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Chris Campbell

How do you do this?

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Chris Campbell    1,086

Pete Pinnell posted this lovely bowl on his facebook page. All I can say is WOW!

Best guess is that it is a result of controlled clear glaze dripping into holes of pre-made pattern. Let's just say you would have to master both your glaze knowledge and your porcelain work to reach the exact point where it drips into the holes with no visible drip lines beyond the holes and not onto the shelves.

post-1585-136906355381_thumb.jpg

post-1585-136906355381_thumb.jpg

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bigDave    4

 

Best guess is that it is a result of

 

 

Okay Ill play.

 

 

Thinking...

start with a thin transparent type porcelain, green

affix stencil,

with sponge work away some clay to create an even thinner spot

 

bisque, then a thin clear glaze

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OffCenter    82

Pete Pinnell posted this lovely bowl on his facebook page. All I can say is WOW!

Best guess is that it is a result of controlled clear glaze dripping into holes of pre-made pattern. Let's just say you would have to master both your glaze knowledge and your porcelain work to reach the exact point where it drips into the holes with no visible drip lines beyond the holes and not onto the shelves.

 

 

Yeah, there are a couple of other pic of it on his FB page. I've seen this done by simply using a very viscous glaze, but never over holes this big or numerous.

 

Jim

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OffCenter    82

 

Best guess is that it is a result of

 

 

Okay Ill play.

 

 

Thinking...

start with a thin transparent type porcelain, green

affix stencil,

with sponge work away some clay to create an even thinner spot

 

bisque, then a thin clear glaze

 

 

Big Dave, i don't think it is water etching. It would be almost impossible to wash away clay so evenly overall even on something that is the exact same thickness all over, unlike this bowl which is probably at lest a little thick near the bottom.

 

Jim

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bigDave    4

I've seen this done by simply using a very viscous glaze, but never over holes this big or numerous.

 

Jim

 

 

Uh huh, you guys are seeing holes. Viscous glaze eh, interesting ...expound

 

 

 

Another idea,

 

spray or brush resist (wax, maybe shellac) over stencil,

 

clear dip

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JBaymore    1,432

I just saw stuff when I was over in Yixing, China that blew me away as to the technical execution..... amazing. Many of which I pondered, "How is this done"?

 

What if the whole bowl was a very thin bone china, fired to maturity in the ususal slump mold. Then over the translucent body a resist stencil of the pattern was put on and then a opaque white glaze fired to a lower temperature was applied over the resist. So the body only is showing through the area that the stencil protected.

 

Really...... haven't got a clue. Amazing feat no matter HOW it was done.

 

 

best,

 

..................john

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Pres    896

Pete Pinnell posted this lovely bowl on his facebook page. All I can say is WOW!

Best guess is that it is a result of controlled clear glaze dripping into holes of pre-made pattern. Let's just say you would have to master both your glaze knowledge and your porcelain work to reach the exact point where it drips into the holes with no visible drip lines beyond the holes and not onto the shelves.

 

 

I might match it by using a template on the outside, then sandblast the greenware piece with a fine sandblaster like what is used on glass dishes. Then glaze. Either way you look at it, it is aaammmazing!dry.gif Puzzling too!

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Chris Campbell    1,086

Re: Friedl Holzer-Kjellberg's work ... can I just say WOW!!!!!!!!!

I would call that mastery of form and glaze ... incredible learning curve ... not for the feint of heart.

I am totally green with envy and wondering if I should make myself crazy by trying it at least once.

Does anyone have a nice Cone 6 clear recipe?

biggrin.giftongue.gifrolleyes.gif ... just kidding.

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Frederik-W    23

Since this forum is about aesthetics, allow me to comment on the artistic aspect.

In short: I find the bowl crafty but not arty.

 

No doubt it is quite a technical achievement. The comments and interest on that aspect makes that clear.

I like some of his other (more arty) stuff a lot.

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bigDave    4

Since this forum is about aesthetics, allow me to comment on the artistic aspect.

In short: I find the bowl crafty but not arty.

 

No doubt it is quite a technical achievement. The comments and interest on that aspect makes that clear.

I like some of his other (more arty) stuff a lot.

 

 

uh huh....I thought it was about " How do you do this"

 

That case I find it Crafarty

 

ph34r.gif

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jrgpots    231

I just saw stuff when I was over in Yixing, China that blew me away as to the technical execution..... amazing. Many of which I pondered, "How is this done"?

 

What if the whole bowl was a very thin bone china, fired to maturity in the ususal slump mold. Then over the translucent body a resist stencil of the pattern was put on and then a opaque white glaze fired to a lower temperature was applied over the resist. So the body only is showing through the area that the stencil protected.

 

Really...... haven't got a clue. Amazing feat no matter HOW it was done.

 

 

best,

 

..................john

 

 

My vote is with Joh here. Fire thin bone china to maturity, then use a resist for the floral pattern, followed by glazing with opaque glaze at lower temp? It would look even better if the opaque glaze were egg shell, not fully white, giving more accent to the transucent pattern.

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Jroe    0

Re: Friedl Holzer-Kjellberg's work ... can I just say WOW!!!!!!!!!

I would call that mastery of form and glaze ... incredible learning curve ... not for the feint of heart.

I am totally green with envy and wondering if I should make myself crazy by trying it at least once.

Does anyone have a nice Cone 6 clear recipe?

biggrin.giftongue.gifrolleyes.gif ... just kidding.

This is a Harry Memmott cone 6 clear glaze..good with underglazes and lustres and best of all...three ingredients!

Kaolin 15

Silica 35

Gerstley Borate 50

Let me know if you like it.

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Gotta be just a resist decoration.

 

How would you get a glaze to drip across hols and fill them perfectly smooth?

 

It's just a well done resist on very thin porcelin. Only the flower designs were rubbed away, and as small as they are you can't tell if they have an 'even surface'.

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Mart    23

1) make a thin bowl (poured)

2) let it dry a bit, then draw and and cut the pattern

3) bisque fire

4) cover with your "secret" clear porcelain glaze (high viscosity at firing temp)

5) glazefire

6) make everyone explode in envy or go green and then explode ;)

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TwinRocks    17

I have a vintage Chinese tea set with an extremely simplified variation on this idea. The cut outs are small pointed ovals, and the width of these piercings is just a tad thicker than the wall of the cup. To me, it looks like the glaze used in the openings is different than the clear glaze used over the rest of the piece, I would assume some where you could find a glaze recipe tailored to this purpose? It has been more than a decade since I took a clay and glaze formulation course, so I am useless in the guessing what the difference may be. On the piece I have in hand, the windows are opaque unless you hold it up to a light, the bowl in your photo appears to be much finer.

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drmyrtle    51

IMHO, this is not an example of piercing. If you look carefully at the two examples, the Chinese pierced bowls have slight variation in the placement of the holes, while the Pinnell piece is completely symmetrical in the pattern, which replicates to other patterns. Piercing would distort the clay too much, too, at least by my hand with work this thin.

 

I also don't think this is wash away either. When I do that the resisted portion is elevated and gives a depth to the water-carved surface.

 

I'm of the mind that this is a thin bowl, sprayed once in clear, non crazing glaze. (That's the recipe I want.) then, a resist stencil, and probably latex to get those fine perfect edges, is applied. The whole thing is again sprayed with a slightly opaque glaze. Perhaps a fine wet brush dabs off blobs over the resist. Fire. Dazzle. Repeat.

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I also don't think this is wash away either. When I do that the resisted portion is elevated and gives a depth to the water-carved surface.

 

I'm of the mind that this is a thin bowl, sprayed once in clear, non crazing glaze. (That's the recipe I want.) then, a resist stencil, and probably latex to get those fine perfect edges, is applied. The whole thing is again sprayed with a slightly opaque glaze. Perhaps a fine wet brush dabs off blobs over the resist. Fire. Dazzle. Repeat.

 

If the figure-ground is flipped, this argument makes no sense. To replicate this, I would paper resist the lacquer resist, and then "water carve."

 

I also see no need for multiple glazes, not sure where this idea comes from, but replicating with a single glaze would be fine.

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alabama    144

How I would attempt to do this.

This is just a hunch.  But I would use my favorite cone 10 porcellin clay - Highwater's Helios

and make a vessel.  Trim until translusent.  Get a dremel tool with a round diamond tip and make

a design on inside.  Borrow the light box from the art dept and flip the bowl upside down on

light box.  Then lightly match the inside etching with an exterior etching, being careful

NOT to make it pierce work.  Then glaze the bisqued piece with clear glaze.

I'd fire this cone 10 reduction, since clear fired in reduction becomes grey, which would

make it appear clear on the translucent white clay body.

If it matched Pinnell's example, great!  If not, re-group and try something else.

But this would be my starting point if I were to try figuring out this technique.

 

PS - Pete is a really neat potter to sit down and talk with if you ever get a chance.

 

In my most humble opinion,

Alabama :)

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Rae Reich    67

The reason it's called rice grain is this: grains of uncooked rice are pressed into the surface of porcelain when it's almost leather hard. The dry rice and the damp clay equalize when the timing is right. They are not pressed all the way through. They burn out in bisque firing, leaving pockets that fill with the transparent glaze.

The contemporary piece seems to use the same technique, but with shapes other than rice. My guess is thick watercolor paper cut into various shapes with those cool cutters that scrapbookers use.

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phill    17

I worked with an artist at Harvard named Akio Niisato. His work is similar, and he just drills holes in his pieces, bisques them, glazes and fires them. His glaze is specific I'm sure, and sometimes he has to refire them to fill all the holes, but that's how he works. Search for him on google.

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Joseph F    865

I worked with an artist at Harvard named Akio Niisato. His work is similar, and he just drills holes in his pieces, bisques them, glazes and fires them. His glaze is specific I'm sure, and sometimes he has to refire them to fill all the holes, but that's how he works. Search for him on google.

 

His work is awesome.

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