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Lots of Glaze


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#1 Dawn~

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 10:41 PM

Hello, I purchased a ceramic home studio and I have a lot of great non toxic glazed that we can use and we also have a lot of lead based glazes and I would like to know if these are still usable, I also need to know if I put them on craigslist that I wouldn't be breaking any laws.. anyone can offer suggestions? I appreciate your help..

#2 justanassembler

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 10:54 PM

Hello, I purchased a ceramic home studio and I have a lot of great non toxic glazed that we can use and we also have a lot of lead based glazes and I would like to know if these are still usable, I also need to know if I put them on craigslist that I wouldn't be breaking any laws.. anyone can offer suggestions? I appreciate your help..


check and see if your municipality has a household hazardous materials drop off. Bring them there. Firing them in your kiln contaminates it (actually, if you inherited it with the rest of the stuff, it may be already--maybe test it...). Its really your call, Im sure there are people here or otherwise who would tell you not to worry, but lead is one thing I just try to avoid altogether.

#3 Denice

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 08:19 AM

I know I'm a rebel saying this but I would use them on non functional work. Lead glazes in general are beautiful glazes, the government banned them because people were getting lead poisoning from eating off of dishes that had a lead based glaze. As I remember it most of the dishes were bought or made outside of the US, it's a pity the government couldn't find a better way to control the situation. Wear a dust mask and gloves while working with it and you'll be fine. Denice

#4 JBaymore

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 08:49 AM

If you plan to use them....... research the safe handling of lead based materials so that you KNOW how to work as safely as possible with them.

The biggest hazard from lead bearing glazes is to the potters... not the users.

If you are using a small amount of them the level of hazard is smaller than if you are using them day in and day out in large volumes.

It is all about accurate education. Once you know... you can make informed decisions.

best,

...............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#5 Dawn~

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 10:25 PM

Hello, I purchased a ceramic home studio and I have a lot of great non toxic glazed that we can use and we also have a lot of lead based glazes and I would like to know if these are still usable, I also need to know if I put them on craigslist that I wouldn't be breaking any laws.. anyone can offer suggestions? I appreciate your help..


Thanks or all the great advice, can I sell or give these away legally ? Since they are no longer avail to buy I want to be sure of the legalities.

#6 JBaymore

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 10:15 AM

Yes, you can.

However that being said......... there MIGHT be some "contingent liability" becasue the stuff COULD be dangerous to the person that you give it to or that buys it if they ever wanted to go after you for some harm that the stuiff did and they can claim that you did not warn them sufficinetly. Not sure on that though. That kind of crap is the province of lawyers Posted Image. (Maybe Lawpots will chime in here?)

Likely that risk, .........if there actually IS one......, is tiny. In most such stuff people are looking for "deep pockets" to go after.

Maybe articulate the presence of lead (and other hazardous content) in writing and have the person who gets it sign and date it. That way you have some documentation of the "warning"?


best,

................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com




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