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Schools out, kids at home-In the Studio?


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#1 Pres

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 12:20 PM

As an educator for many years, I had that break of 2-3 months to recharge. At the same time though, if I was in the shop, at times I would have my children as companions. They ended up not being too interested in clay, but for a while they were there. Now that school is out my grand daughter is in the shop with me wanting to ""play in the clay". I have started running some lessons in handbuilding appropriate for her age, slab, pinch, etc. Later on I'm sure she will want to get on my wheel also. How do you handle the return of the children on a regular basis during the summer, and their desire to play in the clay?

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#2 neilestrick

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 01:12 PM

Have them wedge for the first 12 years, then send them off to college.Posted Image
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#3 Mark C.

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 03:01 PM

I usually just BBQ them-like this one that came back aboard last Sunday
Another way to deal with pesky ones is toss them back over the side.
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#4 Benzine

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 05:28 PM

Have them wedge for the first 12 years, then send them off to college.Posted Image


So it's like an apprenticeship, that never evolves.

Anyway, last summer, when I was working in the studio, I did so when my daughter was napping, or once my wife was home to watch her. I did however have my niece, who is older, come over, and was interested in the clay sculpture I was working on. So I let her make a small one as well. I went over scoring and slipping, which she basically disregarded, but the piece stayed together regardless, because the clay was wet enough.

Now however, my daughter is a year older, and more into art. She likes drawing, and she has an easel, in my studio, where she can do so. I've only fired up my wheel once, thus far, but she was interested in it, and successfully flopped the cylinder I started. Once I get my studio set up better, I'll let her "play with clay" a bit more.....My wife probably won't be happy with all the "clayed up" clothes, that are to come.
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#5 Denice

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 08:21 AM

Most young children have a short attention span so you will probably won't have her for more than a hour at a time. She will probably like wearing a light weight dust mast and gloves, what projects you make depends on how old she is. My son I started him with snakes around 3 and then dinosaurs at 5, I got a 4X4 piece of plywood and made a dinosaurs island with a volcano in the middle, this took quite of while to finish. When he was eight we made rock fossils, pressed out the clay into a slab and scratched the fossil design in it and then use oxides to color and age it. A little girl might want to make pendant and charms or maybe a tea set, I was a tomboy dinosaurs would have been my choice. I taught my son some throwing when he was 14 but them he lost interest in it, he was playing in a band. Denice

#6 Benzine

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 08:28 AM

Most young children have a short attention span so you will probably won't have her for more than a hour at a time. She will probably like wearing a light weight dust mast and gloves, what projects you make depends on how old she is. My son I started him with snakes around 3 and then dinosaurs at 5, I got a 4X4 piece of plywood and made a dinosaurs island with a volcano in the middle, this took quite of while to finish. When he was eight we made rock fossils, pressed out the clay into a slab and scratched the fossil design in it and then use oxides to color and age it. A little girl might want to make pendant and charms or maybe a tea set, I was a tomboy dinosaurs would have been my choice. I taught my son some throwing when he was 14 but them he lost interest in it, he was playing in a band. Denice


Nice, I'll try some of those suggestions.

Playing in a band?!!! Why can't people realize, how much better the visual arts are, rather than the performing arts?!!!......I joke, but I do constantly tell my students, who are also in band and/ or choir that, just to mess with them......I also tell the band and choir instructors that as well.

What's funny is, I got to college, and I swear, I was one of the few in the Art Department, that wasn't in a band or at least play and instrument.
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#7 Denice

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 09:45 AM

I also was one of those art students who didn't play an instrument, sing or act. I have a good excuse, I was 60 percent deaf when I was young and had my hearing fixed but it seems to be out of tune, I can't even play the radio. We started our son in organ lessons when he was 5 they said it was good for math skills. It turned out he was very talented, had perfect pitch and could play any song he heard. He lost interest in it and is a chef, if I had that talent I would play everyday. Denice

#8 Pres

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 10:45 AM

Most young children have a short attention span so you will probably won't have her for more than a hour at a time. She will probably like wearing a light weight dust mast and gloves, what projects you make depends on how old she is. My son I started him with snakes around 3 and then dinosaurs at 5, I got a 4X4 piece of plywood and made a dinosaurs island with a volcano in the middle, this took quite of while to finish. When he was eight we made rock fossils, pressed out the clay into a slab and scratched the fossil design in it and then use oxides to color and age it. A little girl might want to make pendant and charms or maybe a tea set, I was a tomboy dinosaurs would have been my choice. I taught my son some throwing when he was 14 but them he lost interest in it, he was playing in a band. Denice


My grand daughter is 11. We started with pinch pot w footring, then a box with cut lid, and the last few days we have done a serving platter, and a soap dish/tray. I think next we will do a little puzzle work with cut slabs and multi angles-sculptural. She has a good attention span, and 1 1/2 hrs is not too long for her, but about the limit.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#9 Benzine

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 11:19 AM


Most young children have a short attention span so you will probably won't have her for more than a hour at a time. She will probably like wearing a light weight dust mast and gloves, what projects you make depends on how old she is. My son I started him with snakes around 3 and then dinosaurs at 5, I got a 4X4 piece of plywood and made a dinosaurs island with a volcano in the middle, this took quite of while to finish. When he was eight we made rock fossils, pressed out the clay into a slab and scratched the fossil design in it and then use oxides to color and age it. A little girl might want to make pendant and charms or maybe a tea set, I was a tomboy dinosaurs would have been my choice. I taught my son some throwing when he was 14 but them he lost interest in it, he was playing in a band. Denice


My grand daughter is 11. We started with pinch pot w footring, then a box with cut lid, and the last few days we have done a serving platter, and a soap dish/tray. I think next we will do a little puzzle work with cut slabs and multi angles-sculptural. She has a good attention span, and 1 1/2 hrs is not too long for her, but about the limit.


That's awesome Pres. I wish all my students had such a background, when they got to me. I'd be able to go over more advanced projects.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"




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