size I could get is 23 inches. I don't know if this is common knowledge or not, but you can buy t-shirt material (called jersey) at fabric shops cut out a circle to fit into the quilting hoop. It is so stretchy that when you put a slab of clay in it, it forms a bowl shape. You can use a large ball to push the slab down for a deeper bowl and can adjust the slack in the material for different shapes. Quilting hoops are perfect for this. Since I can't find any bigger than 23 inches I also bought a few hula hoops and stretch the fabric there held with lots of clamps.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#24 Pres

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 08:49 AM


Great thing about the embroidery hoops is . . . they are cheap!


I just bought 4 round quilting hoops (big versions of embroidery hoops) and one oblong quilting hoop for slump molds. The largest size I could get is 23 inches. I don't know if this is common knowledge or not, but you can buy t-shirt material (called jersey) at fabric shops cut out a circle to fit into the quilting hoop. It is so stretchy that when you put a slab of clay in it, it forms a bowl shape. You can use a large ball to push the slab down for a deeper bowl and can adjust the slack in the material for different shapes. Quilting hoops are perfect for this. Since I can't find any bigger than 23 inches I also bought a few hula hoops and stretch the fabric there held with lots of clamps.

Jim


Great ideas, Jim. Hmmm Hoola hoops are flexy, so you could get nice oval forms also.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#25 ayjay

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 05:31 PM

 

 I don't know if this is common knowledge or not, but you can buy t-shirt material (called jersey) at fabric shops cut out a circle to fit into the quilting hoop. It is so stretchy that when you put a slab of clay in it, it forms a bowl shape.

 

 

Thanks for that: I've got a couple of sling moulds, (that's what I know them as) but I've never been entirely happy with the material I've used for the sling, I'll try and source some t-shirt material,  (ayjay wanders off to find a fat person's washing line).ohmy.png



#26 emptynester

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 11:51 AM

Attached File  teapot.jpg   156.65KB   4 downloadsAttached File  teapot open.jpg   254KB   4 downloads

 

After reading all the fine advice that was given on this thread I was inspired to post my own "first Tea pot". The adult ed class I took gave us a timed challenge to throw the pieces. We then attached them any way we wanted. This is my finished piece.  It holds 12oz.



#27 OffCenter

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 03:34 PM

Looks like you had fun with the handle. This teapot is the opposite of Alice's teapot in that the problem here is that the spout is too high.

 

Jim


E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#28 PresToo

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 05:48 PM

Nice body form, kind of floats off the table. I would work on spouts a bit for more of a funnel like taper. As Off Center says, the spout is too high, and the angle too steep. For a first attempt at a complicated form-fantastic.



#29 emptynester

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 07:33 PM

Alas, the class was canceled so I'm not working on anything now. As soon as we find a studio space I will make up for lost time. Thanks for your input. : )

#30 atanzey

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 10:03 PM

So... I broke the lid of 'first teapot' in transit.  So I made another.  A bit better (no pictures).  Then another (pictures attached).  Getting better, but the spout isn't graceful. 

 

I'm starting to wish I liked hot tea.

 

Alice

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#31 OffCenter

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:17 AM

What is important is that you think this third teapot is better than the first one. If that is how you feel then just imagine how nice your 20th teapot will be.

 

Jim


E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#32 oldlady

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:08 AM

cutting the spout at an angle so the cut is on the same plane as the rim of the teapot will make it more graceful.  hot tea is delicious unless you are only offered Lipton.  that is dishwater.  alice as well, neighbor


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#33 atanzey

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 10:27 AM

Alice!  And we're even closer neighbors than it appears.  We live in central PA on the weekends - it's where my kiln is located.  But during the week, we live in Frederick, Maryland.  'Just across the river'!

 

Thanks for the 'tip' on the spout.  I'll also eventually want more movement in the shape of the spout, but right now, just throwing all the pieces is a start.  And in order to alter it after it's thrown (for a curved tip, for example) I may want to move to a less groggy clay.  Everything gets 'sandy' when I work it.

 

I'm a serious iced tea drinker.  But I do enjoy the occasional cup of plantation mint or raspberry royale. But generally, black tea suits me fine. I've been thinking of visiting a local tea establishment and expanding my horizons. 

 

Alice



#34 oldlady

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 10:45 AM

you're right!  frederick is where i shop and where i can see more people at an intersection than i can at home in a week.


"putting you down does not raise me up."




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