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Is this a Sugar Creek spray booth? Drainage ideas wanted.


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#1 MichaelP

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 06:15 PM

I've got a booth that I suspect was made by Sugar Creek (see photos below). Sugar Creek is out of business. If you think it was made by a different manufacturer, I'd be happy to find out its name.

The opening of the booth is 40" wide x 29 1/2" high. There is a fan installed in a 12" dia. exhaust. The booth uses regular furnace filters (removed before taking photos).

If this is what you have, does the paperwork mention the fan rating (CFM)? Also I wonder what the manufacturer has suggested in terms of drainage. What was YOUR approach to it, and how do you like the result?

As you can see, the bottom is flat. I have a few ideas ranging from using old newspapers to collect the moisture to drilling a hole in a back corner and slightly tilting the booth so that water flows toward the drain. A properly shaped secondary floor with a drain is something else that comes to my mind. Rails directing water toward a drain location is yet another idea (the easiest would be to have it drained over the front edge, but it sounds almost as ugly of a design as using newspapers).

Any ideas are welcome.

Thank you.

Mike

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#2 oldlady

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 08:44 AM

i am confused.

are you planning to convert this item to a spray booth that has circulating water to remove the overspray?

are you thinking that if you use it as is that the overspray is so wet and heavy that it will remain liquid and need draining away?

in my experience overspray dries so quickly that you will not need to do anything but wipe the walls and floor with a damp sponge after an hours long session of glazing.
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#3 MichaelP

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 09:40 AM

I'm just thinking about spraying water at the end of each session to clean the gun and the booth.

#4 Pres

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 06:54 PM

I'm just thinking about spraying water at the end of each session to clean the gun and the booth.


Maybe all you need do then is put a drain bottom in, and attach it to some sort of homemade sediment trap. I use a 5 gal. bucket with a drain hose about 12-18 inches from the top and a cover to keep mice/mosquitoes from gathering. Clear hose goes to the drain to allow me to see when clogged. I don't have a spray booth, but use this for sink trap. I am thinking of building a water fall spray booth soon.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#5 MichaelP

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 09:24 PM

The problem is in the flat bottom. Water will not collect at the drain hole unless I do something about it.

#6 oldlady

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 11:01 PM

The problem is in the flat bottom. Water will not collect at the drain hole unless I do something about it.





if you have not yet tried out the spray booth as it is why don't you do so. then wipe it out with a damp sponge. really, it will not be hard to use that way. what kind of a spraygun do you have? why are you not planning to wash it out into a sink? is spraying totally new to you?
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#7 MichaelP

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 02:40 PM

if you have not yet tried out the spray booth as it is why don't you do so. then wipe it out with a damp sponge. really, it will not be hard to use that way. what kind of a spraygun do you have? why are you not planning to wash it out into a sink? is spraying totally new to you?

I used a spray booth in a community studio (college) where we needed to leave it clean after use. Clearing the gun (I have a HVLP one) is not a problem, of course. But I was thinking about spraying the booth walls and the floor with water to keep them clean. The reason I inquire about it is that I'm installing the booth and exhaust ducts now. Making any changes to the design will be much easier now before the installation is over.

Do you want to imply that many commercial booths don't have any drainage system at all?

P.S. I've got a reply from a former owner of the same booth, Linda Blossom. She confirms that this is, indeed, a Sugar Creek booth. Sounds like the exhaust is 700 CFM (I've seen a note on the Net stating that Sugar Creek produced two booth models: a smaller one with 400CFM and a larger, 700 CFM one).




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