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What do you collect and why? | June 19, 2013


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#1 lorielle

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 02:04 PM

Potters are collectors. At least most of the ones I know are! I like to collect small objects I pick up while walking. They provide an endless source of inspiration for surface design on my posts. What do you collect and why?
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#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 03:25 PM

I collect clay whistles, especially those that use water to make a warbling sound.
I actually have a plastic one from a market in Central Asia that sounded like a clay one from Spain.
I got one from an old potter last year as a gift. Very nice one.
I do have a very nice collection of pottery /ceramic art that I started in Montana.


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#3 ayjay

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 03:34 PM

I'm that slow I collect dust.

I have a friend who collects pots, he has well over !000, every room of his house looks like this:-

[attachment=2527:IMG_1905-c.jpg]

#4 shinoaddict

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 07:26 PM

I collect tea bowls, mainly shino glazed. wood or gas fired, can't resist buying them. I have about eighty and use them constantly. All sizes for all my needs.
Also some specific potters: John Glick's for his glaze on glaze plates, Jeff Oestreich's carefully impressed tea bowls.. and so much more..

#5 oldlady

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 08:53 PM

i have a collection of pitchers running all around the kitchen cabinet tops. they range from a tall bill van gilder to a short cream pitcher from someone in north carolina. they also make the kitchen look like part of the room since the ceiling rises at the same slope as the pitchers. some are even mine.

the real collection of pots is on shelves in the living room, and the bedroom, and the dining room, and the other bedrooms and the studio and..............

the collection of Windy Meadows houses is currently all over the place.
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#6 Pompots

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 02:00 AM

I collect besides pottery from my fellow potters, Currency from the different countries I have visited, bills and coins. Also I have a small collection of Huichol art from Mexico, and looking forward on making bigger my collection of Mata Ortiz Pottery too.

#7 Paula Patton

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 10:17 AM

I collect percolator tops! No particular reason why, I love that they are small, glass and there are so many different designs. They were made in an era when people held on to things, instead of throwing them out. They are easy to display and are a great conversation pieces! I also have several percolators, so it's fun to pick out your top for that day, and enjoy a wonderful cup of fresh brew out of your favorite mug!

#8 Diane Puckett

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 06:22 PM

Local art, mostly pottery, preferably things made by people I know. And plants for the garden. We consistently go to art shows and plant sales saying we will not buy anything. Whatever.

We appreciate living in a community of artists, gardeners, and small local farms. If we want it to continue, we must $upport it.
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#9 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 09:36 AM

I collect small art vases, up to 5" in height, from all over the world.

As a child I once saw the Vases collection of King Ludwig II of Bavaria and immediately wanted to start my own collection....

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#10 Denice

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 10:31 AM

I guess I'm more of a collector than I thought, I exchange or buy other potters mug, that way I can have a small example of their work. I also buy ethnic pottery at estate sales, they gives me inspiration, someday I want to start a antique button collection, the quality of them and the detailed work is amazing. Denice

#11 ladyinclay

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 05:30 PM

I collect pottery books--if it has to do with pottery in any way I have it--1,000 plus and counting. I started this collection when I had small children and felt I couldn't display pottery because it might get broken, then it was because my house was too small to display pottery, then because I didn't have adequate display space for pottery. Meanwhile, my book collection fills an entire wall with floor to ceiling book shelves--I'm hooked.

#12 Claypple

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 12:08 AM

... I like to collect small objects I pick up while walking.


What is one man's hoarding is another man's collection.

#13 snaegele

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 02:21 PM

I’d like to put my comment here, I am not a potter. Every meal we eat in my house is served on hand made pottery which may range from having been purchased in a seconds bin to something very expensive. For me, pottery, like textiles, is a basic and necessary tool of human history which enabled humans to survive. Every time I eat from pottery I am reminded of this and I feel in touch with people through history. Its not just eating from but washing the dishes, handling each one, getting to know it, that is special.

Owning pottery is like a zen experience—You can use it, enjoy it, break it, and when you are not attached to it you buy another one. Or you can put it away so it does not get broken, do not use it and save it for investment and miss the experience.

Specifically I like shuki (sake utensils) and matcha, and while some of these pieces can be expensive, I still use them.

And sometimes, especially since I moved to a home office, when I want a little creative input ( I am a graphic designer) I walk out, pick up a chawan or tokkuri and spend 5-10 minutes just exploring it with my hands.

Even though I have an art education, have spent time in museums, I cannot even understand the concept of “non functional pottery.” The reality of everyday I eat from a piece of art, everyday I have an important human experience with a plate or a cup or a bowl, is far above any value of some piece of clay sitting in a corner of a museum somewhere being acclaimed by some curator as an “important piece of Art.” For me the Art of pottery is only to be found in the experience of using it.

#14 trina

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 08:37 AM

I’d like to put my comment here, I am not a potter. Every meal we eat in my house is served on hand made pottery which may range from having been purchased in a seconds bin to something very expensive. For me, pottery, like textiles, is a basic and necessary tool of human history which enabled humans to survive. Every time I eat from pottery I am reminded of this and I feel in touch with people through history. Its not just eating from but washing the dishes, handling each one, getting to know it, that is special.

Owning pottery is like a zen experience—You can use it, enjoy it, break it, and when you are not attached to it you buy another one. Or you can put it away so it does not get broken, do not use it and save it for investment and miss the experience.

Specifically I like shuki (sake utensils) and matcha, and while some of these pieces can be expensive, I still use them.

And sometimes, especially since I moved to a home office, when I want a little creative input ( I am a graphic designer) I walk out, pick up a chawan or tokkuri and spend 5-10 minutes just exploring it with my hands.

Even though I have an art education, have spent time in museums, I cannot even understand the concept of “non functional pottery.” The reality of everyday I eat from a piece of art, everyday I have an important human experience with a plate or a cup or a bowl, is far above any value of some piece of clay sitting in a corner of a museum somewhere being acclaimed by some curator as an “important piece of Art.” For me the Art of pottery is only to be found in the experience of using it.




I cannot even understand the concept of “non functional pottery



That makes me feel really sad for you. :( T

#15 Claypple

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 11:02 PM

I’d like to put my comment here, I am not a potter. .............


Hi! Thank you for your nice post.
What brought you to the potters' forum?

#16 trina

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 07:18 AM

oh man and i was so clinging to that one positive rating point.....T

#17 Mark C.

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 03:02 PM

I seem to collect dust-it shows up in the house and on the cars


Really I like to drink out of other potters mugs so I collect them
I have a few tons of shipwreck brass-from portholes to propellers-alot I dove for some i bought.
Mark




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#18 Biglou13

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 08:25 PM


I’d like to put my comment here, I am not a potter. .............


Hi! Thank you for your nice post.
What brought you to the potters' forum?


In case he doesn't. Answer .....

..... A pottery fan, and collector

And in this case quite and educated and accomplished collector.

http://www.naegelede...ery/chawan.html

I found his site before I started coming here, and have leaned a great deal from it.
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#19 Claypple

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 11:40 PM

http://www.naegelede...ery/chawan.html



Interesting that he separated some designs into what he calls "American Bowls".

#20 trina

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 03:52 AM

I had a look at his site. Interesting....

I believe that nonfunctional pottery really has no place except if its part of a commercial art, i.e. design situation where the non-functional pottery is used by the designer because it best communicates the strategic message of the client or its soley a Fine Art statement. However a Fine Art a statement is far below funcitonal and its usually just another piece of junk we do not need in out society.

yip, I agree there is lots of junk we do not need in our society.

It still makes me sad

T




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