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#21 Benzine

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 12:16 PM

I've never tried this, but my high school art teacher told me a story about how he, or those he knew used urine on their ceramic items. I don't recall the specifics, but I want to say, that they urinated directly on the hot wares, which makes me think, it was part of a "Raku-Like" process, as I imagine that urinating into a hot kiln, is both difficult and ill-advised. I don't know how factual the story is, as my high school teacher had many a story. They were very entertaining anyway.
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#22 Bob Coyle

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 06:22 PM



I also harvested both of the layers above and below the K/T layer as well as he layer itself. I glazed the mugs so that they had all three layers as they appeared in the geological formation.


What a great idea. I love it.

Jim


That is indeed awesome.

You don't have any pictures of the mugs do you?


I tried to keep it as close to the real thing so they don't look like much, but I'll take a picture and upload it along with a picture of the K/T formation I dug the clay from

I only dug out a few ounces of each, because the exposure is not very big. Even so I felt a little guilty... kind of like picking up a small piece of petrified wood at Petrified Forest National Monument.

#23 Benzine

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 06:32 PM




I also harvested both of the layers above and below the K/T layer as well as he layer itself. I glazed the mugs so that they had all three layers as they appeared in the geological formation.


What a great idea. I love it.

Jim


That is indeed awesome.

You don't have any pictures of the mugs do you?


I tried to keep it as close to the real thing so they don't look like much, but I'll take a picture and upload it along with a picture of the K/T formation I dug the clay from

I only dug out a few ounces of each, because the exposure is not very big. Even so I felt a little guilty... kind of like picking up a small piece of petrified wood at Petrified Forest National Monument.


My brother found a fantastic, somewhat rare, arrowhead in The Badlands, South Dakota. He debated, whether or not to take it.
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#24 Claypple

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 07:02 PM

I've never tried this, but my high school art teacher told me a story about how he, or those he knew used urine on their ceramic items. I don't recall the specifics, but I want to say, that they urinated directly on the hot wares, which makes me think, it was part of a "Raku-Like" process, as I imagine that urinating into a hot kiln, is both difficult and ill-advised. I don't know how factual the story is, as my high school teacher had many a story. They were very entertaining anyway.


Maybe this is what he meant?

The old story when i was a kid
was that the japanese master potters would pee
in their clay...to fertilize it before storage. it would make
the clay grow during ageing.

kids loved that story...and would talk about doing it
in the old clay buckets at school...so i mixed a big jug
of a mixture of ammonia and vinegar/ sorta a pee
substitute....and you know.........i think it works...i still
use it all the time....35 years and i still fertilize my
stored, recycled clay...



Well, have to realize that the ammonia and vinegar do not substitute the urine. Urine does have some ammonia, though. I can imagine the smell of his studio, too.

#25 Benzine

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 09:29 PM


I've never tried this, but my high school art teacher told me a story about how he, or those he knew used urine on their ceramic items. I don't recall the specifics, but I want to say, that they urinated directly on the hot wares, which makes me think, it was part of a "Raku-Like" process, as I imagine that urinating into a hot kiln, is both difficult and ill-advised. I don't know how factual the story is, as my high school teacher had many a story. They were very entertaining anyway.


Maybe this is what he meant?

The old story when i was a kid
was that the japanese master potters would pee
in their clay...to fertilize it before storage. it would make
the clay grow during ageing.

kids loved that story...and would talk about doing it
in the old clay buckets at school...so i mixed a big jug
of a mixture of ammonia and vinegar/ sorta a pee
substitute....and you know.........i think it works...i still
use it all the time....35 years and i still fertilize my
stored, recycled clay...



Well, have to realize that the ammonia and vinegar do not substitute the urine. Urine does have some ammonia, though. I can imagine the smell of his studio, too.



Hmmm, he may have meant that, but I swear he said "Pots", not just "clay".
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#26 Bob Coyle

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 01:16 PM



I also harvested both of the layers above and below the K/T layer as well as he layer itself. I glazed the mugs so that they had all three layers as they appeared in the geological formation.


What a great idea. I love it.

Jim


That is indeed awesome.

You don't have any pictures of the mugs do you?


I attached an image of the mug and also the formation I dug the clay from. The thin whiten layer in the center is the debris left from the meteor impact. Not much to dig from but then I only made about a dozen mugs. The mug does look a little rough, like the formation. I was tempted to cute it up a little, but decided to leave it alone.

The geologists though it was great. One of them wanted me to start production, or at least make a dozen more for everyone in his department, but I declined.

#27 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 01:38 PM

I shoveled a pick load of Volcanic Ash on the Couer d' Lane Indian reservation (with permission) back in 1980.
Used it for years at the University. I still have some and I gave a lot away when I moved to Texas.
When I was a caretaker at a religious estate in Upstate new York, the fireplace ash trap in the basement was full of cherry wood ash. A 50-50 mix with Albany slip, gave a beautiful gold sparkly glaze at ^ 10..

Marcia

#28 jrgpots

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 04:35 PM

I shoveled a pick load of Volcanic Ash on the Couer d' Lane Indian reservation (with permission) back in 1980.
Used it for years at the University. I still have some and I gave a lot away when I moved to Texas.
When I was a caretaker at a religious estate in Upstate new York, the fireplace ash trap in the basement was full of cherry wood ash. A 50-50 mix with Albany slip, gave a beautiful gold sparkly glaze at ^ 10..

Marcia



Now that gold sparky glaze sounds cool. What type of effects did you get with the volcanic ash?

Jed

#29 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 04:41 PM

I had a nice black with small gold crystals at ^10. But in 1980 I stopped firing to ^10 at school and lowered the temperatures to ^6. I fired ^10 in my oil kiln with Volcanic ash at home.

Marcia

#30 OffCenter

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 05:07 PM




I also harvested both of the layers above and below the K/T layer as well as he layer itself. I glazed the mugs so that they had all three layers as they appeared in the geological formation.


What a great idea. I love it.

Jim


That is indeed awesome.

You don't have any pictures of the mugs do you?


I attached an image of the mug and also the formation I dug the clay from. The thin whiten layer in the center is the debris left from the meteor impact. Not much to dig from but then I only made about a dozen mugs. The mug does look a little rough, like the formation. I was tempted to cute it up a little, but decided to leave it alone.

The geologists though it was great. One of them wanted me to start production, or at least make a dozen more for everyone in his department, but I declined.


I never realized the K-T layer was so much lighter than the layers under and above it. Obviously, the small amount of iridium there wouldn't cause this, what did?

BTW, the mug is cool.

Jim
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#31 Benzine

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 05:39 PM

Thanks for posting the pictures. That inner blue color, compliments the outer colors nicely.
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#32 Claypple

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 08:47 PM

Bob, the mug and especially the idea are really cool. How did you make it?
Did you make a slab first and then threw it on the wheel? Or were you throwing it in segments, one clay at a time?

#33 Bob Coyle

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 10:17 PM

Bob, the mug and especially the idea are really cool. How did you make it?
Did you make a slab first and then threw it on the wheel? Or were you throwing it in segments, one clay at a time?


The mugs were thrown from just old Laguna MR-5 clay. Only the glaze contained the clays from the K/T. I thought of making the whole thing out of the different clays, but I didn't want to dig out that much of the exposed formation.

The actual layer is lighter because of the tremendous disruption of the planets surface during the impact. Millions of tons of mixed debris fell to earth in a short time and resulted in a layer that was less rich in iron than the underlying layer. The color is not due to iridium. There is really not that much of this element in the layer, although the overall amount is much greater than that normally found on earth.

Remember, even though the layer is thin, it still represents some hundreds or maybe even thousands of years of sediment formation. When the last of the debris from the asteroid strike washed away, then the layer above it took on a darker shade again.

I several place the K/T layer is sandwiched between two coal layers. which don't make very good glazes.




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