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Bob Coyle    113

I also harvested both of the layers above and below the K/T layer as well as he layer itself. I glazed the mugs so that they had all three layers as they appeared in the geological formation.

 

 

What a great idea. I love it.

 

Jim

 

 

That is indeed awesome.

 

You don't have any pictures of the mugs do you?

 

 

I attached an image of the mug and also the formation I dug the clay from. The thin whiten layer in the center is the debris left from the meteor impact. Not much to dig from but then I only made about a dozen mugs. The mug does look a little rough, like the formation. I was tempted to cute it up a little, but decided to leave it alone.

 

The geologists though it was great. One of them wanted me to start production, or at least make a dozen more for everyone in his department, but I declined.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I shoveled a pick load of Volcanic Ash on the Couer d' Lane Indian reservation (with permission) back in 1980.

Used it for years at the University. I still have some and I gave a lot away when I moved to Texas.

When I was a caretaker at a religious estate in Upstate new York, the fireplace ash trap in the basement was full of cherry wood ash. A 50-50 mix with Albany slip, gave a beautiful gold sparkly glaze at ^ 10..

 

Marcia

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jrgpots    231

I shoveled a pick load of Volcanic Ash on the Couer d' Lane Indian reservation (with permission) back in 1980.

Used it for years at the University. I still have some and I gave a lot away when I moved to Texas.

When I was a caretaker at a religious estate in Upstate new York, the fireplace ash trap in the basement was full of cherry wood ash. A 50-50 mix with Albany slip, gave a beautiful gold sparkly glaze at ^ 10..

 

Marcia

 

 

 

Now that gold sparky glaze sounds cool. What type of effects did you get with the volcanic ash?

 

Jed

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I had a nice black with small gold crystals at ^10. But in 1980 I stopped firing to ^10 at school and lowered the temperatures to ^6. I fired ^10 in my oil kiln with Volcanic ash at home.

 

Marcia

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OffCenter    82

I also harvested both of the layers above and below the K/T layer as well as he layer itself. I glazed the mugs so that they had all three layers as they appeared in the geological formation.

 

 

What a great idea. I love it.

 

Jim

 

 

That is indeed awesome.

 

You don't have any pictures of the mugs do you?

 

 

I attached an image of the mug and also the formation I dug the clay from. The thin whiten layer in the center is the debris left from the meteor impact. Not much to dig from but then I only made about a dozen mugs. The mug does look a little rough, like the formation. I was tempted to cute it up a little, but decided to leave it alone.

 

The geologists though it was great. One of them wanted me to start production, or at least make a dozen more for everyone in his department, but I declined.

 

 

I never realized the K-T layer was so much lighter than the layers under and above it. Obviously, the small amount of iridium there wouldn't cause this, what did?

 

BTW, the mug is cool.

 

Jim

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Claypple    29

Bob, the mug and especially the idea are really cool. How did you make it?

Did you make a slab first and then threw it on the wheel? Or were you throwing it in segments, one clay at a time?

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Bob Coyle    113

Bob, the mug and especially the idea are really cool. How did you make it?

Did you make a slab first and then threw it on the wheel? Or were you throwing it in segments, one clay at a time?

 

The mugs were thrown from just old Laguna MR-5 clay. Only the glaze contained the clays from the K/T. I thought of making the whole thing out of the different clays, but I didn't want to dig out that much of the exposed formation.

 

The actual layer is lighter because of the tremendous disruption of the planets surface during the impact. Millions of tons of mixed debris fell to earth in a short time and resulted in a layer that was less rich in iron than the underlying layer. The color is not due to iridium. There is really not that much of this element in the layer, although the overall amount is much greater than that normally found on earth.

 

Remember, even though the layer is thin, it still represents some hundreds or maybe even thousands of years of sediment formation. When the last of the debris from the asteroid strike washed away, then the layer above it took on a darker shade again.

 

I several place the K/T layer is sandwiched between two coal layers. which don't make very good glazes.

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