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#1 Brittany

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 05:02 PM

Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany



#2 neilestrick

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 05:08 PM

Any dark clay will darken the glazes. You'll have to either find glazes that work well with dark clay or switch to a white body. As for application, brush on 3 coats in alternating directions.
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#3 OffCenter

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 06:13 PM

Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#4 Brittany

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:49 PM


Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?



#5 OffCenter

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 09:49 PM



Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#6 Benzine

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 10:10 PM




Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#7 Iforgot

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 11:00 PM

I would recommend Snowy Plum by Coyote.
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#8 Mark C.

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 12:18 AM





Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*


I think its a baby Grand with the bench made from splash pans.
Mark
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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#9 OffCenter

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 08:43 AM





Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*


Sorry to disappoint but there is no back story except that I am shocked by how many potters (not just beginners) make leaking pots. Sure they leak very slowly because the liquid has to seep through microscopic crackle in the glaze and then through a clay body that is almost mature, but such a vase left long enough on a grand pi.... Louis XIV commode will leak. The first thing any potter should do when they start working with a new clay is do a leak test.

Now, since I don't know what you look like, I keep seeing that pupil-less avatar or yours polishing a monocle.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#10 OffCenter

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 08:45 AM






Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*


I think its a baby Grand with the bench made from splash pans.
Mark


Oh god, now Mark is a comedian!

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#11 TJR

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 11:09 AM







Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*


I think its a baby Grand with the bench made from splash pans.
Mark


Oh god, now Mark is a comedian!

Jim

Jim;
That's how I ruined my grand piano. Had to buy another one. What does one do with two grand pianos. One has a horrible white spot on the varnish.
TJR.Posted Image

#12 OffCenter

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 11:36 AM








Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*


I think its a baby Grand with the bench made from splash pans.
Mark


Oh god, now Mark is a comedian!

Jim

Jim;
That's how I ruined my grand piano. Had to buy another one. What does one do with two grand pianos. One has a horrible white spot on the varnish.
TJR.Posted Image


I figured you'd chime in on this! BTW, I don't know if you saw it in another thread but I apologized for being a bit curt with you over something you asked but I forget what it was now.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#13 Benzine

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:48 PM






Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*


Sorry to disappoint but there is no back story except that I am shocked by how many potters (not just beginners) make leaking pots. Sure they leak very slowly because the liquid has to seep through microscopic crackle in the glaze and then through a clay body that is almost mature, but such a vase left long enough on a grand pi.... Louis XIV commode will leak. The first thing any potter should do when they start working with a new clay is do a leak test.

Now, since I don't know what you look like, I keep seeing that pupil-less avatar or yours polishing a monocle.

Jim


Dang, I was hoping there was some, in depth story. Like how, you mistakenly sold someone, a leaky ware, and they ended up being some shady, ruthless figure, who has since hunted you across the ends of the Earth. And this would also explain, why you keep changing your avatar, as an attempt to stay incognito.....and also, why you'd choose to live in Georgia.......
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#14 OffCenter

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 07:57 AM







Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*


Sorry to disappoint but there is no back story except that I am shocked by how many potters (not just beginners) make leaking pots. Sure they leak very slowly because the liquid has to seep through microscopic crackle in the glaze and then through a clay body that is almost mature, but such a vase left long enough on a grand pi.... Louis XIV commode will leak. The first thing any potter should do when they start working with a new clay is do a leak test.

Now, since I don't know what you look like, I keep seeing that pupil-less avatar or yours polishing a monocle.

Jim


Dang, I was hoping there was some, in depth story. Like how, you mistakenly sold someone, a leaky ware, and they ended up being some shady, ruthless figure, who has since hunted you across the ends of the Earth. And this would also explain, why you keep changing your avatar, as an attempt to stay incognito.....and also, why you'd choose to live in Georgia.......


I live in Middle Georgia (aka The Heart of Darkness) for the flora not the fauna.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#15 Benzine

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 10:15 PM








Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*


Sorry to disappoint but there is no back story except that I am shocked by how many potters (not just beginners) make leaking pots. Sure they leak very slowly because the liquid has to seep through microscopic crackle in the glaze and then through a clay body that is almost mature, but such a vase left long enough on a grand pi.... Louis XIV commode will leak. The first thing any potter should do when they start working with a new clay is do a leak test.

Now, since I don't know what you look like, I keep seeing that pupil-less avatar or yours polishing a monocle.

Jim


Dang, I was hoping there was some, in depth story. Like how, you mistakenly sold someone, a leaky ware, and they ended up being some shady, ruthless figure, who has since hunted you across the ends of the Earth. And this would also explain, why you keep changing your avatar, as an attempt to stay incognito.....and also, why you'd choose to live in Georgia.......


I live in Middle Georgia (aka The Heart of Darkness) for the flora not the fauna.

Jim



Haha, just giving you a hard time. I'm sure Georgia and the people there are lovely.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#16 OffCenter

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 10:45 AM









Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*


Sorry to disappoint but there is no back story except that I am shocked by how many potters (not just beginners) make leaking pots. Sure they leak very slowly because the liquid has to seep through microscopic crackle in the glaze and then through a clay body that is almost mature, but such a vase left long enough on a grand pi.... Louis XIV commode will leak. The first thing any potter should do when they start working with a new clay is do a leak test.

Now, since I don't know what you look like, I keep seeing that pupil-less avatar or yours polishing a monocle.

Jim


Dang, I was hoping there was some, in depth story. Like how, you mistakenly sold someone, a leaky ware, and they ended up being some shady, ruthless figure, who has since hunted you across the ends of the Earth. And this would also explain, why you keep changing your avatar, as an attempt to stay incognito.....and also, why you'd choose to live in Georgia.......


I live in Middle Georgia (aka The Heart of Darkness) for the flora not the fauna.

Jim



Haha, just giving you a hard time. I'm sure Georgia and the people there are lovely.


I wish I could introduce you to my neighbors. I actually had a Mexican standoff with one of them.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#17 Benzine

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 06:11 PM










Today I finished my first batch of pots for this month, but realized that the glazes are not a good match for the type of clay I am using. I use the red clay from Georgia, which just happens to be a bit coarse. It also just happens to be darkening the glazes and changing th outcomes of the pieces. Any suggestions on good types of glazes(store bought) for Georgian clay and good methods of applying the glazes evenly?

Thanks-
Brittany


What you call "Georgian clay" is most likely Lizella Clay (aka Lizella Red). It's a beautiful clay but it will leak no matter how high you fire it or how many glazes you put on it. It should never be used for anything expected to hold liquids. It looks good fired to earthenware temps and takes low fire glazes well but is weak and really leaks badly at low temps. It should be fired to cone 6 but will still leak (but slowly) unless you add lots of Neph Sy to it. It should be bisqued high (~04+) because it has lots of impurities in it (dug from a swamp a few miles from my house) that will gas off during the glaze firing and ruin the glaze if the organics have not been burned off completely during the bisque. It's hard to find a glaze that works well on it because of the high iron content. Use an opaque glaze that can be applied thick without running. The holder in the cup & holder in this picture is Lizella Red. http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2584

Jim


What clay would you recommend for a beginner interested in making pieces that may hold water, but is low-fire ( cone 05-06)?


I'd recommend that if you intend to make pots that hold liquids that you fire higher. Any clay properly formulated for cone 6 should not leak at all even with no glaze on it. There are lots of good cone 6 clays from translucent porcelain to rich red-browns to black. And you will find plenty of beautiful glazes in that range. If you decide to to do low-fire, then I think you have to depend on glazes that fit the clay body so well that the leaking is almost eliminated so that a mug works as long as it is not left on a grand piano overnight. But, somebody else can probably address that better than me because, even though I love the majolica work of low-fire potters like Linda Arbuckle and Jill Manos, I've never done it and don't know how they seal majolica that holds liquids.

Jim


Jim, whenever the discussion revolves around making usable wares, that hold water, you always mention the grand piano thing. Is there a back story, or are you just going on the assumption, that everyone owns a grand piano.....I mean I do, but that's just because I'm well to do.....*Polishes monocle*


Sorry to disappoint but there is no back story except that I am shocked by how many potters (not just beginners) make leaking pots. Sure they leak very slowly because the liquid has to seep through microscopic crackle in the glaze and then through a clay body that is almost mature, but such a vase left long enough on a grand pi.... Louis XIV commode will leak. The first thing any potter should do when they start working with a new clay is do a leak test.

Now, since I don't know what you look like, I keep seeing that pupil-less avatar or yours polishing a monocle.

Jim


Dang, I was hoping there was some, in depth story. Like how, you mistakenly sold someone, a leaky ware, and they ended up being some shady, ruthless figure, who has since hunted you across the ends of the Earth. And this would also explain, why you keep changing your avatar, as an attempt to stay incognito.....and also, why you'd choose to live in Georgia.......


I live in Middle Georgia (aka The Heart of Darkness) for the flora not the fauna.

Jim



Haha, just giving you a hard time. I'm sure Georgia and the people there are lovely.


I wish I could introduce you to my neighbors. I actually had a Mexican standoff with one of them.

Jim


Like Reservoir Dogs? That's just madness! What was the dispute over?
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#18 clay lover

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 06:58 PM

Hi, Brittany, glad you posted.

One question, is there a reason you are choosing low fire? Will the kiln you are using go to ^6?

I do ^6 and find good working dark clays at Highwater. The color of your clay will change the look of most glazes. Sometimes so dramatically that you would not think it is the same glaze applied on white and compared to what that glaze looks like on dark clay. I use several different clays from white to deep red and some of my glazes I love on one clay and will never use on a dark clay.

You could get 1 box of white and one of dark and do some test tiles from each, then test glazes on each color to help you figure out what you like and want to use.
Good luck and keep posting.

#19 OffCenter

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 07:05 PM

Like Reservoir Dogs? That's just madness! What was the dispute over?


Not that dramatic. A neighbor hunting in my woods. I tell him to leave and he points a shotgun at me and I jump behind a tree and point my rifle at him. We were so far apart that his shotgun wouldn't have done much damage to me so I had all the advantage. It ended with him inviting me to swim in his new pool.... Gotta tell you this one, though, even though somebody's gonna say, "What the hell does this have to do with "Recommended Glazes?".... On the other side of our woods lived a big family (two double-wides full) of repo-people. For fun they shot beer cans off posts while riding their Harleys. They got all POed over me shooting one of their dogs gutting one of my goats and after a lot of arguing and threats we end up in court. I whisper to the judge that I don't want to take an oath that has anything to do with a Bible or some fantasy guy in the sky. The judge laughed and my neighbor and his wife went crazy thinking the judge and I were friends. I think he almost died right there, he turned so red and started sweating. I won and my neighbor was fined a couple of hundred dollars. I gave him the finger and walked out. A few days later my neighbor had a heart attack and died. He had 4 hardcore redneck, Harley-riding, repo-men sons and a wife who was meaner than any of them. I knew they'd say I killed their dad. So I had to carry a gun to my studio and couldn't leave my wife alone for a month or two until one of my llamas died near their house and I went down there and they came out and said, "We ain't mad at you no more. The meth's what really did him in, not you." One of them helped me drag the llama into the woods for the buzzards.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#20 Benzine

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 09:06 PM



Like Reservoir Dogs? That's just madness! What was the dispute over?


Not that dramatic. A neighbor hunting in my woods. I tell him to leave and he points a shotgun at me and I jump behind a tree and point my rifle at him. We were so far apart that his shotgun wouldn't have done much damage to me so I had all the advantage. It ended with him inviting me to swim in his new pool.... Gotta tell you this one, though, even though somebody's gonna say, "What the hell does this have to do with "Recommended Glazes?".... On the other side of our woods lived a big family (two double-wides full) of repo-people. For fun they shot beer cans off posts while riding their Harleys. They got all POed over me shooting one of their dogs gutting one of my goats and after a lot of arguing and threats we end up in court. I whisper to the judge that I don't want to take an oath that has anything to do with a Bible or some fantasy guy in the sky. The judge laughed and my neighbor and his wife went crazy thinking the judge and I were friends. I think he almost died right there, he turned so red and started sweating. I won and my neighbor was fined a couple of hundred dollars. I gave him the finger and walked out. A few days later my neighbor had a heart attack and died. He had 4 hardcore redneck, Harley-riding, repo-men sons and a wife who was meaner than any of them. I knew they'd say I killed their dad. So I had to carry a gun to my studio and couldn't leave my wife alone for a month or two until one of my llamas died near their house and I went down there and they came out and said, "We ain't mad at you no more. The meth's what really did him in, not you." One of them helped me drag the llama into the woods for the buzzards.

Jim


Jim, if you wrote a book of life experiences/ stories, I'd pick it up in a heart beat.

The story may not have to do with glazes, but it does explain, why in another topic, you were so adamant about not putting your wheel, so your back was to the door.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"




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