Jump to content


Photo

How do you do this?


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,103 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 20 May 2013 - 10:25 AM

Pete Pinnell posted this lovely bowl on his facebook page. All I can say is WOW!
Best guess is that it is a result of controlled clear glaze dripping into holes of pre-made pattern. Let's just say you would have to master both your glaze knowledge and your porcelain work to reach the exact point where it drips into the holes with no visible drip lines beyond the holes and not onto the shelves.

Attached Files


Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
www.ccpottery.com

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#2 bigDave

bigDave

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 89 posts
  • LocationSo-Cal

Posted 20 May 2013 - 11:10 AM


Best guess is that it is a result of


Okay Ill play.


Thinking...
start with a thin transparent type porcelain, green
affix stencil,
with sponge work away some clay to create an even thinner spot

bisque, then a thin clear glaze

#3 OffCenter

OffCenter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts

Posted 20 May 2013 - 11:28 AM

Pete Pinnell posted this lovely bowl on his facebook page. All I can say is WOW!
Best guess is that it is a result of controlled clear glaze dripping into holes of pre-made pattern. Let's just say you would have to master both your glaze knowledge and your porcelain work to reach the exact point where it drips into the holes with no visible drip lines beyond the holes and not onto the shelves.


Yeah, there are a couple of other pic of it on his FB page. I've seen this done by simply using a very viscous glaze, but never over holes this big or numerous.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#4 OffCenter

OffCenter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts

Posted 20 May 2013 - 11:33 AM



Best guess is that it is a result of


Okay Ill play.


Thinking...
start with a thin transparent type porcelain, green
affix stencil,
with sponge work away some clay to create an even thinner spot

bisque, then a thin clear glaze


Big Dave, i don't think it is water etching. It would be almost impossible to wash away clay so evenly overall even on something that is the exact same thickness all over, unlike this bowl which is probably at lest a little thick near the bottom.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#5 bigDave

bigDave

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 89 posts
  • LocationSo-Cal

Posted 20 May 2013 - 02:54 PM

I've seen this done by simply using a very viscous glaze, but never over holes this big or numerous.

Jim


Uh huh, you guys are seeing holes. Viscous glaze eh, interesting ...expound



Another idea,

spray or brush resist (wax, maybe shellac) over stencil,

clear dip

#6 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,796 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 20 May 2013 - 03:07 PM

I just saw stuff when I was over in Yixing, China that blew me away as to the technical execution..... amazing. Many of which I pondered, "How is this done"?

What if the whole bowl was a very thin bone china, fired to maturity in the ususal slump mold. Then over the translucent body a resist stencil of the pattern was put on and then a opaque white glaze fired to a lower temperature was applied over the resist. So the body only is showing through the area that the stencil protected.

Really...... haven't got a clue. Amazing feat no matter HOW it was done.


best,

..................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#7 Chantay

Chantay

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 197 posts
  • LocationVirginia, USA

Posted 21 May 2013 - 12:15 AM

John, wow us with pics!!! You did have a camera, right?
- chantay

#8 Matt Oz

Matt Oz

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 265 posts
  • LocationMichigan

Posted 21 May 2013 - 01:20 PM

Looks similar to the the Chinese rice grain porcelain technique, where holes are cut out or pierced, then filled with glaze.

ricegrain.jpg

http://gotheborg.com...ricegrain.shtml


Also famously done by Friedl Holzer-Kjellberg

 



#9 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 1,894 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 21 May 2013 - 03:23 PM

Pete Pinnell posted this lovely bowl on his facebook page. All I can say is WOW!
Best guess is that it is a result of controlled clear glaze dripping into holes of pre-made pattern. Let's just say you would have to master both your glaze knowledge and your porcelain work to reach the exact point where it drips into the holes with no visible drip lines beyond the holes and not onto the shelves.


I might match it by using a template on the outside, then sandblast the greenware piece with a fine sandblaster like what is used on glass dishes. Then glaze. Either way you look at it, it is aaammmazing!Posted Image Puzzling too!

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#10 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,103 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 23 May 2013 - 03:26 PM

Re: Friedl Holzer-Kjellberg's work ... can I just say WOW!!!!!!!!!
I would call that mastery of form and glaze ... incredible learning curve ... not for the feint of heart.
I am totally green with envy and wondering if I should make myself crazy by trying it at least once.
Does anyone have a nice Cone 6 clear recipe?
Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image ... just kidding.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
www.ccpottery.com

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#11 Matt Oz

Matt Oz

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 265 posts
  • LocationMichigan

Posted 23 May 2013 - 06:26 PM

I don’t know, I think you just might be crazy enough to try it. :rolleyes:



#12 Frederik-W

Frederik-W

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 292 posts
  • Locationa distant moon of Uranus

Posted 24 May 2013 - 10:34 PM

Since this forum is about aesthetics, allow me to comment on the artistic aspect.
In short: I find the bowl crafty but not arty.

No doubt it is quite a technical achievement. The comments and interest on that aspect makes that clear.
I like some of his other
(more arty) stuff a lot.


#13 bigDave

bigDave

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 89 posts
  • LocationSo-Cal

Posted 25 May 2013 - 05:01 PM

Since this forum is about aesthetics, allow me to comment on the artistic aspect.
In short: I find the bowl crafty but not arty.

No doubt it is quite a technical achievement. The comments and interest on that aspect makes that clear.
I like some of his other
(more arty) stuff a lot.


uh huh....I thought it was about " How do you do this"

That case I find it Crafarty

Posted Image

#14 jrgpots

jrgpots

    The hands can express the soul

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 450 posts
  • LocationHurricane, Utah

Posted 25 May 2013 - 09:01 PM

I just saw stuff when I was over in Yixing, China that blew me away as to the technical execution..... amazing. Many of which I pondered, "How is this done"?

What if the whole bowl was a very thin bone china, fired to maturity in the ususal slump mold. Then over the translucent body a resist stencil of the pattern was put on and then a opaque white glaze fired to a lower temperature was applied over the resist. So the body only is showing through the area that the stencil protected.

Really...... haven't got a clue. Amazing feat no matter HOW it was done.


best,

..................john


My vote is with Joh here. Fire thin bone china to maturity, then use a resist for the floral pattern, followed by glazing with opaque glaze at lower temp? It would look even better if the opaque glaze were egg shell, not fully white, giving more accent to the transucent pattern.

#15 Jroe

Jroe

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • LocationAustralia

Posted 12 June 2013 - 06:21 PM

Re: Friedl Holzer-Kjellberg's work ... can I just say WOW!!!!!!!!!
I would call that mastery of form and glaze ... incredible learning curve ... not for the feint of heart.
I am totally green with envy and wondering if I should make myself crazy by trying it at least once.
Does anyone have a nice Cone 6 clear recipe?
Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image ... just kidding.

This is a Harry Memmott cone 6 clear glaze..good with underglazes and lustres and best of all...three ingredients!
Kaolin 15
Silica 35
Gerstley Borate 50
Let me know if you like it.

#16 Rebel_Rocker

Rebel_Rocker

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 46 posts

Posted 24 June 2013 - 06:25 PM

Gotta be just a resist decoration.

How would you get a glaze to drip across hols and fill them perfectly smooth?

It's just a well done resist on very thin porcelin. Only the flower designs were rubbed away, and as small as they are you can't tell if they have an 'even surface'.

#17 Mart

Mart

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 282 posts

Posted 12 August 2013 - 02:33 AM

1) make a thin bowl (poured)

2) let it dry a bit, then draw and and cut the pattern

3) bisque fire

4) cover with your "secret" clear porcelain glaze (high viscosity at firing temp)

5) glazefire

6) make everyone explode in envy or go green and then explode ;)



#18 TwinRocks

TwinRocks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts

Posted 21 July 2014 - 10:13 AM

I have a vintage Chinese tea set with an extremely simplified variation on this idea. The cut outs are small pointed ovals, and the width of these piercings is just a tad thicker than the wall of the cup. To me, it looks like the glaze used in the openings is different than the clear glaze used over the rest of the piece, I would assume some where you could find a glaze recipe tailored to this purpose? It has been more than a decade since I took a clay and glaze formulation course, so I am useless in the guessing what the difference may be. On the piece I have in hand, the windows are opaque unless you hold it up to a light, the bowl in your photo appears to be much finer.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users