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Repairing Cracked Bisque


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#1 Tikiguy

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 02:37 PM

I just did my first bisque firing. Everything but one item came out great. one cup came out with a hairline crack in the bottom corner, from under and up the side , about a quarter inch on both edges and is all the way through to the inside. Is there a way I repair the hairline crack in bisque or it the cup a total loss?

#2 Benzine

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 02:55 PM

I just did my first bisque firing. Everything but one item came out great. one cup came out with a hairline crack in the bottom corner, from under and up the side , about a quarter inch on both edges and is all the way through to the inside. Is there a way I repair the hairline crack in bisque or it the cup a total loss?


It's probably not worth the time and effort, it would take, to attempt to repair it. It would also probably not be functional, even if you did manage to repair it. Also, the crack could worsen during the further stress of the glaze firing.
Make another to replace it, and use the current one, to experiment with a new glaze combination.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#3 BLT

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 03:42 PM


I just did my first bisque firing. Everything but one item came out great. one cup came out with a hairline crack in the bottom corner, from under and up the side , about a quarter inch on both edges and is all the way through to the inside. Is there a way I repair the hairline crack in bisque or it the cup a total loss?


It's probably not worth the time and effort, it would take, to attempt to repair it. It would also probably not be functional, even if you did manage to repair it. Also, the crack could worsen during the further stress of the glaze firing.
Make another to replace it, and use the current one, to experiment with a new glaze combination.



#4 Kohaku

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 03:43 PM

Definitely agree with Benzine... but if you really want to fix it (for some sentimental reason) magic mud works pretty well...

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#5 BLT

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 03:56 PM

You know, that is totally what I heard over and over from my Ceramic's Professor, don't fool with things, just do another. That being because he knew how easy it was to throw a hundred cups and he knew I was capable. I totally agree with his advise, yet, in my home studio I use paper clay or mix sodium silicate with a small amount of ball clay. (I use sodium silicate to re-attach bisque parts) In this case, it fills the gap, I glaze fire it and found that it has been successful. I stilt it for safety if it does melt through, never has. But my feeling is, it's all an experiment each time the kiln fires up. Learning by mistake only comes by trying. Good luck, try, that's the advise I prefer. It's been successful for me.


[quote name='BLT' date='01 July 2013 - 02:42 PM' timestamp='1372711346' post='38135']

#6 Tikiguy

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 03:58 PM

I was afraid to lose the cup, but it sounds like a lot more work than just slip casting another one.
I am going to use it for glaze testing as suggested, I did that with other broken pieces. This one was just so slight I thought I'd ask if it was worth saving.
Thank you

#7 Pres

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 04:41 PM

I was afraid to lose the cup, but it sounds like a lot more work than just slip casting another one.
I am going to use it for glaze testing as suggested, I did that with other broken pieces. This one was just so slight I thought I'd ask if it was worth saving.
Thank you


How many of these mugs did you cast the first time? None of the others had any sign of a crack? Just curios.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#8 Tikiguy

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 05:07 PM


I was afraid to lose the cup, but it sounds like a lot more work than just slip casting another one.
I am going to use it for glaze testing as suggested, I did that with other broken pieces. This one was just so slight I thought I'd ask if it was worth saving.
Thank you


How many of these mugs did you cast the first time? None of the others had any sign of a crack? Just curios.


I made about 14 mugs. All but the one came out of bisquing just fine.

#9 Pres

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 09:29 PM

OK, just wondering if it was a flaw in pouring, or mold design. For a casting, I really would not take the effort to repair the piece. Use it as a glaze test piece.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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