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Can you talk to me about plates?


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#21 nancylee

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 04:55 AM

Thank you for that explanation. 1973! I am 51, so if I live to 91, maybe I will know half as much! :) I regret so much that it took me so many years to find this.
Nancy
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#22 Pres

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 08:14 AM

I leaned long ago that dinnerware takes some time to process so now I keep a pile og bisque plates handy for orders
I shot them today for you-these are Daves porcelain from Laguna-I always stock a shiny glaze and a simi matt in each at my booth .
I flipped them so you can see my feet and my nubbin in center that I leave to catch the slump if it happens-I also sign the nubbin

Marcia yours look great I love that matt finish

Mark


Great looking plates, I like the nubbin idea. I usually have a double foo ring on mine, but those can get time intensive. I'll have to try the nubbin trick-thanks for posting.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#23 Mark C.

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 07:32 PM

Thank you for that explanation. 1973! I am 51, so if I live to 91, maybe I will know half as much! Posted Image I regret so much that it took me so many years to find this.
Nancy


Have no regrets Nancy you have many years to work with clay ahead. I just found it when I was 18-dumb luck now at 60 I know less every day.
That dinnerware was made when I was in collage-I fired it at home as I had my own kiln while in school. I have been making plates a long time now-I used to make them paper thin but my customers called them potato chips and they broke to easy so since the middle 80s I have made them thicker to stand up to daily use. Supoer thin pots seem to be what you quest toward till you learn they are not very functional-This may take years to get to and some never get it.
Mark
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#24 Benzine

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 08:57 PM

So Mark, the "nubbin" is to prevent against "sagging",due to the large open space, of a plate's foot ring?
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#25 Mark C.

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 09:16 PM

So Mark, the "nubbin" is to prevent against "sagging",due to the large open space, of a plate's foot ring?


Yes -porcelain can move at cone 10/11 a bit and this keeps them from touching down. Just something I have done for 40 years with plates and other forms-its something my work is known for besides super bright/colored glazes ans reasonable prices.
Mark
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#26 OffCenter

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 09:57 PM

Never heard of it before but I think the nubbin is a cool idea. Not bad being known for nubbins, super bright glazes and reasonable prices.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#27 Benzine

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:25 AM


So Mark, the "nubbin" is to prevent against "sagging",due to the large open space, of a plate's foot ring?


Yes -porcelain can move at cone 10/11 a bit and this keeps them from touching down. Just something I have done for 40 years with plates and other forms-its something my work is known for besides super bright/colored glazes ans reasonable prices.
Mark


Interesting. I've never fired that hot, so I guess it's not something I've had to worry about. At what temperature/ cone does this start to become an issue?
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#28 nancylee

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 05:16 AM

Thanks, Mark, for the encouragement, and the information about plate thickness. I know what you mean about wanting to throw thin! But ai tend to like the solid, heavier pieces myself, somehow those pieces feel like handmade to me.
Best,
Nancy
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#29 oldlady

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 09:10 AM

nancylee, don't forget to show us what you finally did.
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#30 annekat

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 04:29 PM

This thread on plates is great. Lots of great suggestions and ideas I don't have time to fully read right now, but certainly will. Plates have always been one of those dreaded things for me, as for probably a number of other potters, too..... Customers seem to have a hard time understanding that there would be anything harder about them compared to other pots, that they take as much clay as they do, why they need to be expensive, etc. I've made sets of thrown plates for people before and it's always been more trouble than it was worth. But I'm undergoing some changes in my approach and the appearance of my work, gravitating toward more simplicity and directness. Slab plates are an option for me now, as well as just simpler thrown forms without as much decoration or fussing around, maybe without feet, even. I worked for a few years for some potters who successfully produced slab built majolica dinnerware and sold it wholesale at the better trade shows. They are no longer producing it, not because it wasn't successful, but because they have moved on to other things. The slab plates had simple and clean lines that didn't interfere with the various patterns painted on, but each had an extruded rim attached, using a self-designed die, which gave the plate substance and stability.
Anne




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