Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
snowluck2345

Homemade Griffin Grip

Recommended Posts

I was just now looking at the griffin grips and would it be very difficult to make your own? It looks just like a few spirals, a top plate with some slots in it, and grabbers that slip into the bottom plate? Like I know I would have to think carefully about how they will attach, but I don't think it would be too hard to make?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just now looking at the griffin grips and would it be very difficult to make your own? It looks just like a few spirals, a top plate with some slots in it, and grabbers that slip into the bottom plate? Like I know I would have to think carefully about how they will attach, but I don't think it would be too hard to make?

 

 

its a design that is basically a three jaw scroll chuck. If you have machine tools and a machinist background, its not super complicated... However, if you lack those two things, probably its cheaper for you to shell out the 200 bucks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OffCenter    82

I was just now looking at the griffin grips and would it be very difficult to make your own? It looks just like a few spirals, a top plate with some slots in it, and grabbers that slip into the bottom plate? Like I know I would have to think carefully about how they will attach, but I don't think it would be too hard to make?

 

 

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

I was just now looking at the griffin grips and would it be very difficult to make your own? It looks just like a few spirals, a top plate with some slots in it, and grabbers that slip into the bottom plate? Like I know I would have to think carefully about how they will attach, but I don't think it would be too hard to make?

 

 

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

 

 

There have been a few posts on here, about building your own magnetic holder system, for trimming. I forget what they said the total cost was, but it wasn't much. Far cheaper than a Giffin Grip. With that said, I still like the one I bought for my classroom, and have no regrets about buying. Plus it was on sale, for about $130 or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just now looking at the griffin grips and would it be very difficult to make your own? It looks just like a few spirals, a top plate with some slots in it, and grabbers that slip into the bottom plate? Like I know I would have to think carefully about how they will attach, but I don't think it would be too hard to make?

 

 

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

 

 

There have been a few posts on here, about building your own magnetic holder system, for trimming. I forget what they said the total cost was, but it wasn't much. Far cheaper than a Giffin Grip. With that said, I still like the one I bought for my classroom, and have no regrets about buying. Plus it was on sale, for about $130 or so.

 

 

 

 

You have no regrets about buying a giffin grip or magnetic trimming system?

 

I have access to a machine shop and I was planning on cnc milling the plates out of some 1/2" acrylic plate I was given.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

I was just now looking at the griffin grips and would it be very difficult to make your own? It looks just like a few spirals, a top plate with some slots in it, and grabbers that slip into the bottom plate? Like I know I would have to think carefully about how they will attach, but I don't think it would be too hard to make?

 

 

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

 

 

There have been a few posts on here, about building your own magnetic holder system, for trimming. I forget what they said the total cost was, but it wasn't much. Far cheaper than a Giffin Grip. With that said, I still like the one I bought for my classroom, and have no regrets about buying. Plus it was on sale, for about $130 or so.

 

 

 

 

You have no regrets about buying a giffin grip or magnetic trimming system?

 

I have access to a machine shop and I was planning on cnc milling the plates out of some 1/2" acrylic plate I was given.

 

 

Sorry, should have clarified. I have no regrets with buying a Giffin Grip. I don't use it to replace the use of tap centering, for trimming, but as a supplement to it. If I'm trimming a lot at one time, I'll use it, and I have the students use it, because of time and equipment constraints. I still teach them, how to tap center though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kohaku    22

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

 

 

So- as someone who's largely self taught, and who uses a Giffin grip...

 

I have always thought that the point of the Giffin was not so much to center a piece, as to hold it in place. In the few ceramics classes I took, I was taught to use clay pieces (three, evenly spaced) to keep the work from flying off the wheel. This tends to waste clay though... and I've still had a nice piece or two fly off the wheel. This never happens with the Giffin. I can tap center just fine... but I like the security I get with the Giff.

 

Is there some trimming technique I'm missing here that I should add to my arsenal? (Yes- I do use chucks for a number of things... but my space is limited, and I can't have a chuck on hand for everything...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Denice    243

I haven't put together my magnetic grippers yet but I have purchased every thing for them and spent under 20 dollars. John255 posted Feb 2013 directions and pictures on how to make these. It seems like a really simple project, I haven't assembled mine yet because I am finishing other projects first. I'm hoping to get around to them this weekend. Denice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OffCenter    82

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

 

 

So- as someone who's largely self taught, and who uses a Giffin grip...

 

I have always thought that the point of the Giffin was not so much to center a piece, as to hold it in place. In the few ceramics classes I took, I was taught to use clay pieces (three, evenly spaced) to keep the work from flying off the wheel. This tends to waste clay though... and I've still had a nice piece or two fly off the wheel. This never happens with the Giffin. I can tap center just fine... but I like the security I get with the Giff.

 

Is there some trimming technique I'm missing here that I should add to my arsenal? (Yes- I do use chucks for a number of things... but my space is limited, and I can't have a chuck on hand for everything...)

 

 

If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it. I bought one and after giving it a fair try concluded there is nothing I could do with it that I couldn't do faster and/or better by tapping on center or using a chuck or using a hump. To reply to you concerns: I don't know why clay you use to hold a pot on the wheel is wasted. I just re-wedge mine and I never have a piece "fly off the wheel". I don't have a single chuck in my studio. When I need a chuck, I take the time it would take to clean the wheel head and attach a Griffin Grip to throw a quick chuck that is perfect for the pot to be trimmed and cover it with plastic wrap. Same with hump. I hardly ever trim and when I do, it is often an altered shape that wouldn't fit a Griffin Grip. But even if I were just producing tons of simple little symmetrical bowls, I could do it much quicker and better by tapping on center.

 

Now, can we talk about your spash pan?

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

 

 

So- as someone who's largely self taught, and who uses a Giffin grip...

 

I have always thought that the point of the Giffin was not so much to center a piece, as to hold it in place. In the few ceramics classes I took, I was taught to use clay pieces (three, evenly spaced) to keep the work from flying off the wheel. This tends to waste clay though... and I've still had a nice piece or two fly off the wheel. This never happens with the Giffin. I can tap center just fine... but I like the security I get with the Giff.

 

Is there some trimming technique I'm missing here that I should add to my arsenal? (Yes- I do use chucks for a number of things... but my space is limited, and I can't have a chuck on hand for everything...)

 

 

If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it. I bought one and after giving it a fair try concluded there is nothing I could do with it that I couldn't do faster and/or better by tapping on center or using a chuck or using a hump. To reply to you concerns: I don't know why clay you use to hold a pot on the wheel is wasted. I just re-wedge mine and I never have a piece "fly off the wheel". I don't have a single chuck in my studio. When I need a chuck, I take the time it would take to clean the wheel head and attach a Griffin Grip to throw a quick chuck that is perfect for the pot to be trimmed and cover it with plastic wrap. Same with hump. I hardly ever trim and when I do, it is often an altered shape that wouldn't fit a Griffin Grip. But even if I were just producing tons of simple little symmetrical bowls, I could do it much quicker and better by tapping on center.

 

Now, can we talk about your spash pan?

 

Jim

 

 

Come now Jim, I do believe you were reconsidering a splash pan, as a means to gather some slop for pugging.......

 

Did I read your post right? Did you say you hardly ever trim?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OffCenter    82

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

 

 

So- as someone who's largely self taught, and who uses a Giffin grip...

 

I have always thought that the point of the Giffin was not so much to center a piece, as to hold it in place. In the few ceramics classes I took, I was taught to use clay pieces (three, evenly spaced) to keep the work from flying off the wheel. This tends to waste clay though... and I've still had a nice piece or two fly off the wheel. This never happens with the Giffin. I can tap center just fine... but I like the security I get with the Giff.

 

Is there some trimming technique I'm missing here that I should add to my arsenal? (Yes- I do use chucks for a number of things... but my space is limited, and I can't have a chuck on hand for everything...)

 

 

If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it. I bought one and after giving it a fair try concluded there is nothing I could do with it that I couldn't do faster and/or better by tapping on center or using a chuck or using a hump. To reply to you concerns: I don't know why clay you use to hold a pot on the wheel is wasted. I just re-wedge mine and I never have a piece "fly off the wheel". I don't have a single chuck in my studio. When I need a chuck, I take the time it would take to clean the wheel head and attach a Griffin Grip to throw a quick chuck that is perfect for the pot to be trimmed and cover it with plastic wrap. Same with hump. I hardly ever trim and when I do, it is often an altered shape that wouldn't fit a Griffin Grip. But even if I were just producing tons of simple little symmetrical bowls, I could do it much quicker and better by tapping on center.

 

Now, can we talk about your spash pan?

 

Jim

 

 

Come now Jim, I do believe you were reconsidering a splash pan, as a means to gather some slop for pugging.......

 

Did I read your post right? Did you say you hardly ever trim?

 

 

Reconsidering a splash pan was a scary moment for me but, fortunately, it lasted only a moment. I can collect better slop off the sponge that serves as my splash pan.

 

Yes, I hardly ever trim. I still trim some bowls, but am getting away from that.

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

 

 

So- as someone who's largely self taught, and who uses a Giffin grip...

 

I have always thought that the point of the Giffin was not so much to center a piece, as to hold it in place. In the few ceramics classes I took, I was taught to use clay pieces (three, evenly spaced) to keep the work from flying off the wheel. This tends to waste clay though... and I've still had a nice piece or two fly off the wheel. This never happens with the Giffin. I can tap center just fine... but I like the security I get with the Giff.

 

Is there some trimming technique I'm missing here that I should add to my arsenal? (Yes- I do use chucks for a number of things... but my space is limited, and I can't have a chuck on hand for everything...)

 

 

If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it. I bought one and after giving it a fair try concluded there is nothing I could do with it that I couldn't do faster and/or better by tapping on center or using a chuck or using a hump. To reply to you concerns: I don't know why clay you use to hold a pot on the wheel is wasted. I just re-wedge mine and I never have a piece "fly off the wheel". I don't have a single chuck in my studio. When I need a chuck, I take the time it would take to clean the wheel head and attach a Griffin Grip to throw a quick chuck that is perfect for the pot to be trimmed and cover it with plastic wrap. Same with hump. I hardly ever trim and when I do, it is often an altered shape that wouldn't fit a Griffin Grip. But even if I were just producing tons of simple little symmetrical bowls, I could do it much quicker and better by tapping on center.

 

Now, can we talk about your spash pan?

 

Jim

 

 

Come now Jim, I do believe you were reconsidering a splash pan, as a means to gather some slop for pugging.......

 

Did I read your post right? Did you say you hardly ever trim?

 

 

Reconsidering a splash pan was a scary moment for me but, fortunately, it lasted only a moment. I can collect better slop off the sponge that serves as my splash pan.

 

Yes, I hardly ever trim. I still trim some bowls, but am getting away from that.

 

Jim

 

 

That's good about the splash pan, because like I said, I believe that had you used one, it would trigger the End of Days.

 

So, if you don't trim, you just leave the bottoms flat, or you add feet? I've seen pictures of some of your work, and I guess I just didn't notice, or couldn't tell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OffCenter    82

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

 

 

So- as someone who's largely self taught, and who uses a Giffin grip...

 

I have always thought that the point of the Giffin was not so much to center a piece, as to hold it in place. In the few ceramics classes I took, I was taught to use clay pieces (three, evenly spaced) to keep the work from flying off the wheel. This tends to waste clay though... and I've still had a nice piece or two fly off the wheel. This never happens with the Giffin. I can tap center just fine... but I like the security I get with the Giff.

 

Is there some trimming technique I'm missing here that I should add to my arsenal? (Yes- I do use chucks for a number of things... but my space is limited, and I can't have a chuck on hand for everything...)

 

 

If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it. I bought one and after giving it a fair try concluded there is nothing I could do with it that I couldn't do faster and/or better by tapping on center or using a chuck or using a hump. To reply to you concerns: I don't know why clay you use to hold a pot on the wheel is wasted. I just re-wedge mine and I never have a piece "fly off the wheel". I don't have a single chuck in my studio. When I need a chuck, I take the time it would take to clean the wheel head and attach a Griffin Grip to throw a quick chuck that is perfect for the pot to be trimmed and cover it with plastic wrap. Same with hump. I hardly ever trim and when I do, it is often an altered shape that wouldn't fit a Griffin Grip. But even if I were just producing tons of simple little symmetrical bowls, I could do it much quicker and better by tapping on center.

 

Now, can we talk about your spash pan?

 

Jim

 

 

Come now Jim, I do believe you were reconsidering a splash pan, as a means to gather some slop for pugging.......

 

Did I read your post right? Did you say you hardly ever trim?

 

 

Reconsidering a splash pan was a scary moment for me but, fortunately, it lasted only a moment. I can collect better slop off the sponge that serves as my splash pan.

 

Yes, I hardly ever trim. I still trim some bowls, but am getting away from that.

 

Jim

 

 

That's good about the splash pan, because like I said, I believe that had you used one, it would trigger the End of Days.

 

So, if you don't trim, you just leave the bottoms flat, or you add feet? I've seen pictures of some of your work, and I guess I just didn't notice, or couldn't tell.

 

 

On most forms I work the bottom with a rib to smooth it and make it slightly concave.

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pres    896

 

 




Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

Jim


So- as someone who's largely self taught, and who uses a Giffin grip...

I have always thought that the point of the Giffin was not so much to center a piece, as to hold it in place. In the few ceramics classes I took, I was taught to use clay pieces (three, evenly spaced) to keep the work from flying off the wheel. This tends to waste clay though... and I've still had a nice piece or two fly off the wheel. This never happens with the Giffin. I can tap center just fine... but I like the security I get with the Giff.

Is there some trimming technique I'm missing here that I should add to my arsenal? (Yes- I do use chucks for a number of things... but my space is limited, and I can't have a chuck on hand for everything...)


If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it. I bought one and after giving it a fair try concluded there is nothing I could do with it that I couldn't do faster and/or better by tapping on center or using a chuck or using a hump. To reply to you concerns: I don't know why clay you use to hold a pot on the wheel is wasted. I just re-wedge mine and I never have a piece "fly off the wheel". I don't have a single chuck in my studio. When I need a chuck, I take the time it would take to clean the wheel head and attach a Griffin Grip to throw a quick chuck that is perfect for the pot to be trimmed and cover it with plastic wrap. Same with hump. I hardly ever trim and when I do, it is often an altered shape that wouldn't fit a Griffin Grip. But even if I were just producing tons of simple little symmetrical bowls, I could do it much quicker and better by tapping on center.

Now, can we talk about your spash pan?

Jim


Yes, you may like or dislike the Griffin Grip if purchased. I have found that it is a handy tool, but can do every thing it does in another manner-damp wheel head, clay chocs, thrown chucks-wet or bisque, jar cap on top, and many others. In the long run, I use the griffin on pieces and pots where a thrown chuck leaves a mark either smudgy wet clay, or indent into the piece. It is especially helpful with chucks made from hardware parts for longs

stems of chalices. However, this all just my opinion, and my way of working.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

Just my opinion, mind you, but a Griffin Grip is not worth the time to make or the money to buy. Taping on center is soooo much faster (and a skill every potter should have) and for difficult shapes chucks and humps work so much better and don't cost a penny.

 

Jim

 

So- as someone who's largely self taught, and who uses a Giffin grip...

 

I have always thought that the point of the Giffin was not so much to center a piece, as to hold it in place. In the few ceramics classes I took, I was taught to use clay pieces (three, evenly spaced) to keep the work from flying off the wheel. This tends to waste clay though... and I've still had a nice piece or two fly off the wheel. This never happens with the Giffin. I can tap center just fine... but I like the security I get with the Giff.

 

Is there some trimming technique I'm missing here that I should add to my arsenal? (Yes- I do use chucks for a number of things... but my space is limited, and I can't have a chuck on hand for everything...)

 

If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it. I bought one and after giving it a fair try concluded there is nothing I could do with it that I couldn't do faster and/or better by tapping on center or using a chuck or using a hump. To reply to you concerns: I don't know why clay you use to hold a pot on the wheel is wasted. I just re-wedge mine and I never have a piece "fly off the wheel". I don't have a single chuck in my studio. When I need a chuck, I take the time it would take to clean the wheel head and attach a Griffin Grip to throw a quick chuck that is perfect for the pot to be trimmed and cover it with plastic wrap. Same with hump. I hardly ever trim and when I do, it is often an altered shape that wouldn't fit a Griffin Grip. But even if I were just producing tons of simple little symmetrical bowls, I could do it much quicker and better by tapping on center.

 

Now, can we talk about your spash pan?

 

Jim

 

Come now Jim, I do believe you were reconsidering a splash pan, as a means to gather some slop for pugging.......

 

Did I read your post right? Did you say you hardly ever trim?

 

Reconsidering a splash pan was a scary moment for me but, fortunately, it lasted only a moment. I can collect better slop off the sponge that serves as my splash pan.

 

Yes, I hardly ever trim. I still trim some bowls, but am getting away from that.

 

Jim

 

That's good about the splash pan, because like I said, I believe that had you used one, it would trigger the End of Days.

 

So, if you don't trim, you just leave the bottoms flat, or you add feet? I've seen pictures of some of your work, and I guess I just didn't notice, or couldn't tell.

 

On most forms I work the bottom with a rib to smooth it and make it slightly concave.

 

Jim

 

Nice. What's your rib preference, metal, rubber, or a bone from someone, who has wronged you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark C.    1,807

Its a tool like a screwdriver-it has a place in my studio and it allows me more time for other things. I cannot image machining one for less money/time than buying one on sale.

I actually have three of them now-One to many as I have them set up to fot different items. I got a few buy purchasing other potters out of everything. I am planing on donating one to my favorite

ceramic art center on Moloki Hi .I really like what they are doing for the locals on this Island with a ceramic program.

http://www.molokaiartscenter.com/

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Claypple    29

I hardly ever trim

Jim

 

Some time before you said : "Centering is overrated"; then you admitted you do not use the splash pan, and now you do not trim?

 

Jim, do you eat human's food? Does our air have enough nitrogen for you? Do you find sulfuric acid not spicy enough when you season your clay with it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Claypple    29

Common Jim!

I only asked, because once in a while, I, myself enjoy a cup of freshly brewed magma.

And, just between two of us: who does not like a good sip of Mercury! wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OffCenter    82

Common Jim!

I only asked, because once in a while, I, myself enjoy a cup of freshly brewed magma.

And, just between two of us: who does not like a good sip of Mercury! wink.gif

 

Hitting the bottle a little bit early there, huh, Claypple? (Insert emoticon of your choice here.)

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Claypple    29

Common Jim!

I only asked, because once in a while, I, myself enjoy a cup of freshly brewed magma.

And, just between two of us: who does not like a good sip of Mercury! wink.gif

 

Hitting the bottle a little bit early there, huh, Claypple? (Insert emoticon of your choice here.)

 

Jim

 

I wish! No, I am just naturally screwed. Writing Sci Fiction is my second hobby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
annekat    3

Wow. I have seen these discussions about Giffin Grips on another forum. Some people are dead set against them and think no one should have them. I'm not saying anyone here has said that. In my opinion and observation, the Grip is a tool that is very useful to many potters. Everyone makes different kinds of pots, different shapes, and has varying amounts of trimming to do. If one's goal is to make pots that require as few tools as possible, or to spend as little as possible on tools, that is OK. The Grip is used for a lot more than just centering a pot. It holds the pot on center and can be used in decorating, waxing, sanding, etc. It is not perfect. There are cases where other methods work better than using the Grip. That is life. Not everything works all the time. I have two Giffin Grips, one old and worn out, and the other newer. I use them for different purposes. I find them to save both time and labor. When I have to work on a pot that is not the right shape for the Grip, it takes longer. Everyone is different. To each his or her own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OffCenter    82

Some people are dead set against them and think no one should have them.

 

 

I guess I missed the post that leads you to think someone doesn't think anyone should have them. I just pointed out that for me the Griffin Grip is one of the most useless tools I've ever bought. If it makes someone considering buying a GG think twice about it, then good. I also told that same person: "If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it." I express the same opinion about splash pans. Fortunately, the GG doesn't come with most wheels like the splash pan does (meaning that you have to pay for it, even if you toss it.) Believe it or not here is another tool that in my ever so very humble opinion is even more worthless than splash pans and Griffin Grips, but you might just love it: http://www.sheffield...Tool-p/aqc.htm.

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pres    896

Some people are dead set against them and think no one should have them.

 

 

I guess I missed the post that leads you to think someone doesn't think anyone should have them. I just pointed out that for me the Griffin Grip is one of the most useless tools I've ever bought. If it makes someone considering buying a GG think twice about it, then good. I also told that same person: "If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it." I express the same opinion about splash pans. Fortunately, the GG doesn't come with most wheels like the splash pan does (meaning that you have to pay for it, even if you toss it.) Believe it or not here is another tool that in my ever so very humble opinion is even more worthless than splash pans and Griffin Grips, but you might just love it: http://www.sheffield...Tool-p/aqc.htm.

 

Jim

 

 

That I can agree on! I even believed the same of the levered arms that were out a few years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some people are dead set against them and think no one should have them.

 

 

I guess I missed the post that leads you to think someone doesn't think anyone should have them. I just pointed out that for me the Griffin Grip is one of the most useless tools I've ever bought. If it makes someone considering buying a GG think twice about it, then good. I also told that same person: "If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it." I express the same opinion about splash pans. Fortunately, the GG doesn't come with most wheels like the splash pan does (meaning that you have to pay for it, even if you toss it.) Believe it or not here is another tool that in my ever so very humble opinion is even more worthless than splash pans and Griffin Grips, but you might just love it: http://www.sheffield...Tool-p/aqc.htm.

 

Jim

 

 

I guess you missed the following sentence where she specifically said: "I'm not saying anyone here has said that."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OffCenter    82

Some people are dead set against them and think no one should have them.

 

 

I guess I missed the post that leads you to think someone doesn't think anyone should have them. I just pointed out that for me the Griffin Grip is one of the most useless tools I've ever bought. If it makes someone considering buying a GG think twice about it, then good. I also told that same person: "If you buy one, you will probably be very happy with it." I express the same opinion about splash pans. Fortunately, the GG doesn't come with most wheels like the splash pan does (meaning that you have to pay for it, even if you toss it.) Believe it or not here is another tool that in my ever so very humble opinion is even more worthless than splash pans and Griffin Grips, but you might just love it: http://www.sheffield...Tool-p/aqc.htm.

 

Jim

 

 

I guess you missed the following sentence where she specifically said: "I'm not saying anyone here has said that."

 

 

I guess you missed the following sentence where I specifically said: "I guess I missed the post that leads you to think someone doesn't think anyone should have them."

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×